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Is the Egyptian word NTR, "god", related to nature
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This makes me wonder if the word nature is derived from the Egyptian neter. It would be interesting to know what the Greeks thought of as nature. What they were writing about in their descriptions of nature. If this is true then at the time of Greek study their language and ideology were just being formed. This would be an interesting avenue of pursuit, the development of Greek culture and its history.
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neseret
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2016 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dzama923 wrote:
This makes me wonder if the word nature is derived from the Egyptian neter. It would be interesting to know what the Greeks thought of as nature. What they were writing about in their descriptions of nature. If this is true then at the time of Greek study their language and ideology were just being formed. This would be an interesting avenue of pursuit, the development of Greek culture and its history.


As noted before, /nTr/ (pron: netjer), the Egyptian term for 'god', is NOT related to the term "nature", which is etymologically founded on 1200-50; Middle English natur (e) < Old French < Latin nātūra conditions of birth, quality, character, natural order, world. It is far more related to the term "birth" (Latin nātālis) than to the Egyptian terminology.

One should stop reading popular New Age tripe, as noted before, which give false etymologies of the terms for /nTr/, based upon words "sounding" similar, and attempt to make Egyptian religion simply into a worship of nature.

Egyptian religion is far deeper than this, with theological and philosophical underpinnings, with effects on worship, ritual, and the growth of personal piety. The works I have cited earlier in this thread are but a beginning to a fuller understanding of ancient Egyptian religion.
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2016 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Neseret. I find it appalling that they the independent writer's and scholars would say such a thing without evidence. I am going to investigate their reasoning to see if there is evidence. As of now, I have found that the answer may lay in the ancient Greek lost language called linear B. It was lost around 800 BC. An interesting note is that the alphabet's letter called Za is an ankh, though a bit more rigid, as in some depictions of the Gods holding the ankhs they have a longer curve to them. http://www.omniglot.com/images/writing/linearb.gif
There is also the ancient Greek letter A alphabet which is still undeciphered. Though it is thought to have evolved from the hieroglyphic text.
I am looking for a dictionary of Linear B which I have found, there are, though the author is revising his program and updating it.
There are other languages also, like the Phoenician and Meroitic alphabets, that I will investigate.
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2016 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Neseret. I find it appalling that they the independent writer's and scholars would say such a thing without evidence. I am going to investigate their reasoning to see if there is evidence. As of now, I have found that the answer may lay in the ancient Greek lost language called linear B. It was lost around 800 BC. An interesting note is that the alphabet's letter called Za is an ankh, though a bit more rigid, as in some depictions of the Gods holding the ankhs they have a longer curve to them. http://www.omniglot.com/images/writing/linearb.gif
There is also the ancient Greek letter A alphabet which is still undeciphered. Though it is thought to have evolved from the hieroglyphic text.
I am looking for a dictionary of Linear B which I have found, there are, though the author is revising his program and updating it.
There are other languages also, like the Phoenician and Meroitic alphabets, that I will investigate.
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2017 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have found a small dictionary of Linear B, the lost Greek language. Though I could not find any word that etymologically resembles neter. Granted the dictionary does not seem by any means a complete dictionary of the Greek Linear B. I will keep looking. Here is the link.

http://www.unm.edu/~blanter/Linear_B_Glossary.pdf
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 2:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've also heard neter pronounced neteru, maybe the etymology of this word could lead to different variations of the meaning of the word in different languages.
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"nTrw" (gods) is simply the plural of "nTr" (god).
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