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Where did they go?

 
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Daniella
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 5:23 am    Post subject: Where did they go? Reply with quote

Do any of the Egyptians today worship any of the old gods? And if not why?
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anneke
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 7:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think the egyptians worship the ancient gods anymore. (maybe some exception to that rule somewhere Wink )
The country is for a large part muslim, and there is still a fairly large group of Christians.

I don't know for how long the worship went on. It was still present during the Roman occupation in the first couple of centuries AD. I have no idea when it was replaced by other faiths though.

As to why not?: Same reason the Scandinavians don't worship their Viking gods anymore I guess. Passage of time changes the predominant religions in an area.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 7:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should mention that there is a modern day version of the egyptian religion. It is referred to as a "Kemetic religion".

I don't know much about it though...
Get the impression that it is practiced more here out west than in egypt, but I could be wrong...
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Philip Arrhidaeus
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A remnant of the Feast of Opet ?

http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/haggag.htm
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Where does it say on the article that it's the Opet remnant? It just says it's a muslim festival...

I've heard that the Muslims and Coptics may have incorporated concepts from ancient times in their festivals and traditions but I'm not sure if that's true...
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anneke
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Where does it say on the article that it's the Opet remnant? It just says it's a muslim festival...


The article doesn't say that, but if you compare it to the description of the Opet festival there definitely are some similarities.
Both are Theban, dedicated to a holy person (Amun vs Abu Haggag), there are processions, celebrations with music, and there is a religious as well as a secular component to the festival.

I have no idea if this festival was based on the Opet festival (somehow doubt it) but there are definitely some interesting similarities. Very Happy

There's a description of the Opet festival here:
http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/festival.htm
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Philip Arrhidaeus
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2005 3:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
. A large boat -- and sometimes three boats -- are carried by donkey-driven carts resembling the solar barque processions of Pharaonic times where one of the gods was taken from his/her own temple to that of another in a boat.


http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2003/661/tr1.htm

It could be a remnant, maybe not.
But people today carry one or tree boats through the streets of Luxor on the festival of Abu-el-Haggag.
If it has anything to do with the solar barque processions is not at all proven.
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2005 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wouldn't be surprised if it was a remnant of ancient times. Call me over-romantic but the idea that there is still a little bit of ancient Egyptian tradition in modern Egypt is a wonderful thought, and it would be so amazing if that were so. I think it's sad to think that the ancient Egyptian way of life died out completely with not a trace on the people than the monuments left behind...there must be something more that survived over thousands of years. But maybe I'm just being soppy here Laughing
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Philip Arrhidaeus
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.touregypt.net/magazine/mag02012001/mag4.htm

Denderah:
Quote:
To this day, temple visitations are made by women pursuing rejuvenated fertility. The recommended ritual is to leap over the carved figures, particularly that of Bes, protector of women and provider of children. Women are also recommended to pass their hands over the figures of Hathor and her consort Horus while praying for a successful pregnancy.


Tanis:
Quote:
Half a statue of Pharaoh Ramses II remains. Childless women from the area, journey to the statue bearing jugs of water, which they then pour over themselves. The jugs are then broken and the women depart, expecting to conceive shortly.


An Egyptian guide in Denderah told me that the many vertical scratches in the temple facade were made by local women who scraped little bits of stone from the building and mingled it with the flour when baking bread as a fertility purpose.
He told me that sometimes, in other temple walls, these scratches were as high as where the temple was buried before excavation.
Though I heard this on other occasions while in Egypt, I don’t know if this is true.
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Egyptian women still practise these things claimed above-even revering statues? I thought such things would have been banned by Muslim authorities?
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Greeks were influencing a lot of the study and practices of ancient Egypt in 300 B.C.. Then the Romans came in their time around the year 0. This is when Alexandria became a hub of information. Later these religions the Greek and Egyptian had the influence of the Roman Christianity circa 200 A.D.. There was established in Egypt monasteries of the Christian religion, like St. Catherine. St. Anthony was a saint who taught in Egypt. In 500 A.D. the muslim culture was started, and spread to Egypt shortly after.
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a rough description. The Greek influence was actually present from 800 to 300 B.C.. And then it transfered to the Roman.

resource: Oxford History of Ancient Egypt. Ian Shaw.
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 7:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dzama923 wrote:
This is a rough description. The Greek influence was actually present from 800 to 300 B.C.. And then it transfered to the Roman.

resource: Oxford History of Ancient Egypt. Ian Shaw.

Well, in the to me accessible edition ...

The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt. - [Ed. Ian Shaw]. - Oxford : University Press, 2003. - ISBN : 978-0-19-280458-7. - 550 p.

... the whole is then shown somewhat differently ... Especially in the Chapters 11 - 15, starting from page 308.
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