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King Tut's mask

 
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Frater0082
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 2:03 am    Post subject: King Tut's mask Reply with quote

Hey did anyone look at king Tut's mask and the carnopic jar image of Kiya and thought they look almost the same.

If im right but wasnt Kiya's funerary material reused ?
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neseret
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:25 am    Post subject: Re: King Tut's mask Reply with quote

Frater0082 wrote:
Hey did anyone look at king Tut's mask and the carnopic jar image of Kiya and thought they look almost the same.


Sadly, most everyone "looked the same" during the Amarna period: it became the style to pattern the image after that of the king (in most cases, and sometimes, the Great Royal Wife. I would not take the "similarity" of features to be more than simply "Amarna style."

Frater0082 wrote:
If im right but wasnt Kiya's funerary material reused ?


The canopic jars, which had the erased names of Kiya, were found in KV 55. It's been theorised - by Allen, as I recall - that Kiya's name appeared originally, then was erased and that of an Amarna royal (probably male) placed atop her glyphs. It was probably at that time that the royal uraeus (cobra) was added to the brow of the canopic jar heads. However, these and the royal name/s were later removed such that no name remains on the canopic jars at all.

The canopic jars and their relation to KV 55 has been discussed in the following publications:

Bell, M. R. 1990. An Armchair Excavation of KV 55. JARCE 27: 97-137.

Davis, T. M., Ed. 1990 <1910>. The Tomb of Queen Tiyi. San Francisco: KMT Communications.

Dodson, A. 1992. KV 55 and the end of the reign of Akhenaten. In VI Congresso Internationale di Egittologia., (1): 135-9. Turin: International Association of Egyptologists.

Helck, W. 2001. Das Grab Nr. 55 im Königsgräbertal. Seine Inhalt und seine historische Bedeutung. Sonderschrift/Deustches Archäologisches Institut Abteilung Kairo 29. Mainz: von Zabern.

Maspero, G. 1908. New Light on Ancient Egypt. E. Lee. London: T. Fisher Unwin.

Perepelkin, G. 1978. The Secret of the Gold Coffin. Moscow: Nauka Publishing House/USSR Academy of Sciences.

Smith, J. L. and C. Smith. 1956. Tombs, Temples and Ancient Art. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

Weigall, A. 1934. The Life and Times of Akhnaton, King of Egypt. London: Thorton Butterworth, Ltd.

Wilson, J. A. 1976. Mrs. Andrews and the 'Tomb of Queen Tiyi.'. In Studies in Honor of George R. Hughes. January 12, 1977: 273-9. Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization, SAOC 39. Chicago: Oriental Institute.
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karnsculpture
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The closest likeness I've seen is this piece (part of the mask from a coffin) in the collection of the British Museum:[/img]http://www.britishmuseum.org/collectionimages/AN00408/AN00408352_001_l.jpg[/img]

and the face on Tutankhamun's solid gold coffin:

[img]http://www.corbisimages.com/images/Corbis-42-24660165.jpg?size=67&uid=68fed9a9-b2d6-4651-880a-bad0c936fb2a[/img]

The piece in the British Museum was purchased from the estate of Somerset Lowry-Corry, 2nd Earl of Belmore in 1843, although it's provenance is not known (as far as I have been able to find), it is clearly the work of an artist from the same workshop as produced several of the key pieces from Tutankhamun's tomb. The coffin mask in the British Museum collection is just over life-size, so smaller than Tutankhamun's 3rd coffin mask.

Paul[/img]
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karnsculpture
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Answering my own question here, it is likely that the coffin mask was found by Belzoni who was the 2nd Earl of Belmore's main agent in Egypt.
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Coffin - Fitting" (London, British Museum EA 6885)

karnsculpture wrote:
... it is clearly the work of an artist from the same workshop as produced several of the key pieces from Tutankhamun's tomb. ...

Here I have my doubts. Specifically, the shape of the eyes suggest a dating before year 30 in the reign of Amenhotep III (1st sed - fest). They do not have the typical almond shape, that the eyes of the gold coffin with his slightly closed eyelids clearly have.

Greetings, Lutz.
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neseret
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lutz wrote:
"Coffin - Fitting" (London, British Museum EA 6885)

karnsculpture wrote:
... it is clearly the work of an artist from the same workshop as produced several of the key pieces from Tutankhamun's tomb. ...

Here I have my doubts. Specifically, the shape of the eyes suggest a dating before year 30 in the reign of Amenhotep III (1st sed - fest). They do not have the typical almond shape, that the eyes of the gold coffin with his slightly closed eyelids clearly have.


I would have to agree with Lutz here: the BM item is definitely from the Amenhotep III era, due not only to the "almond-shaped" eye (which, as Lutz indicated, is a hallmark of Amenhotep III), but the fact the eyes are double-lined, which squarely places it in the so-called "youthful" period of the post 3rd jubilee period of that king.

On the issue of eye shape and the "double line" indicating a late period in the reign of Amenhotep III, see

Berman, L. M., Ed. 1990. The Art of Amenhotep III: Art Historical Analysis. Cleveland: Cleveland Museum of Art.

Johnson, W. R. 1998. Monuments and Monumental Art under Amenhotep III: Evolution and Meaning. In D. O'Connor and E. H. Cline, Eds., Amenhotep III: Perspectives on His Reign: 63-94. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Kozloff, A. P., et al. 1992. Egypt's Dazzling Sun: Amenhotep III and His World. Cleveland: Cleveland Museum of Art.

On the stylistic differences between Amenhotep III period art and that of the Amarna period, see:

Müller, M. 1988. Die Kunst Amenophis' III und Echnatons. Basel: Verlag für Ägyptologie.

HTH.
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