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Children's Programming & Egyptian Imagrey

 
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2005 3:31 am    Post subject: Children's Programming & Egyptian Imagrey Reply with quote

I was home sick today and had the television on. Half-asleep, I was absently heading toward the SciFi Channel to see what was on there, but fell asleep along the way, in mid-click. I guess I landed no the Cartoon Network, which is only a couple of channels away.

I awoke sometime later to see a group of colorfully clothed hippopotami dancing in a marsh setting, surrounded by Egyptian-style columns. They were singing "'Please' and 'thank you' are the secrets of the Nile." I thought I was perhaps hallucinating, given my half-lucid and somewhat feverish state, or maybe just dreaming. But when I was fully awake, there they were: a bunch of cartoon hippopotami dancing and singing about Egypt.

It's amazing how much Egypt-style imagery bombard us every day. It's even on little kids' cartoons. Because little kids talk about Tutenstein at our museum (mostly little boys), I have watched a few episodes and have found that this cartoon does indeed teach a few useful things about ancient Egypt. For instance, last weekend I met a young boy who knew about the wsr staff because he had seen it on Tutenstein. Granted, on the cartoon it shot lightening bolts and other such nonsense, but otherwise how many seven year olds are going to know about the wsr staff?

Now, if only Scooby Doo would get off its ghoul-fest and stop scaring the crap out of little kids before they go to museums to see the real thing, we'll have made some true progress.

No questions posed here. I just wanted to share my hippopotami visions from earlier today. Personally I'm glad that Egypt is so much a part of popular culture.

To anneke: Dancing hippopotami? Remind you of our dancing elephants on Elephantine?
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anneke
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2005 4:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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To anneke: Dancing hippopotami? Remind you of our dancing elephants on Elephantine?

Very Happy That did flash through my mind when I read your post.

I wondered why you were posting during the day. Hope you feel better soon.

Tutenstein seems to be going strong. I think it's a fun show.

I'm not sure when children really learn about egypt. My friends 5 year old daughter asked me who that was in a wall hanging (a cross stitched Tutankhamen). I didn't have time to tell her much, but it's something that clearly caught her eye. I figure that at some point they will discover my egyptian book collection and start asking questions. Smile
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2005 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love Tutenstien! I like the way that although the stories are pure fantasy, they are quite mythologically and Egyptologically accurate, which is rarely found in most movies about Egypt.

I thought it was called the 'was' scepter though? They say that in my Egypt books as well.

I don't know what you mean about dancing elephants, but there were dancing hippos in a Disney cartoon, dressed as ballerinas! I wish i could have seen the Egypt one though.

Egypt has a very special 'je-ne-sais-quoi' (as the French would say) about it, and it seems to entice and attract people, maybe it's it's mystery, or the unique elegance of it's art. As soon as you see a piece of Egyptian art/architecture, you KNOW it's Egyptian straight away/
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 12:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the concern, anneke. I'm feeling somewhat better and made it into work today, though I left a touch early. At least I wasn't seeing dancing hippopotami!

Quote:
I'm not sure when children really learn about egypt.


At the museum I regularly help school kids with their assignments. I think the youngest I assisted in our exhibit was a 12-year-old boy, a sixth grader. Most are younger teens. I'm not sure if that's the norm for schools all over the country, or more particular to large cities like Chicago with museums that have decent Egyptian exhibits that can be useful to a teacher's curriculum. Many of the teachers in Chicago use the Field Museum's exhibits for class projects. One thing I do know is that when I was that age, Egypt was little more than a page or two in a dusty history book. I envy these kids today! For some reason they don't quite understand it when I tell them that. Could it possibly be that they're not as enthusiastic as I? Heavens no! Surprised

From isisinacrisis:

Quote:
I thought it was called the 'was' scepter though?


SLAM! Ouch, you got me. This is one thing I often get confused. In Egyptian w3s is the general word for "scepter", and can also mean "dominion." It's also an important component in the word W3st, which is what the Egyptians called the Theban region. And this is generally the scepter you see gods holding, including the modified one which Ptah is usually shown clutching. It is the scepter with the jackal-like head and, frequently, a forked base.

The word I used, wsr, is also a scepter glyph and means "strong" or "powerful." It is also used at times to mean "wealthy" and "influential." About the only difference in appearance between the two is that the wsr scepter doesn't have a forked base (it does have the jackal-like head, though). I get the iconography confused sometimes. Thanks for pointing that out to me, isisinacrisis. I shall remember it.

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I don't know what you mean about dancing elephants


You don't want to know. It involves more of my overly active imagination.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 1:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
At least I wasn't seeing dancing hippopotami!

*Phew* Laughing Your co-workers would have been rather startled at the "Watch out! Behind You! Elephants and Hippopotami!"

Or are they used to that by now ? Twisted Evil

kmt_sesh wrote:
At the museum I regularly help school kids with their assignments. I think the youngest I assisted in our exhibit was a 12-year-old boy, a sixth grader. Most are younger teens. I'm not sure if that's the norm for schools all over the country, or more particular to large cities like Chicago with museums that have decent Egyptian exhibits that can be useful to a teacher's curriculum. Many of the teachers in Chicago use the Field Museum's exhibits for class projects. One thing I do know is that when I was that age, Egypt was little more than a page or two in a dusty history book. I envy these kids today! For some reason they don't quite understand it when I tell them that. Could it possibly be that they're not as enthusiastic as I? Heavens no! Surprised

I remember learning about egypt from a book in the library (at ca 14). After that I did go to the Alard Pierson Museum in Amsterdam and the museum in Leiden.

It is nice when you can use great resources like the Field Museum to support what you do in the classroom.

I know how you feel though. I'm always slightly more enthusiastic about egypt than others around me.....
I know, shocking. Bet you didn't expect that... Laughing

Somehow your comment about kid's reactions reminds me of how two 5 year olds I know do dead on impression of their teachers. Pretty funny to see them mimic the intonation and the mannerisms.
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 1:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Your co-workers would have been rather startled at the "Watch out! Behind You! Elephants and Hippopotami!" Or are they used to that by now?


Really, I don't think they know what to expect of me. I like to keep 'em guessing. Twisted Evil

Quote:
I know how you feel though. I'm always slightly more enthusiastic about egypt than others around me.....I know, shocking. Bet you didn't expect that...


I know exactly what you mean. Only a couple of friends outside the museum share anything close to the obsession I have with Egypt, and they live far away. I feel like I have to keep it bottled up when I'm not at the museum. I think some time ago we were joking on another thread about support groups for people like us. Perhaps I should search one out. This Egyptian monkey on my back will never go away! munky2

Quote:
Somehow your comment about kid's reactions reminds me of how two 5 year olds I know do dead on impression of their teachers. Pretty funny to see them mimic the intonation and the mannerisms.


Is this what these tykes do for show-and-tell? I'll bet their teachers just LOVE them. I suppose I'll be seeing them one day on the Comedy Channel.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 2:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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.... support groups for people like us. Perhaps I should search one out.


Search one out? Haven't you found one here at ED? Wink

<It's cheaper than therapy. Or so I've heard......>
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 2:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Search one out? Haven't you found one here at ED?


Is that what Egyptian Dreams is really all about? Why haven't you or Kevin posted anything about the 12 Steps?

Come on, now. Be honest. Egyptian Dreams is obviously a sinister ploy to keep people like us addicted. The more we talk about ancient Egypt, the greater the fix we need.

I think I can feel that monkey multiplying!
munky2 munky2 munky2 munky2 munky2 munky2 munky2 munky2 munky2 snorting munky2 munky2 munky2

I don't know what the pig is doing in there. He's considered "unclean."
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anneke
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 4:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Twisted Evil Twisted Evil You're on to me (and most likely Kevin) Twisted Evil

Egyptian addiction plus the evil dancing animals...




Oh well, it's nothing that 20 years of therapy won't fix Laughing
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's the dancing hippo I mentioned Anneke! Very Happy

Maybe we should start up Egyptaholics Anonymous...'my name is Isisinacrisis and I'm an Egyptaholic' Laughing
Thing is, I don't ever want to stop being one. I think what I need as a treatment is a trip to Egypt. Wink That could, of course make the addiction worse though...
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anneke
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The hippo and the croc are from Fantasia. That's a really funny bit they did. All off Fantasia was rather brilliantly done I think.

And I agree. Egyptophile, egyptoholic, etc. all applies, and I have no desire to make a change Very Happy

Nilophile has a certain ring to it too Very Happy
Mummy-madness-maniac? Laughing
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2005 4:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really like "Nile-o-phile." It does sound nice. How about Kmt-crazed? Dizzy for Deshret? When you see an extremely well-preserved mummy, you could call it mummy-licious. And when some Pyramidiot refers to ancient Egyptian religion as satanic, you could throw a temple-tantrum.

I'll shut up now.
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