Go to the Egyptian Dreams shop
Egyptian Dreams
Ancient Egypt Discussion Board
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Tomb of Seal-bearer Ptahemwi found in Saqqara

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Egyptian Dreams Forum Index -> Evidence from Amarna
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
anneke
Queen of Egypt
Queen of Egypt


Joined: 23 Jan 2004
Posts: 9305

PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 5:18 pm    Post subject: Tomb of Seal-bearer Ptahemwi found in Saqqara Reply with quote

The Dutch team working in Saqqara discovered this Akhenaten era tomb.

http://www.reuters.com/article/scienceNews/idUSL1419048020070214

http://www.metimes.com/storyview.php?StoryID=20070214-093607-8491r

The Dutch team had previously found the tomb of the priest Meryre/Meryneith.
I remember reading that during excavations they had reported the existence of another tomb in the same area. I wonder if this is it.

I have never heard of a seal-bearer named Ptah-em-wi(a?).
The Ptah name is rather interesting as well.

The reports mention "scenes of monkeys picking and eating fruit" Very Happy

Also see the Digging Diary pages from Leiden University. There are weekly reports about the excavation!

http://www.let.leidenuniv.nl/saqqara/Excavation/Digging%20Diaries/2007.htm
_________________
Math and Art: http://mathematicsaroundus.blogspot.com/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rozette
Vizier
Vizier


Joined: 21 Jul 2005
Posts: 1185
Location: Belguim

PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting information about the newly discovered Akhenaten era tomb.


In the desert of Saqqara necropolis, on the eastern side of Meryneith's tomb, a mission from Leiden Museum and University has unearthed an Amarna tomb decorated with wall paintings. The tomb consists of an open courtyard surrounded by pillars and, to the west, three cult chapels. Limestone revetment has been preserved along both the courtyard's north and east walls.

According to Maarten J Raven, head of the mission, more relief panels may be hidden under the sand still covering the base of the other walls. The bases of three limestone papyrus columns and one fluted half-column already jut from the sand.

Decorative inscriptions on the tomb walls indicate that it belonged to Ptahemwia, among whose titles are Greatly Praised of the Perfect God, Beloved of the Lord of the Two Lands and Akhenaten's Seal-Bearer.

The decoration, involving "lively scenes composed of relatively small human figures with peculiar proportions" as Raven wrote in his archaeological report, compare well with almost contemporary reliefs in the nearby tomb of Meryneith, which was likewise started during the early years of Akhenaten's reign. The reliefs have retained many of their original colours though those on the east wall and the east part of the north wall remain unfinished. Inscriptions reveal that Ptahemwia's wife Maya was the songstress of the god Amun. On the westernmost part of the tomb's north wall the couple are depicted seated on chairs receiving offerings from two priests, with relatives standing behind the chairs or else depicted in a lower register.

A relief featuring two monkeys playing beneath the chair of the tomb owner's wife is, says Hawas, the most vivid depiction found inside the tomb.

Scenes involving Ptahemwia are spread across the tomb's walls. The most detailed shows Ptahemwia arriving home accompanied by his Nubian guards, charioteer and sandal-bearer. He is greeted by household officials while a servant gestures towards the open door of the house. Indoors, two attendants present a drinking vessel, a water flask and towel. Behind then are two female musicians, one of whom carries a lyre while upstairs his wife Maya is being poured a drink by another servant. To the right of the chariot waiting outside the house is a depiction of an agricultural scene.

Raven believes the tomb will contribute much to our knowledge of Memphis during the Amarna period. Ptahemwia is already known from a pilaster panel in Bologna and a door jamb in the Egyptian Museum.

Link picture :
Quote Anneke :
The reports mention "scenes of monkeys picking and eating fruit"

http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2007/832/home01.jpg

http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2007/832/eg8.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rozette
Vizier
Vizier


Joined: 21 Jul 2005
Posts: 1185
Location: Belguim

PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Update : Digging Diary pages from Leiden University
Digging Diary 2007:
February 16

http://www.let.leidenuniv.nl/saqqara/Excavation/Digging%20Diaries/2007.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Egyptian Dreams Forum Index -> Evidence from Amarna All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group