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Akhenaten and Rib-Hadda

 
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Nefer-Ankhe
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 8:51 am    Post subject: Akhenaten and Rib-Hadda Reply with quote

Why didn't Akhenaten help Rib-Hadda?
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This article could be of some interest...

Violetta Cordani : Aziru's Journey to Egypt and its Chronological Value. - In: Egypt and the Near East - the Crossroads. - [Proceedings of an International Conference on the Relations of Egypt and the Near East in the bronze Age, Prague, September 1-3, 2010]. - Prague, 2011. - pp. 103 - 116.

Greetings, Lutz.
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Nefer-Ankhe
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PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 4:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good source, however it didn't really go into depth at all about why Akhenaten didn't help Rib-Hadda, unless I missed it?
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SidneyF
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PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 3:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Akhenaten and Rib-Hadda Reply with quote

Nefer-Ankhe wrote:
Why didn't Akhenaten help Rib-Hadda?


My guess is that Akhenaten was putting his money on Aziru, Rib-Hadda's enemy, and didn't care about the fate of Rib-Hadda. However, it began to look like the king of Egypt had backed the wrong guy and Aziru fell under suspicion. He was ordered to come to Egypt and thus went, although fearful of his reception. Everyone was accusing Aziru of being a traitor to Akhenaten--and he probably was.
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Robson
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PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2014 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You mean, by saying that Aziru's cohorts are "freedom fighters" or something of sorts?
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SidneyF
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PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2014 3:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Robson wrote:
You mean, by saying that Aziru's cohorts are "freedom fighters" or something of sorts?


I wouldn't say that. The ones who were the real "freedom fighters", if you want to look at it that way, were the Apiru. They killed all the lords of Canaan who were loyal to the pharaoh.
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Nefer-Ankhe
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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, I just got confused! Can someone please give me a basic run down, as to who was fighting for who and what?
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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wrote "freedom fighters" ironically in brackets exactly in reference to what it means for the US imperialist politics, in particular during Reagan's government, specially applied to the Afghani Mujahideen and the Nicaraguan Contras.
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nadav Naaman : Looking for the Pharaohs Judgement. - In: Revue d'Assyriologie et d'archéologie orientale 90.2. - 1996. - pp. 145 - 159:
Quote:
"Abstract: The article discusses two episodes in which Rib-Hadda of Byblos requested an intervention and judgment (dïnu) by the Pharaoh. The fïrst appeal was made after a coup d'État in Tyre, in which his brother and his brother-in-law, the ruler of Tyre, with his wife and children, were killed (EA 89). A second request for a royal décision was made when the ruler of Beirut confiscated two Byblian ships, probably to collect an unpaid debt (EA 105, 113). The chain of events of the two episodes is reconstructed in détail, and Rib Hadda's cunning diplomatie manipulations are made clear, partly by new readings suggested for difficult passages (in particular, letters EA 85, 89, 105, 120, 143). The Pharaoh's policy in the affaire of Canaan was, to a certain extent, motivated by the prospect of profit. Rib-Hadda realized this, and in each case he tried to move the Pharaoh to décidé in his favour by emphasizing that his décisions might gain him easy profits.

Conclusions: The judgment of the Pharaoh in the affairs of his Canaanite vassals is well illus trated by the two episodes under discussion. The king had his own order of priorities and was not interested in the current affairs in his Asiatic province. Those he left to his com missioners in Canaan. He may have intervened in major events, or in affairs that could increase his property or prestige. Rib-Hadda understood this, and tried to incite the Pha raoh to act by emphasizing the loss of prestige caused by his silence, in view of what hap pened in Canaan. The two episodes discussed in this article show how Rib-Hadda tried to entice the Pharaoh to make décisions by emphasizing the prospect of an easy profit. In the first episode he has stressed the great wealth of Tyre, and in the second he pointed out the way to deliver the confiscated property to the king. No doubt this was the standard of the time,18 and Rib-Hadda was no différent from other mayors in the région. The décisions of the sun god were, to a certain extent, motivated by the prospect of profit, and those who knew how to manipulate him, and what to offer in a given moment, were able to direct his judgment in their favour."


Another aspect brings Raymond Westbrook : Patronage in the Ancient Near East. - In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 48.2. - 2005. - pp. 210 - 233. Obviously Aziru had the better connections to the Egyptian court and its officials. Several letters are, for example, addressed to Tutu. In them Aziru calls Tutu his "father" and "protector". Whether more than flattery (bribery?) was in play, must however remain open... Similarly, to officials in the court personally addressed letters from Rib-Hadda are not known.

Highly recommend I can also Amarna Diplomacy - The Beginnings of International Relations. - [Ed. Raymond Cohen / Raymond Westbrook]. - Baltimore / London : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000. - ISBN : 0801861993; 0801871034. - xvi, 307 p., ill., maps.

Greetings, Lutz.
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