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Fictional Books based in Egypt
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neseret
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Meritamon wrote:
I actually don't want e-books. Since I don't have any e-reader device, I was just wanting a little note for books only available in that format. So it's easier when looking for books. Perhaps also mentioning if something is likely out of print would be helpful.

(Sorry for any confusion.)


There's a wealth of "out of print" books on Egyptology online, by being either digitised as free publications by groups such as ABZU/ETANA (Electronic Tools and Ancient Near East Archives) or AWOL (Ancient World Online: mainly free journal access to articles), if you must insist on digital versions. The Gutenberg Project or Archive.org also have a huge repository of free TXT, PDF, and even Kindle versions of "out of print" Egyptology related works.

However, there's also a fair number of actual publishers who have made it their purpose to reissue "out of print" works in a physical book format. Offhand, I can think of Kessinger Publishing and Duckworth Egyptology Series (reissues and new Egyptology publications). It depends upon the title, but overall these kind of "republisher" style of physical book publishers are everywhere.

You can acquire these republications either new, at decent prices, or (as I have recently done) acquired used/very good condition copies (usually paperback) for as little as /$.01.

I believe in books over e-readers they are portable, require no electricity to run them, contain fully described information in most cases, and are easily used (via indexes) for research. If these are works that you can use over and over, as I do, you can make up a very impressive and complete working library (mine is close to 4500 volumes and resides in my home office). Whether you believe this is a waste of space is up to you, but books will always be more valuable than e-books, as I recently found out from my financial advisers, who gave my library a startlingly high value.

Once you have finished and/or no longer need a book, they can be recycled to make new books. Sure, you can delete e-books, but you use unrecyclable energy to acquire, use, maintain and/or delete these books, something you DON'T need with a physical book.
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Katherine Griffis-Greenberg

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Oriental Institute
Oriental Studies
Doctoral Programme [Egyptology]
Oxford University
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Lavender
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2014 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

neseret wrote:

The original poster has made my point by noting she only wants e-books because (quote)"...'only available in e-book', it's easier to look for things that way."

Why not read the whole book and get the entire context of what you're interested in?


Er...have you ever read an ebook before? As far as I can tell, you do get the entire context of what you're interested in when you read an ebook. I do the majority of my research for my novels via ebooks, because it's much easier to switch between texts on an ereader than to sift through a big stack of open books looking for the specific note or reference I need. In the case of some books, I have the ebook version and the print version (typically because I've found the print version at a used bookstore and found it so useful that I sought out the ebook version for better portability/easier use while writing.) I have never noticed that the ebooks lacked any information that the print books had. They all contain the same footnotes, etc.

Plus I love that I can easily create my own internal notes, link relevant passages together which I can then re-access with a touch, etc. It's a pretty great invention.

Yes, certainly the human raised survived, nay, flourished by reading things on paper (or parchment, or papyrus, or clay tablets) and writing down notes without typing or hyperlinking. We also survived without vaccines or fertilizer or airplanes or the internet for a long time, too. Just because a technology is new, that doesn't mean it's inferior to the old way of doing things.

But don't worry: print books will be around for a long time yet. In the meantime, it would be nice if those of us who do prefer the benefits of reading on a portable device wouldn't face name-calling for our preferences. It's just not something worth squabbling over in that way, is it?

Quote:

So, if I sound smug, I'm not: I'm frustrated by the modern "sound-byte" attitude to information transmission.


I wasn't saying you sounded smug. You accused somebody of being smug. You said on 20 Feb:

Quote:

Many of us still think that electronic books today are not the only means of reading, either.

So, please don't be so smug about it.


Your words, not mine. Smile I was just curious who exactly you were calling smug.
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neseret
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2014 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lavender wrote:
neseret wrote:

The original poster has made my point by noting she only wants e-books because (quote)"...'only available in e-book', it's easier to look for things that way."

Why not read the whole book and get the entire context of what you're interested in?


Er...have you ever read an ebook before? As far as I can tell, you do get the entire context of what you're interested in when you read an ebook. I do the majority of my research for my novels via ebooks, because it's much easier to switch between texts on an ereader than to sift through a big stack of open books looking for the specific note or reference I need. In the case of some books, I have the ebook version and the print version (typically because I've found the print version at a used bookstore and found it so useful that I sought out the ebook version for better portability/easier use while writing.) I have never noticed that the ebooks lacked any information that the print books had. They all contain the same footnotes, etc.


My only comment here is that the original poster preferred (or stated she did at the time) because it was "...it's easier to look for things that way." This implied she was looking for something by either word search or the like to get to specific things, in bits and pieces. You DO lose context if that is the only way you use an e-book.

I happen to use electronic formats in my work as well, but usually it's journal articles. However, I do possess an electronic version of dissertations and OOP books, such as Calverley's The Temple of King Sethos I at Abydos, because quite honestly, elephant folios are darned near impossible to carry around and/or refer to while I am writing. Wink

But if I want to be absolutely sure about what I am saying in reference to a point, I always refer to the print version, as even OCR scans have errors.

Done with this topic: it's been discussed enough.
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Katherine Griffis-Greenberg

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Oriental Institute
Oriental Studies
Doctoral Programme [Egyptology]
Oxford University
Oxford, United Kingdom

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Naunacht
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Joined: 06 Oct 2009
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2014 2:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lavender wrote:

Quote:
Did I already mention The Maya Papyrus? I don't think I have mentioned it before. This one is by Richard Coady. Long, but exceptionally well written account of the Amarna period/royal family. It probably has the most accurate history you'll find in fiction. I loved it!

I decided to read The Maya Papyrus on Lavender's recommendation since I'd really enjoyed her Sekhmet Bed very much (plus it was on sale at Amazon which pretty much made it a done deal.)

The book turned out to be a good old fashioned political intrigue with strong well imagined characters including an oh so ambitious Thuya, a god obsessed, brooding, paranoid Akhenaton and a delightfully creepy and murderous Aye.

I'm no expert on the Armana period but most if not all of the story fell within the realm of the possible.

At any rate it was great fun. Recommended for people who love serious historical novels.
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Meritamon
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a new novel that came out a few months ago. It's about Hatshepsut. (Available in both paper and kindle.)

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18667964-daughter-of-the-gods?ac=1
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winston
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No love for Waltari's The Egyptian? I think a lot of us geezers really enjoyed it as kids.
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