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Sarcophagus fragments in the Strasbourg Museum

 
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Rozette
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 2:39 pm    Post subject: Sarcophagus fragments in the Strasbourg Museum Reply with quote

I'am looking for information about two sarcophagus fragments in the Strasbourg Museum.

Who was the owner of this sarcophagus? And where are these fragments orginated?

I'am hoping that someone is able to translate the text on these sarcophagus fragments Razz .

On these fragments the deceased being portrayed wearing a festive pleated linnen costume, rather than being shown as a mummy.The family of the deceased is also depicted mourning on these scenes.

This reminds me about the scenes in the Royal tomb, where Akhenaten and Nefertiti mourning their daughter Meketaten, who isn't also being shown as a mummy in these scenes.

Link : http://books.google.be/books?id=J-rIO6BBh6IC&pg=PA286&lpg=PA286&dq=Amarna+fragments+Strasbourg&source=web&ots=ViKMt6HS4u&sig=30FVriUHsmNL9FE0MR6NLDDZ0e4&hl=nl#PPA286,M1
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Aset
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sad Rozette:
Quote:
De pagina is niet beschikbaar voor weergrave of u hebt uw weergravelimiet bereikt voor dit boek
Crying or Very sad
Make a screenshot and upload it, please.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found the image in The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt By Ian Shaw on page 286.

It is a really interesting image. The scene is very Amarna-ish in style. The person on the bier looks like a man to me.

I will keep looking for more info. So far no luck Confused
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Rozette
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aset,

I posted a picture of the two sarcophagus fragments.
http://users.skynet.be/super_novatje/Afbeelding%20415.jpg


Anneke,

Do you have the book "The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt By Ian Shaw"?
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No I don't have the Oxford Dictionary. I just thought it would help people if they wanted to look it up on google books.

It would be interesting to read about the provenance. I think only one tomb in Amarna was ever used?
Another possibility is one of the Amarna period tombs in Saqqara.

I also cannot make out any names on the fragment.

The comment that the deceased is no longer depicted as a mummy but as a richly dressed person is rather interesting.

I think there are 19th dynasty coffins that show the deceased richly dressed - not as a mummy. Similarly there are shabtis showing the deceased as a nicely dressed nobleman. This may be something that change during the Amarna period then?
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2008 12:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I think only one tomb in Amarna was ever used?


The royal tomb?
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2008 2:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're right conorp, the royal tomb was used. Not sure how I managed to forget that one! I meant one non-royal tomb Smile
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Rozette
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2008 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote Anneke :
Quote:
The comment that the deceased is no longer depicted as a mummy but as a richly dressed person is rather interesting.


This is probably one of the funerary customs that was changed during the Amarna period.
I'am currently re-reading Erik Hornung book "Akhenaten and the religion of Light".

Hornung writes that the Amarna funerary beliefs without an actual hereafter are most interesting. In the early stage of the Amarna doctrine the attitude to Osiris is most reserved, which shows a change leaving no room for Osiris. In a religion of light the dark side of the world is a problem. The dark phase is now no longer the regeneration time of light, but simply its absence; the waking up of the dead into new life does not take place in the Netherworld, but in morning at sunrise, together with the living world. The orientation is east; the west has vanished. The Hereafter, the Netherworld does not exist anymore; the world of the dead is not distinct from that of the living, and is situated in the Aton temple of Akhetaton; temple and palace represent the new world of the dead. The ba of people buried elsewhere would head for some, or the, Aton temple, to participate in the offerings and the presence of the king. However, funerary customs such as the shabti are retained, but on the royal sarcophagus, e.g., the protective goddesses are replaced by the queen. Furthermore, the grace of the king substitutes the judgment of the dead. In short, at night the dead sleep, and during the day they accompany Aton, the king and his family to the great temple, where they receive the provisions. Aton, "gone away" in the night, is settled in the heart of the king, his abode.

He also writes that Akhenaten's funerary customs were imitated.

The coffin of Taat from Deir el-Medina is an important, although thus far unique, attestation of this, on the coffin of this woman the protective deities are replaced by members of the deceased's familily.
The coffin of this woman was found in pit tomb 1352 (West Cemeteries Deir el-Medina), together with the coffin of Setau, Servant in the place of Truth (Amenhotep IV).

I was hoping to find more information about the coffin of Taat , but I couldn't find anything about it.
I only found a reference to it in the book of Hornung.
R. Hari in "Studien zu Sprache und Religion Ägyptens. Zu Ehren von Wolfhart Westendorf überreicht von seinen Freunden und Schülern, Göttingen, 1984, p 1053.
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Gerard.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2008 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rozette wrote:
Do you have the book "The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt By Ian Shaw"?
I do, but there is no details on these fragments. I just sent a query on a french forum to learn more about it.
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Rozette
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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2009 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found a fragment of a sarcophagus in the Museo dell'Opera della Primaziale in Pisa inv. no. 63 that belongs together with the three fragments in Strasbourg.
The four fragments are part of a sarcophagus usurped by the "Overseer of the Treasury of the Lord of the Two Lands, Thutmosi".

I also discoverd that the three Strasbourg fragments were purchased in Thebes (1903) by Spiegelberg W. for the Strasbourg Museum.


Strasbourg fragment 3


Pisa inv. no. 63
The Pisa fragment was found during the Franco-Toscane expedition en Egypt et en Nubie between 1828-1829.



Many thanks to Daniele Salvoldi (Università di Pisa) for helping me finding the article by GALLO, Paolo about the Pisa and Strasbourg fragments.
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