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Interesting Akhenaten pictures
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Osiris II
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is always fakes found, but the identification is based mostly on the style, which is positively post-Amarna.
As far as I know, there is no inscription on the piece.
Naming it as Aye is, in my opinion, just an educated guess, and if it IS Aye, then the woman in the piece is MORE THAN LIKELY his wife, Tii.
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Gerard.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm puzzle by the position of their arms which rather separate them more than unite them.
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Osiris II
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While it's true that it is a somewhat unusual image, there is nothing strange about it at all. Usually we see a king and his wife or a goddess and she has her arm at his waist. In this piece, he has his arm to hers, in other words, just reversed from what we are used to seeing.
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi together !

What do you think about that ... :



On the right an un-identified king from the workshop of Thutmosis in Amarna, now in Berlin.

Greetings,

Lutz
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Khuy-n-inpw
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Compare this statuette in the Louvre, which I believe is an accurate depiction of Akhenaten and Nefertiti:

http://www.louvre.fr/llv/oeuvres/detail_notice.jsp?CONTENT%3C%3Ecnt_id=10134198673225517&CURRENT_LLV_NOTICE%3C%3Ecnt_id=10134198673225517&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=9852723696500807&fromDept=false&baseIndex=18&bmLocale=en

Neutral
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2008 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lutz wrote:
Gerard wrote:
Lutz wrote:
It`s one part of a broken double statue of King Ay and Queen Teje, great kings wife of Amenhotep III.

On which ground it is the queen of A III and not of Ay ?

... You can read this also in Wedel, Carola: Nofretete und das Geheimnis von Amarna. - Mainz: von Zabern, 2005. - p. 38. - ISBN: 3-8053-3544-X. But the book from C.Wedel is full of such mistakes. ...

And this is another one of them from the book by C.Wedel - the 10th I found ( for 1-9 see : http://snipurl.com/2y8mh ).

Quote:
I ordered the article by Prof.Wildung and will let you know which Queen Teje he thinks she is ... Confused

Prof.Wildung is also thinking it is the wife of Aja. Allocation of the group of statues by Wildung to Aja and his wife Teje taken place for purely stylistic reasons, there are no inscriptions.

Greetings,

Lutz
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PrincessNef
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2008 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like how that scan shows how he may have looked based on that statue of him. I wonder if that is what he really looked like. Art in that time period seems to be based more on realism whereas the rest of Egyptian art seems to be based on wishful thinking on how the royal family is depicted. Smile
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kylejustin
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 06, 2008 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

there isn't any inscriptions in between the two figures is there?
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ELISE
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2009 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the figure on the left, given the youthful 'puppy fat' face is more likely to be Tutankhamen.
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Osiris II
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2009 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Behind the figures is a wide back-plate. On the reverse, two columns of hieroglyphs each bear three cartouches: the two cartouches of the sun god, followed by the king's in the left-hand column and the queen's in the right-hand column. In Egypt, the king had always acted as intermediary between gods and men. In Akhenaton's time, this role fell to the royal couple, both man and woman, and more importantly so than ever. The "discarnate" Sun was represented only by its visible manifestation - the Aten-disk - and the sovereigns were its only earthly embodiment. In religious scenes, they are therefore the only ones to receive the Sun's rays. The inscription on this statuette also establishes a close relationship between the Sun and the king and queen. Behind the king one reads: "May the Sun live, ruler of the horizon, who rejoices on the horizon as the illumination that comes from the Aten-disk, may he live forever and ever; the King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Neferkheperure-Waenre, may he live." Behind the queen, the name of the god, given in the same way, is followed by: "The great royal wife Neferneferwaten-Nefertiti, living forever and ever."

So, obviously, they are identified as Akhnaten and Nefertiti.
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kylejustin
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2009 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

if it is them, it's an unusual depicton. the carving is quite crude, no paint, and the woman isn't wearing a crown. nefertiti is always wearing some form of crown :lol:
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Robson
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2009 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It reminds me the old style depiction of Amenhotep IV/Akhenaten in the tomb of vizier Ramose (TT55), maybe providing a similarity with the chubby Amenhotep III:

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