Go to the Egyptian Dreams shop
Egyptian Dreams
Ancient Egypt Discussion Board
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Heka, concept or God

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Egyptian Dreams Forum Index -> Mythology and Religion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Nefer-ka-Anpu
Citizen
Citizen


Joined: 08 Dec 2004
Posts: 28
Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2004 11:15 am    Post subject: Heka, concept or God Reply with quote

I have encountered the word "Heka" (or heqa or hekau) both as a concept meaning the creative force of life or magic as well as the name of a God. Can anyone perhaps shed some light on this by sharing what they know or think?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
anneke
Queen of Egypt
Queen of Egypt


Joined: 23 Jan 2004
Posts: 9305

PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2004 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heka was the egyptian god of magic. He was depicted jolding two snakes crossed in front of him.
There's a discussion of it here

"heka" or "heqa" was also part of names.
Hekanakht was a Viceroy (of Nubia I think) during the time of Ramses II

I think there's also a Nubian prince in the tomb of the Viceroy Huy (time of Tutankhamen) with a Heka based name.
_________________
Math and Art: http://mathematicsaroundus.blogspot.com/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kmt_sesh
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 7099
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2004 2:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anneke's right. The word "heka" has numerous meanings, and besides the ones she mentioned, "heka" was also a term for "ruler" and for words denoting or involved with leadership (e.g., "hekat" can mean "sceptor" or "rulership," depending on the determinative used in the writing of the word). "Heka" can simply mean "rule" or "ruler."

This word was also often used to refer specifically to rulers from foreign lands. Hence we have the word "heka khaswt," which came down to us in corrupted form as "Hyksos," the ancient Canaanites who controlled part of Egypt in the Second Intermediate Period (and quite possibly the expulsion of whom resulted much later in the story of the Biblical Exodus, though with the victor/vanquished reversed, of course!).

As anneke alluded to, "heka" also has connotations of magical power. The ancients believed that this magical power existed from the time of creation and helped to cause the creation event, and so the god Heka can also be looked at as a creator god. So when you hear words like "strenght" and "power" attributed to the Egyptian word "heka," these denote aspects of the magical more so than the physical (whereas a term like "djed" is more related to physical strength).

As to the spelling, you'll often see it as "heka" or "heqa." In transliteration the "k" would have a dot under it; in either case, this "k" or "q" is meant to approximate a sound that doesn't exist in most Western languages--a hard "k" pronounced at the back of the throat. You also mentioned the spelling "hekau"; in the proper sense this would refer to the plural of "leader" or "foreign leader." For instance, in our museum's collection we have a jade and gold ring that belonged to Thutmosis III, and on it are inscribed the hieroglyhpic words "Mai hekau," which means "Ruler of [foreign] rulers." "Mai" actually means "lion," but in this sense it has the common analogy of royalty and kingship in ancient Egypt.

Sorry this got so long-winded. When it comes to the language of the ancients, I can't help myself!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
isisinacrisis
Pharaoh
Pharaoh


Joined: 17 Jan 2004
Posts: 2228
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2004 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've never heard of the theory that the Hebrew exodus could have actually been a Hyskos exodus. That's very new to me.

Sorry to go at a Do you really think the Egyptians would have enslaved the entire Hebrew population? I really don't like that idea. I don't think the Egyptians were very slave obsessed and that they treated their slaves well and gave them certain rights...but I'm not sure.
_________________
High-Priestess of Isis, Hereditary Princess, Lady of Philae, Favourite of Osiris, the Lord of Abydos, Daughter of Horus, Chantress of Bastet, Superior of the Kitty Litter Wink
<---Check out my av-I made it myself Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kmt_sesh
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 7099
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Sat Dec 11, 2004 1:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm no athiest, but through my studies I've come to regard much of the Bible as suspect as far as history goes. It is not a history book but more of a collection of ancient Judaic myths, fables, and laws. We know the Hebrews didn't even begin to write all of the original Books of the Bible until around the 6th Century BCE. That being said, I myself rather doubt the Biblical Exodus ever occurred--at least nothing like in the way it is told in the Bible.

The theory about the Hyksos is not uncommon. They were ancient Canaanites, precursors (to a degree) of the Jews, and to me their expulsion at the end of the Second Intermediate Period makes for a very believable origin of the Exodus of Biblical fame. I should note that it is not a theory on which all historians and Egyptologists agree, of course. In fact, many discount it, but I for one see logic and foundation behind the theory.

You're right about the state of slaves in ancient Egypt. Most slaves were prisoners of war or the families of foreign soldiers taken after victorious conquest. And many were very well treated. In the Egyptian system of law slaves could be freed or provided for in the master's will (leaving your possessions to a slave was one way to keep the government from taking them when you died, should you have no heirs). Slaves could even marry native Egyptian citizens. The slave who was the worst off was the convicted criminal, who was often sent to work in brutal places like the mines of Nubia.

I'm sure there were Jewish slaves in ancient Egypt, but there were many more Jews who lived side by side with the Egyptians as merchants, businessmen, and fellow community members. The Jews built their own temples in Egypt--not to Egyptian gods but to their god Yahu (Yahweh). There are many, many problems with the story of the Exodus, and like I said, I for one don't think it ever happened. There simply is no legitimate evidence whatsoever--anywhere at all outside the Bible itself--that it actually happened.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Egyptian Dreams Forum Index -> Mythology and Religion All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group