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Photos of artefacts at the British Museum
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2008 3:43 pm    Post subject: Photos of artefacts at the British Museum Reply with quote

The following are some photos from my recent trip to the British Museum. Unfortunately, at the moment the British museum have part of their Egyptian exhibits closed because they’re changing one of their galleries, so some of the artefacts I wanted to see weren’t on display (fragment of a man holding a duck from the tomb of Itet, the Dream book owned by both Qenherkhepshef and Amennakht, Nesperennub, and the Gayer Anderson cat), but there was still plenty to photograph. Enjoy! Very Happy

Okay, so we start with a faïence ushabti of Sethy I.

I looked out specifically for this next piece due to this thread. It’s a fragment of painted plaster (man feeding an antelope) from the 4th dynasty tomb of Itet. She was the wife of Neferma’at, who was a vizier during the reign of Sneferu. I was completely amazed by how large and beautifully coloured this fragment was.

Here are two photos of a statue of the Kushite princess, Amenirdis. She was the daughter of Kashta and became Divine Adoratrice of Amun. Link & link.

This next piece is called the hunter’s pallete. It’s from Naqada III, and is made from grey mudstone.

This photo is of a Late Predynastic man with grave goods.

This is a wooden model of butchers preparing meat.

I found this next piece particularly pretty. The colours and detailing are amazing (sorry about the flash)! It’s a wooden model funerary boat dating to the 12th dynasty.

These statues are a little larger than ‘life-size’ and are made from sycamore fig. On the left is Ramses IX, and on the right is Ramses I.

Next is a piece from the Book of the Dead papyrus belonging to Ani. I’ve been to the British Museum twice before and always wondered why I’d missed this artefact. Now I know why. The papyrus has been separated into sections (by Budge), and these sections aren’t even displayed together. Surprised Random excerpts from the Book of the Dead belonging to various different people are all jumbled up at the back of different display cases to do with burial, so they’re quite hard to locate (I’m personally convinced that not all pieces of Ani’s text are even on display, unless they are in the closed gallery). Anyway, here’s the piece I got a picture of. It contains Chapters 155, 156, 29B, and 166, which describe the function of the four important amulets that are to be placed on the mummy, with instructions on what material they were to be made out of, and their preparation and positioning on the body. The amulets in question are the djed pillar, ankh, heart, and headrest. From the 19th dynasty. Here’s a side angle of that same piece.

The next artefact is a bronze offering table with ritual vessels which belongs to the lector priest, Idy. 6th dynasty, Abydos. Anyone have any ideas as to what the inscription reads across the front of the piece?

Next we have a bronze incense burner from the Ptolemaic Period, Saqqara. If you look below the burner you will see the incense tongs, too.

The two artefacts in the following photo were particularly beautiful; both for their intricate design. Above is a mummified ibis with appliqué figure of the god Nefertum, from the south ibis catacombs in north Saqqara, dating to the Ptolemaic Period. Below is a gilded wooden and bronze coffin for the mummy of an ibis, again from the Ptolemaic Period.

This bronze mask is for a mummified cat and is from the Ptolemaic Period.

Statue of Sekhmet, 1370 BC. From the front and at an angle.

The cartouche depicted in this picture was right on the top shelf of a display case by the ceiling, so it was very difficult to shoot and took a lot of zooming in. It didn’t have a card explaining the artefact, but it looks to me to say “Userma’atra-Setepenra, Ramses-Meryamun” (titles of Ramses II), though the extra gods - Ptah and Sekhmet (??) - and the red crown are unusual in this set-up. I don’t know if the presence of these characters in the cartouche changes the translation or meaning in any way??

The next artefact is a red breccia statue of Khaemwaset, son of Ramses II, from Asyut.

A black granite stone of the Kushite pharaoh, Shabaka, is shown in the following two pictures: Front view and at an angle. Sometimes called the “Philosophy of a Memphite Priest,” but more often referred to as the “Shabaka Stone,” it’s from Memphis and contains an inscription about how Ptah created the world: Ptah thought it, spoke it on his tongue, and then it came into being. At the start of the text Shabaka relates that this is a copy of an ancient text that he has restored. It was once a round-topped stela with inscription over the whole thing, but in the 19th century some farmers discovered the stone, re-cut it, and used it as a grindstone. That’s why there’s a hole in the middle and wear around the centre, but if you look closely you can still make out some of the text at the outer edges of the stone.

Here is a black basalt sarcophagus that belonged to Nakhthorheb II (Nectanebo II), which contains excerpts from the Imyduat/Amduat. It was discovered at Alexandria, but had been reused as a bath, probably in the Middle Ages; it contains holes all the way around the bottom of the sarcophagus that had been created in the sarcophagus so that plugs could be inserted into the holes when it was full of water, and be removed to empty the water after use. If you click on the image below you can see a video clip that I got of the sarcophagus so you can view the holes in the bottom and the decoration:



This red granite sarcophagus lid struck me as very peculiar-looking. It may not be evident from the photo, but there’s something odd about the shape of the nose and mouth that doesn’t look very “ancient Egyptian” at all, to me. It belongs to the 19th dynasty Viceroy of Kush, Seteau (Giovanni Belzoni, 1817).

Well, this one I doubt needs any introduction: The Rosetta Stone.

Two views of a limestone slab belonging to Nefershesempepy from the Late Old Kingdom, 2150 BC (front-facing and at an angle). The figure’s thinness and style of hieroglyphs are typical of the Late Old Kingdom. Slabs like these were often placed in niches in the walls of mastabas, but Nefershesempepy’s were stacked against the wall of a chamber, which is why his slabs have survived in such good condition.

A 5th dynasty false door belonging to Bateti: link.

Here is a picture of a fragment of the beard from the Great Sphinx at Giza.

Limestone female seated shinx, Roman Period.

Next, there’s a black granite sacred boat of Mutemwia; 18th dynasty wife of Djehutymes IV.

Here’s a statue of Senenmut and Neferura. 18th dynasty, Thebes, Karnak.

Inscribed with the names of Divine Adoratrices of Amun, Amenirdis I & Shepenwepet II, this bronze door hinge I found very unusual.

A tomb painting depicting Nubians is here from Sobekhotep’s tomb-chapel at Thebes.

In this photo you can see flint tools on the top shelf, flint scrapers at the bottom left, and flint hand-axes at the bottom right. All Palaeolithic from Thebes.

A figure of a woman carved from hippopotamus ivory is shown here. Badarian.

Next is a beautifully decorated ushabti box showing the deceased and her ba receiving food from Nut. 19th dynasty.

Here is a 21st dynasty version of a portion of the Imyduat/Amduat written on papyrus, belonging to Nesmutaaneru.

Ushabti of Ramses II.

The next photo is of a wooden model of a granary from Thebes, 12th dynasty.

Here are two photos of a painted wooden statue of a man using a hoe (link and link). 6th dynasty, Asyut, tomb 45.

These are funerary sandals made of cedar wood with leather straps coated in plaster.

The following artefact I got four photos of, as I tried to get it from as many angles as possible to show it in the best light. It’s a tamarisk statue - with the base of cedar wood - of a turtle-headed god from the tomb (57 in the Valley of the Kings) of the 18th dynasty pharaoh, Horemheb. I’d never personally heard of a turtle-headed deity in ancient Egypt before now, but the accompanying text at the British Museum says that turtles were often considered hostile and the enemy of Ra: Photo one & photo two & photo three & photo four.

Here is the beautifully painted coffin case (at centre) of “God’s Father of Amun,” Bakenmut, from the 21st dynasty, Bab el-Gasus, 40.

Here is a limestone stela with a figure of Intef leaning on a staff.

For the next photo there wasn’t any information on the artefact at the museum, but I believe I’ve seen depictions of them on papyrus. It’s a kind of idealised pyramid, but if anyone knows more about this piece, let me know. Wink Here’s the artefact in question.

A painted wooden outer coffin of ‘Prophet of Montu,’ Hor, from the 25th dynasty, Thebes is in the next two photos: Front and back.

In this photo you can see a vignette papyrus of a woman named Tentosorkon. 22nd dynasty.

Next we have a corn mummy in a wooden coffin from the Ptolemaic Period, Tihna el-Gabal.

Wooden painted coffin of Itineb, 26th dynasty, Saqqara.

For the next picture there’s a set of faïence amulets making up a winged scarab.

The last photo I have here depict what I believe to be some magic wands, though there wasn’t actually any text accompanying these artefacts at the museum itself.

I’ll finish off this post by showing a couple of postcards I purchased whilst I was at the British Museum…

Statue of a falcon-headed god, possibly Horus, from the Third Intermediate Period or Late Period. Silver, originally gilded, with lapis lazuli:



Egyptian statue of a seated cat, probably made to represent the goddess Bastet. Bronze with gold earrings, silvered collar, and a silver wadjet eye amulet. It is known as the Gayer-Anderson cat after the person that donated it to the museum. Saqqara, Late Period:



Close-up of the above sculpture:


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Khuy-n-inpw
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2008 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for posting these images, Daughter of Seti - theyre beautiful.

Razz
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2008 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're welcome, Khuy-n-inpw. I'm glad you like them! pharaohthumb
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2008 9:44 pm    Post subject: Re: Photos of artefacts at the British Museum Reply with quote

Thanks for sharing those! May I use some of them on my website?

Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
The cartouche depicted in this picture was right on the top shelf of a display case by the ceiling, so it was very difficult to shoot and took a lot of zooming in. It didn’t have a card explaining the artefact, but it looks to me to say “Userma’atra-Setepenra, Ramses-Meryamun” (titles of Ramses II), though the extra gods - Ptah and Sekhmet (??) - and the red crown are unusual in this set-up. I don’t know if the presence of these characters in the cartouche changes the translation or meaning in any way??

I can't answer your question, but yes it looks to me like Usermaat-Re Setepenre is written on the left and Ramesses is written on the right.

There is an egg to the bottom left of Ptah and that made me wonder if he was trying to imply he was a "son" of Ptah and Sekhmet?

If someone would force me to make a guess I would guess that this inscription could come from the temple of Ptah in Memphis and that Ramesses was connecting himself to the two most prominent deities there?


Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
This red granite sarcophagus lid struck me as very peculiar-looking. It may not be evident from the photo, but there’s something odd about the shape of the nose and mouth that doesn’t look very “ancient Egyptian” at all, to me. It belongs to the 19th dynasty Viceroy of Kush, Seteau (Giovanni Belzoni, 1817).


Very Happy Yes that one is strange isn't it. It has also always struck me as rather short and squat in stature. It made me wonder if it was produced in Nubia. They had a somewhat different style there.

Other than that it almost looks fake doesn't it?
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 6:18 am    Post subject: Re: Photos of artefacts at the British Museum Reply with quote

First of all, I want to say thank you very much D_o_S for these pictures. They're beautiful. So, I'll say it: Thank you very much.

As for the cartouche, this is the first time I've ever seen both birth name and throne name in the same cartouche. Is that a practice done elsewhere as well?

anneke wrote:


Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
The cartouche depicted ... looks to me to say “Userma’atra-Setepenra, Ramses-Meryamun” (titles of Ramses II), though the extra gods - Ptah and Sekhmet (??) - and the red crown are unusual in this set-up. I don’t know if the presence of these characters in the cartouche changes the translation or meaning in any way??

I can't answer your question, but yes it looks to me like Usermaat-Re Setepenre is written on the left and Ramesses is written on the right.

There is an egg to the bottom left of Ptah and that made me wonder if he was trying to imply he was a "son" of Ptah and Sekhmet?


Anneke's guess that the egg and Ptah are related in the way she describes and also suggestive of the original provenance, strikes me as brilliant. But then I've come to expect that from her. I regard her as a treasure all by herself. I'm really not trying to gain points here, I just needed to say it. Questions: as the son of Ptah and Sekhmet, would that associate Rameses with Nefertum and how would that association, if real, apply to Rameses?

Other things about the glyphs in the cartouche: the word Rameses is broken in two by the mry-Amun glyphs. So it appears that composition trumped context. In the same vein, even though it's a long way away from the stp glyph, I automatically read the crown as part of the stp-n-ra construction, that is: as the 'n' genitival adjective. I don't know if that's right, but that would isolate and draw attention to Ptah, Sekhmet, and the egg as the only glyphs not involved in a spelling. Ptah faces the throne name and Sekhmet faces the birth name. I can draw inferences from that. And on the left hand side, the stp...ra signs are slightly closer to the center of the cartouche and therefore greet the eye first. I find that unusual, too. More composition trumps?

Anyhow, thanks, again, Daughter_of_Seti, you're a treasure, too.

And now I think I'm done buttering people up for awhile.

Bob
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Photos of artefacts at the British Museum Reply with quote

anneke wrote:
Thanks for sharing those! May I use some of them on my website?

Of course you can, Anneke. You're more than welcome! Very Happy

anneke wrote:
If someone would force me to make a guess I would guess that this inscription could come from the temple of Ptah in Memphis and that Ramesses was connecting himself to the two most prominent deities there?

I'd never even noticed the egg hieroglyph before, but your idea of Ramses II trying to associate himself as the offspring of Ptah and Sekhmet is interesting. I bet you're right that it came from Memphis.

anneke wrote:
Other than that it almost looks fake doesn't it?

That's exactly what I thought when I saw it at the British Museum. Possibly, it was made in Nubia, but the Nubians usually tended to be good at replicating the Egyptian style art, whereas that sarchophagus just seems so much like a 'practice run.' Laughing

BobManske wrote:
First of all, I want to say thank you very much D_o_S for these pictures...As for the cartouche, this is the first time I've ever seen both birth name and throne name in the same cartouche. Is that a practice done elsewhere as well?

I seem to think I've seen that done before; where a single cartouche is used for a pharaoh's throne name and birth name, but I can't recall where I've seen it or which pharaoh it was that did it. Idea And, you're welcome about the photos; I really don't get much chance to share Egypt-related photos with the good folks at ED, but when I do I try to get as much as possible. Laughing
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 5:09 pm    Post subject: Re: Photos of artefacts at the British Museum Reply with quote

Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
Next we have a corn mummy in a wooden coffin from the Ptolemaic Period, Tihna el-Gabal.


I love corn mummies this one is beautiful. Very Happy
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:31 pm    Post subject: Re: Photos of artefacts at the British Museum Reply with quote

Shepenmut wrote:
I love corn mummies this one is beautiful.

It's actually the first corn mummy I've ever seen before, or at least, the first one I've ever taken any notice of.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2008 12:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whoohoo! Awesome photos, Daughter_Of_SETI! notworthy

LOL Something makes me think you had a wee bit of fun at the B.M. I can only imagine what it must've been like. Well, the next time you're going there, make sure to take ME with you. Remember your poor little kmt_sesh. Pray

Seriously, I envy you. I've always wanted so badly to tour the Egyptian galleries of the British Museum. Under construction or not, so much to see! The guards would have to drag me out of there.

Quote:
I looked out specifically for this next piece due to this thread. It’s a fragment of painted plaster (man feeding an antelope) from the 4th dynasty tomb of Itet. She was the wife of Neferma’at...


I remember that old thread about Nefermaat's tomb. That's a beautiful fragment from Itet's tomb and it's amazing how well the pigment has been preserved. The antelope is very well done (I've always been envious of how well the Egyptians drew animals). The inscription above it says rn nwDw but I'm not sure what it means. The rn part typically means "the young," as of animals, but I'm not familiar with nwDw for antelope.

Quote:
This next piece is called the hunter’s pallete. It’s from Naqada III...


Beautiful! That's a very famous palette. Isn't it something? It dates to right before state formation and even then the Egyptians were expert stoneworkers. But it's always made me wonder--how big must the purse have been in which some queen carried that? Razz

Quote:
This photo is of a Late Predynastic man with grave goods.


I remember reading about him. I think he comes from around 3,400 BCE and was found near Gebelein. He's one of the better preserved predynastic bodies. The grave is a recreation but it has beautiful pottery vessels in it.

Quote:
I found this next piece particularly pretty. The colours and detailing are amazing (sorry about the flash)! It’s a wooden model funerary boat dating to the 12th dynasty.


That's a great picture! You're sure right about the color, especially considering it's almost 4,000 years old. I like that particular type of boat model because it shows the deceased on his mummy-pilgrimage to Abydos to visit Osiris. Dynasty 12 was when the Osiris cult was really starting to take off and by which time the Egyptians believed that one of the Early Dynastic tombs at Umm el-Qaab was the burial place of Osiris (I think it was actually the tomb of Djer, from Dynasty 1).

Quote:
Anyway, here’s the piece I got a picture of. It contains Chapters 155, 156, 29B, and 166, which describe the function of the four important amulets that are to be placed on the mummy...


Wonderful pictures of Ani's text. So it really is hard to find in there, among the other papyri. You'd think Ani's would have pride of place, but the average museum goer probably wouldn't know his from any of the others. I mean, really, Budge should've been smacked for cutting it into bite-sized chunks, but even so, it's very beautiful. Thanks especially for sharing that photo!

I was just wondering, did you count the number of times a CD was drawn on that part of the text? Did you find the mouse with its cord and the CD tray? LOL Shame on me. Razz (Some reading this will wonder what in the hell I'm talking about, others will know exactly what I'm talking about.)

Quote:
Next we have a bronze incense burner from the Ptolemaic Period, Saqqara. If you look below the burner you will see the incense tongs, too.


LOL It's probably just me but a lot of those intricate Egyptian incense burners remind me of the really ornate prayer pipes carved by Native Americans. Kind of like this one.

Sorry. My mind wanders sometimes. Anxious

Quote:
The two artefacts in the following photo were particularly beautiful; both for their intricate design. Above is a mummified ibis with appliqué figure of the god Nefertum, from the south ibis catacombs in north Saqqara, dating to the Ptolemaic Period. Below is a gilded wooden and bronze coffin for the mummy of an ibis, again from the Ptolemaic Period.


Wow, that "Nefertum bundle" is particularly beautiful. Hard to believe it's that well preserved. The intricate wrappings are impressive! I wander how well preserved the ibis inside is. Someone of means had to have paid for that critter to be mummified and wrapped with such expertise.

Quote:
Statue of Sekhmet, 1370 BC. From the front and at an angle.


That is a lovely statue and I can see some hieroglyphs down the front sides of the throne, and I think there are a couple of cartouches there. Do you remember from which period this statue comes? LOL And what's with all the books? Is Sekhmet guarding them? That's one librarian I wouldn't care to tussle with! Razz

Quote:
The cartouche depicted in this picture was right on the top shelf of a display case by the ceiling, so it was very difficult to shoot and took a lot of zooming in.


You did a good job because the photo turned out really nice. I tried to do some searching for the meaning of this and couldn't find anything. It's as strange to me as it is to you, but I'd have to say anneke and BobManske provided very plausible and intelligent explanations for it.

Quote:
A black granite stone of the Kushite pharaoh, Shabaka, is shown in the following two pictures: Front view and at an angle. Sometimes called the “Philosophy of a Memphite Priest,” but more often referred to as the “Shabaka Stone,” it’s from Memphis and contains an inscription about how Ptah created the world...


That's a very famous piece, not to mention incredibly important for our understanding of the Memphite religion. Gees, you saw some incredible stuff at the B.M.! It's hard to believe the thing was used as a grindstone. Please tell me the farmers were tracked down and harshly punished for that! Pray The literature I've read on this artifact don't go into any further detail.

Quote:
Here is a black basalt sarcophagus that belonged to Nakhthorheb II (Nectanebo II), which contains excerpts from the Imyduat/Amduat. It was discovered at Alexandria, but had been reused as a bath, probably in the Middle Ages...


Another very famous piece! We have a New Kingdom sarcophagus at the Field that also eventually was used as a bathtub, but it's nowhere near as beautiful as this one. I often tell our museum visitors about the Nectanebo II sarcophagus when I'm talking to them about ours. LOL What an ignominious end to the final resting place of Egypt's last native pharaoh. I enjoyed the video, by the way. Wink

Quote:
This red granite sarcophagus lid struck me as very peculiar-looking. It may not be evident from the photo, but there’s something odd about the shape of the nose and mouth that doesn’t look very “ancient Egyptian” at all, to me.


Laughing That is very odd looking. Actually it reminds me of the boxy stone and wood coffins and sarcophagi more common to the Late Period. Did you notice how it seems to be leaning a tad to its left? It's almost as though the thing were leaning over a little to look at something in the distance.

Quote:
Well, this one I doubt needs any introduction: The Rosetta Stone.


Ah, yes. Well, you had to include that in your presentation for us! I admit I've always wanted to see it for myself. You're able to walk all the way around it, right? Am I correct in saying it's around four feet tall, or is that not right?

I hope you put your Egyptian Dreams skills to use and translated it aloud for all the other visitors. Razz

Gees, I just keep going on and on and I must be boring the hell out of everyone else! I'm going to step aside and allow someone else to post, and I'm going to take a good look at all the other photos.

But be warned, I'll probably be back to comment on more of the artifacts. Twisted Evil

These are wonderful, Daughter_Of_SETI! Thank you so much for sharing them with us!
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wink I think Kmt_sesh had as much fun looking at the photos as DOS did in taking them!! Have to say I feel the same - they are wonderful to see DOS and I'm so impressed with how much you saw. I've only visited once and had only a couple of hours, which is nothing like enough time to see this fabulous collection.
I loved seeing the boat of Mutemwia - What a beautiful piece of workmanship.
And the statue of Khaemweset I'd not seen before so that was great.
It was also fun seeing the Palaeolithic finds from Luxor. I'd read of items of this age being found at sites on the west bank but not seen any examples. These type of artifacts always seem to look like just any old chunk of rock to me and I'm impressed how people can identify them as actually being something.
Very Happy Thanks for posting such great photos DOS I've had a lovely time looking at them
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 2:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
I was just wondering, did you count the number of times a CD was drawn on that part of the text? Did you find the mouse with its cord and the CD tray? LOL Shame on me.

Yes, “shame on you” is quite right! Some of us believe in that stuff, you know! Surprised Actually, I did look for modern technology in the Ani papyrus and couldn’t find any, but if you look closely at the vignette papyrus later in that post you can just make out a DJ playing some banging tunes and an iPod near by. Razz

kmt_sesh wrote:
Wow, that "Nefertum bundle" is particularly beautiful. Hard to believe it's that well preserved. The intricate wrappings are impressive! I wander how well preserved the ibis inside is. Someone of means had to have paid for that critter to be mummified and wrapped with such expertise.

I don’t recall there being any information at the British Museum on the state of the mummified animal inside the wrappings, but it’s more than likely that the mummified remains have never been scanned before. Seeing as it’s Ptolemaic, there could literally be anything inside those beautiful wrappings: leg of an ibis, some shaped mud, a few twigs, a dead mouse, or perhaps the preserved remains of a lost Mickey Mouse?!

kmt_sesh wrote:
That is a lovely [Sekhmet] statue and I can see some hieroglyphs down the front sides of the throne, and I think there are a couple of cartouches there. Do you remember from which period this statue comes?

Hmm, was my “Statue of Sekhmet, 1370 BC quote from above not clear enough for you? Razz #Rofl Razz In other words, the statue is dated to 1370 BC, the reign of Amenhotep III. From his Mortuary Temple at Thebes, it was one of the 730 statues he had constructed there (two statues for each day of the year; in half of them she was depicted seated, like in the photo I showed you, and in the other half she was standing).

kmt_sesh wrote:
LOL And what's with all the books? Is Sekhmet guarding them? That's one librarian I wouldn't care to tussle with!

pharaohlol That statue is in the Enlightenment Room, and I’d often wondered myself in the past what all the books were about. I took a better look at them this time I was there, which seemed to be mostly poetry, but it didn’t explain why they were there. I just checked out the British Museum website which states the following:
“The Enlightenment was an age of reason and learning that flourished across Europe and America from about 1680 to 1820. This rich and diverse permanent exhibition uses thousands of objects to demonstrate how people in Britain understood their world during this period. It is housed in the King’s Library, the former home of the library of King George III.”
So, it would seem that it is some sort of library. At least if Sekhmmet were in charge of public libraries, no-one would dare to ever take their books back late! Wink

kmt_sesh wrote:
That is very odd looking. Actually it reminds me of the boxy stone and wood coffins and sarcophagi more common to the Late Period. Did you notice how it seems to be leaning a tad to its left? It's almost as though the thing were leaning over a little to look at something in the distance.

I didn’t notice that, no. But it’s possible that the only reason that it looks as if it’s leaning, is that the photo was taken wonky, or something? I promise that I hadn’t been on the Piña Coladas before getting that picture, though. Embarassed LOL If it really is leaning over to get a look at something in the distance, then it’s looking at something quite beautiful, as that sarcophagus come bath is right opposite it.

kmt_sesh wrote:
Ah, yes. Well, you had to include that in your presentation for us! I admit I've always wanted to see it for myself. You're able to walk all the way around it, right? Am I correct in saying it's around four feet tall, or is that not right?

Every time I go to the British Museum, the Rosetta Stone is being displayed differently. The first time, it was in the open for people to touch and see without any barriers, the second time, it was in a small low down display case, and now it’s in a large display case lifted up to eye-level. You’ve always been able to see all the way around the piece, but when it was in the small case I think it was tilted back slightly, so it was kind of difficult to see the back properly. The way they have it now is by far the best (maybe they decided to lock it up in a huge display case to keep Hawass from sneaking off with it!). God knows how tall the piece is, but your guess of four foot sounds about right, to me.

Sesen wrote:
I've only visited once and had only a couple of hours, which is nothing like enough time to see this fabulous collection.

I actually went to the British Museum on two separate days during my stay in London, which is why I was able to get so many pictures. One day just isn’t enough, especially if you have any interest in seeing the rest of their artefacts from other cultures, too.

Sesen wrote:
It was also fun seeing the Palaeolithic finds from Luxor. I'd read of items of this age being found at sites on the west bank but not seen any examples. These type of artifacts always seem to look like just any old chunk of rock to me and I'm impressed how people can identify them as actually being something.

I enjoyed seeing the Palaeolithic tools as well. I agree that it’s just amazing how the archaeologists can recognise a piece of stone that’s been chipped to make a tool, as opposed to a stone that has naturally become chipped and therefore just rubbish. Those pieces look like nothing, but it’s fantastic the kind of things that they were used for, and shows just how ingenious those ancient folk really were!

Thanks, Kmt_sesh and Sesen for your great comments. I’m glad you both enjoyed the photos! Very Happy
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 8:08 pm    Post subject: Re: Photos of artefacts at the British Museum Reply with quote

Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
The next artefact is a bronze offering table with ritual vessels which belongs to the lector priest, Idy. 6th dynasty, Abydos. Anyone have any ideas as to what the inscription reads across the front of the piece?

I suppose you've already realised that the inscription on the right is a mirror image of the one on the left.

I think it might say:

prt-xrw pt sanx ddt Xr-Hb jdj
“An offering invocation, that the sky preserves and gives, (for) the lector-priest.... Idy.”

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is a beautiful piece. I was admiring it earlier today. I'm at work right now (goofing off!) and don't have any of my books with me, but were I to attempt a translation I might put it this way:

prt-xrw t Hnqt nt[=f] s.anx smr[-wa]t Xry-Hb(t) idi

"A voice offering of bread and beer, (that) I am made to live; the sole companion and lector priest, Idy."

It's possible there's more to the name than "Idy." There's a little glyph right below the "d" (hand) but I can't quite make out for certain what it is. Smile
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks to you both. Very Happy
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks to you for showing them to us! I still plan to post some more comments or questions when I have more time.

When will I have more time? Man, we need longer weekends and shorter work weeks! Sad
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