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Tutankhamun's Outermost Shrine

 
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 1:44 pm    Post subject: Tutankhamun's Outermost Shrine Reply with quote

Does anyone know of a translation for the outermost shrine of Tutankhamun? I am trying to find out the specific parts of the Book of the Heavenly Cow that are mentioned in his text. Thanks! Very Happy
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Aset
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello, DOS! pharaohwave

Arrow The Shrines of Tut-Ankh-Amon
Texts Translated with Introductions by
ALEXANDRE PIANKOFF
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, Aset! Very Happy
Great to see you're still around on the forum.
Thanks for the link to the book. Have you read it? Do you know if the outermost shrine includes the Legend of the Destruction of Mankind?
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

I have the book (right in front of me Cool ). Inside, on the left and on the back panel are the passages from the "Book of the Heavenly Cow" (Destruction of Mankind). The picture of the divine cow is on the back panel (p. 142, fig. 46).

The translation of the texts from the inside of the outermost shrine starts on page 135 ("Cowbook" at p. 141 - 145). Fig. 47, spread after p. 143, gives the hieroglyphs from the left panel.

Maybe also of interest ...

Anthony Spalinger : The Destruction of Mankind - A Transitional Literary Text. - In: Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur - SÄK 28. - 2000. - pp. 257 - 282 :
Quote:
A re-evaluation of the well known N.K. text dealing with the rebellion of mankind and also known as the Book of the Heavenly Cow. Connections to the royal “King's-Novel” are discussed, and a more accurate dating of the account is presented.


Erik Hornung : Der ägyptische Mythos von der Himmelskuh - Eine Ätiologie des Unvollkommenen. - [Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis 46]. - Freiburg / Göttingen : Universitätsverlag / Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, [1982] 1997. - ISBN : 3525536658; 3727802626. - XII, 129 p. - [PDF - 8,8 MB] :
Quote:
After general remarks on the text and its editions and translations in the introduction the text itself in its three versions from the tombs of Sethi I, Ramses II and Ramses III is presented in autographed hieroglyphs, as well as a part of the text from the tomb of Tutankhamun, followed by the legends to the scenes and remarks on the four versions. The translation is divided into 330 lines to which that of the version from the tomb of Tutankhamun is added. After the philological commentary, the author discusses the structure, meaning and date of the myth. The myth is divided in four parts: the destruction of mankind proper; the structure of heaven and of the Netherworld; the exertion of power through magic. The text is conceived as an aetiology which explains how the imperfectness of the world and the separation of gods and men have come into existence. In this respect it is a parallel to the Semitic story of the Deluge. The text probably dates from the period immediately after Akhnaton's death. This part of the study is concluded by remarks on the vignettes.

There follow four excursuses on: the kingship of the gods on earth; the revolt of mankind and the punishment; the religious motif of the Heavenly Cow, from the Predynastic to the late Ramesside Period; the conception of time and eternity (nHH and Dt). It follows a concordance with the publication by Maystre (BA 13432).

Indexes at the end.


Miriam Lichtheim : Ancient Egyptian Literature - A Book of Readings - Volume II : The New Kingdom. - Los Angeles : University of California Press, 1976. - XIV, 239 p. - [PDF - 6,2 MB] :
Quote:
After a general introduction to history and civilization during the New Kingdom (entitled "Continuity and Change") the author gives translations of a large number of literary texts, each single one or group of texts with a special introduction as well as bibliographical references. As in volume I she defines literature in a broad sense, including monumental inscriptions.

The translations are divided into seven parts. Part I is devoted to monumental inscriptions, both from private tombs (Ahmose son of Abana, Paheri, Rekhmire) and from royal monuments (i.a. the obelisk of Hatshepsut, parts from the Annals and the Poetical Stela of Tuthmosis III, the later boundary stelae of Akhnaton, the Kadesh Battle inscriptions, etc.). Part II deals with hymns and prayers, i.a. the short and the great Aton hymn, three penitential hymns from Deir el-Medîna, some prayers used in schooltexts, and the Harper's Song from the tomb of Neferhotep.

Part III contains translations of eight chapters of the Book of the Dead, including ch. 125, while Part IV consists of the Instructions of Any and Amenemope. Part V consists of the Pap. Lansing and part of Pap. Ch. Beatty IV (vs. 2.5-3.11) with the passage about the immortality of famous writers. In Part VI love poems are translated from the Pap. Ch. Beatty I, Pap. Harris 500 and the Cairo vase [IFAO] 1266 + 25218.

The last part (VII) deals with the six major tales, including The Destruction of Mankind and the Report of Wenamun, but excluding the Taking of Joppa since it is marred by major lacunae. Others still more fragmentary (e.g. Apophis and Sequenre) are equally omitted.

Extensive indexes on p. 233-239.

Greetings, Lutz.
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Aset
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 12:03 pm    Post subject: Tut's shrine Reply with quote

Quote:
The myth is divided in four parts: the destruction of mankind proper; the structure of heaven and of the Netherworld; the exertion of power through magic.

Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
Have you read it? Do you know if the outermost shrine includes the Legend of the Destruction of Mankind?
I too have the book in front of me. Smile
The inscription on Tut's outermost shrine belongs to the part "Structure of the Netherworld". So it is no part of the proper legend.

pharaohpm

Aset
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, Lutz and Aset, for all the information! Very Happy
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Online, since yesterday ...

Friedrich Abitz : Pharao als Gott in den Unterweltsbüchern des Neuen Reiches. - [Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis 146]. - Freiburg / Göttingen : Universitätsverlag / Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1995. - ISBN : 3727810408. - VII, 219 p. - [PDF - 4,5 MB] :
Quote:
A study of the Books of the Netherworld in the N.K. royal tombs, which were destined to ensure the life of the deceased king in the hereafter and his divinity for all eternity and, as such, played an important part, in addition to the funerary equipment, very little of which has come down to us. After the brief introductory ch. 1, the books studied are the Amduat (ch. 2), the Litany to the Sun (ch. 3), the Book of Gates (ch. 4), the Book of the Heavenly Cow (Destruction of Mankind) in ch. 5, the Book of Caverns (ch. 6), the Book of the Earth (ch. 7), and the B.D. spells 123-129 and some other spells that are attested in the royal tombs (ch. 8 ). Not included are the Books of Heaven and the Ritual of the Opening of the Mouth, besides certain recurrent or unique representations and texts, such as the scene of the resurrection of Osiris, the litany of the Horus eye and certain scenes from late Ramesside royal tombs. After describing these funerary texts as present in the individual tombs and giving in each ch. a summary of the significance of the pertinent text for the dead king, the author presents in ch. 9 his general conclusions. First he sketches the chronological development of the use of the books on the tomb walls, and points out the structural differences between the books. Further sections are devoted to the distribution, changes and additions in scenes and texts in individual tombs, and to the usurpation of the royal books by private persons. It is concluded that the Books of the Netherworld were designed to function exclusively for the dead king. From the use of the books a certain change in the ideas about the scenes and texts necessary for the king's afterlife can be gleaned. Two important changes are the replacement of the Amduat by the Book of Gates (the Amduat is absent in the tombs of Horemheb and Ramses I) and the complete use of the Book of Caverns and the Book of the Earth. Two factors for the life of the king in the hereafter stand out. First, the cycle of death and life, the entry into the Dat and the regeneration in the eastern horizon. But it is equally clear that the books were distributed in the tomb chambers, modified and expanded according to subtle rules governed by a single aim: to bring about, with the fullness of their pictures and images, protection and provision for the king, his deification, his regeneration and his ultimate ascension to heaven and to the everlasting stars in eternity.

The book is in German, but "copy and past" works in this PDF. So, one can use online translator for the text. The "Book of the Heavenly Cow" will be discussed from page 92 onwards :

I. Vernichtung des Menschengeschlechtes (Destruction of mankind) : Verse 1 - 100
II. Einrichtung des Himmels (Setup of the sky) : Verse 101 - 201
III. Einrichtung der Unterwelt (Establishment of the underworld) : Verse 202 - 271
IV. Macht durch Zauber (Power by magic) : Verse 272 - 330.

Verse 202-224 and Verse 306-330 are, with some omissions (Verse 221 & 222, Recital in Part III), to find on Tutankhamun's shrine.

Following Abitz there is only one complete version in the Valley of the Kings, in KV 17 - Sethos I. There could be another in KV 7 - Ramses II, but at the time his book was published this tomb was not completely freed from rubble ...

Greetings, Lutz.
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neseret
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PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2018 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lutz wrote:
Online, since yesterday ...

Friedrich Abitz : Pharao als Gott in den Unterweltsbüchern des Neuen Reiches. - [Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis 146]. - Freiburg / Göttingen : Universitätsverlag / Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1995. - ISBN : 3727810408. - VII, 219 p. - [PDF - 4,5 MB] :
Quote:
A study of the Books of the Netherworld in the N.K. royal tombs, which were destined to ensure the life of the deceased king in the hereafter and his divinity for all eternity and, as such, played an important part, in addition to the funerary equipment, very little of which has come down to us. After the brief introductory ch. 1, the books studied are the Amduat (ch. 2), the Litany to the Sun (ch. 3), the Book of Gates (ch. 4), the Book of the Heavenly Cow (Destruction of Mankind) in ch. 5, the Book of Caverns (ch. 6), the Book of the Earth (ch. 7), and the B.D. spells 123-129 and some other spells that are attested in the royal tombs (ch. 8 ). Not included are the Books of Heaven and the Ritual of the Opening of the Mouth, besides certain recurrent or unique representations and texts, such as the scene of the resurrection of Osiris, the litany of the Horus eye and certain scenes from late Ramesside royal tombs. After describing these funerary texts as present in the individual tombs and giving in each ch. a summary of the significance of the pertinent text for the dead king, the author presents in ch. 9 his general conclusions. First he sketches the chronological development of the use of the books on the tomb walls, and points out the structural differences between the books. Further sections are devoted to the distribution, changes and additions in scenes and texts in individual tombs, and to the usurpation of the royal books by private persons. It is concluded that the Books of the Netherworld were designed to function exclusively for the dead king. From the use of the books a certain change in the ideas about the scenes and texts necessary for the king's afterlife can be gleaned. Two important changes are the replacement of the Amduat by the Book of Gates (the Amduat is absent in the tombs of Horemheb and Ramses I) and the complete use of the Book of Caverns and the Book of the Earth. Two factors for the life of the king in the hereafter stand out. First, the cycle of death and life, the entry into the Dat and the regeneration in the eastern horizon. But it is equally clear that the books were distributed in the tomb chambers, modified and expanded according to subtle rules governed by a single aim: to bring about, with the fullness of their pictures and images, protection and provision for the king, his deification, his regeneration and his ultimate ascension to heaven and to the everlasting stars in eternity.

The book is in German, but "copy and past" works in this PDF. So, one can use online translator for the text. The "Book of the Heavenly Cow" will be discussed from page 92 onwards :

I. Vernichtung des Menschengeschlechtes (Destruction of mankind) : Verse 1 - 100
II. Einrichtung des Himmels (Setup of the sky) : Verse 101 - 201
III. Einrichtung der Unterwelt (Establishment of the underworld) : Verse 202 - 271
IV. Macht durch Zauber (Power by magic) : Verse 272 - 330.

Verse 202-224 and Verse 306-330 are, with some omissions (Verse 221 & 222, Recital in Part III), to find on Tutankhamun's shrine.

Following Abitz there is only one complete version in the Valley of the Kings, in KV 17 - Sethos I. There could be another in KV 7 - Ramses II, but at the time his book was published this tomb was not completely freed from rubble ...


A little late to this (work does that Razz ), but I also suggest a look at this work by John Darnell:

Darnell, J. C. 1995. The Enigmatic Netherworld Books of the Solar-Osirian Unity: Cryptographic Compositions in the Tombs of Tutankhamun, Ramesses VI, and Ramesses IX. (4 Vols.). Ph. D. Dissertation (Unpublished), Near Eastern Studies and Civilizations, University of Chicago: Chicago.

This has also been published in the Orbus Biblicus Orientalis series, but is very expensive.

You can download the Ph.D. version, above, for 20% of the price at Proquest.

Hope this assists...

Regards,
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Katherine Griffis-Greenberg

Doctoral Candidate
Oriental Institute
Oriental Studies
Doctoral Programme [Egyptology]
Oxford University
Oxford, United Kingdom

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