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Picture of a bust of Akhenaten
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Lutz
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Location: Berlin, Germany

PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2015 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lutz wrote:
Hannover, K.M. 1970.49 was, as usual with statues of this kind, originally painted. The colors have been identified with certainty, the skin of the face was kept in red-brown. Thus the gender of the person depicted is well established, it is a man. ...

After a discussion with Ray Johnson about his article "An Amarna Royal Head at Hanover Museum August Kestner" (In: KMT 26-3. - 2015. - pp. 22-29) via e-mail and over the list on EEF, I have to correct this statement.

Johnson pointed out that the "normal rules of red/men [and] yellow/women do not apply" do not apply during the Amarna-Period. There are several examples (on monuments at Karnak, the famous princess scene in the Ashmolean Museum from the King's Palace next to the small Aten temple, a fragmentary painted figure of Nefertiti in the Manchester Museum from the famous bridge between the Great Palace and the King's Palace) with red pigment for the skin of females.

In his article from the new issue of KMT he identifies Hannover, Kestner Museum, 1970.49 as Nefertiti after she became co-regent / king Ankhkheperure Neferneferuaten. Ray Johnson's argument of the traces of the rounded (rather than squared off) ear tabs :
Quote:
"... the traces of the original ear-tabs on Kestner 1970.49 are round. Rounded eartabs that frame the brow band are usually found only on two types of crowns, the Khepresh, and the close-fitting Cap Crown associated with it. ... It is unlikely that the present Khepresh replaced an earlier one. A close-fitting Cap Crown can be eliminated, because enough survives of the front of the original crown to show that it did not follow the shape of the skull, like the Cap Crown does, but continued upward.
There is, however, a third type of crown, found only in the Amarna period, where round ear-tabs are also present. Reliefs and sculptures of the upward-flaring, flat-topped crown of Nefertiti — including the most famous example of all, Berlin 21.3007 — have rounded ear-tabs identical to the traces on Kestner 1970.49. ..." ( Ray Johnson, KMT 26-3, 2015, pp. 27 - 28 )

is in my view a not to be doubting case for the identification of the crown of Nefertiti as the original headgear of Kestner 1970.49.

Greetings, Lutz.
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karnsculpture
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Kestner bust has all the hallmarks of a particular artist or studio that was active into the reign of Horemheb. The signature style is the way the lips are treated, not symmetrical, and the faces all have some similarity -

Maya and Merit

Tut's solid gold coffin

Coffin fitting in wood in the British Museum (identity of portrait unknown)

Fragment of a woman's face in jasper in the Met

Coffin that housed the mummy of Ramesses II but identified tentatively as originally made for Horemheb.

All of the above and more have the same signature style and look somewhat alike even though they clearly portray different individuals. So I think the Kestner bust could be any of the people discussed but to me it still most closely resembles Akhenaten.
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maat
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2021 7:38 pm    Post subject: Re: Picture of a bust of Akhenaten Reply with quote

anneke wrote:


I like this picture of Akhenaten. The khepresh crown is nicely made. No details or embellishments on the crown or the collar.
I wonder if it was meant to be painted.

The discussion in this topic are fascinating.

About the image: SHE is pretty.
Consider it carefully.
It is not Akhenaten and it is not Tutankhamun.
She is the wife of Akhenaten, daughter and sister of Nefertiti, and mother of Tutankhamun.
She held the throne for her son, the heir, Tutankhamun and died while doing so.
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maat
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2021 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lutz wrote:
Bust of Akhenaten (Berlin ÄMP 21360) see Ludwig Borchardt : Porträts der Königin Nofret-ete aus den Grabungen 1912 / 13 in Tell El-Amarna. - [Ausgrabungen der Deutschen Orientgesellschaft in Tell El-Amarna III]. - Leipzig : Hinrichs, 1923. - Page 30 ff. - Figures 27 - 29 :



Greetings, Lutz.

Lutz is great.

In the excavation diagram that Lutz posted, observe in the upper right frame the relative positions of the bust of Nefertiti and the (bust and rubble) that is buried deeper in the lower layers.

The Bust of Nefertiti is located and positioned as if it is looking over a body or corpse that is below.

Consider. Could this not be a good way to leave a message that could be recognized and understood for thousands of years to symbolically inform that a daughter lying prone below died before the mother who is above looking over the place where the daughter lies (symbolically)?

Consider also with this the "home stela" in Berlin.
It shows the king and queen seated opposite each other with the king affectionately holding one child and kissing one child and three children seated on Nefertiti.

Consider that the king and queen are daughter and mother. The daughter is Meritaten (mother of Tutankhamun for whom she holds the throne).

In the stela, her crown is damaged to indicate that she died on the throne.

Consider that the "home stela" shows Nefertiti with her for daughters with her eldest daughter as king holding her child (Akhenaten's heir).
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maat
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2021 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I meant to write:
Consider that the "home stela" shows Nefertiti with her [four] daughters...
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maat
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2021 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lutz wrote:
Here is an interesting picture from Ludwig Borchardt : Ausgrabungen in Tell el-Amarna 1912/13 - Vorläufiger Bericht. - MDOG zu Berlin 52, 1913, p. 40-41 :



Model bust of Amenhotep IV (Paris, Louvre E 11076 and Berlin, ÄMP 21360).

Greetings, Lutz.

Does the first bust on the viewer's left hand side have present or intact uraeus and vulture emblems on front of the crown?

Does anyone know or have a frontal image?
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SaintGermain
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2021 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

maat wrote:
Lutz wrote:
Here is an interesting picture from Ludwig Borchardt : Ausgrabungen in Tell el-Amarna 1912/13 - Vorläufiger Bericht. - MDOG zu Berlin 52, 1913, p. 40-41 :



Model bust of Amenhotep IV (Paris, Louvre E 11076 and Berlin, ÄMP 21360).

Greetings, Lutz.

Does the first bust on the viewer's left hand side have present or intact uraeus and vulture emblems on front of the crown?

Does anyone know or have a frontal image?


No, but the profile view is the most helpful, anyway. At all stages of his reign, Akhenaten is the only one who is shown in the round [or anywhere] with that configuration of elongated chin. It is his most unique and ubiquitous feature. Don't forget that this young man was already a king before the move to Akhetaten and the innovative style began. But the same chin is evident in any busts or statues brought from elsewhere--and they certainly represent a very young pharaoh. So there were 17 years for portraits of Akhenaten to be made.

Neferneferuaten as ruler is not attested past a Year 3. Most likely. if she wore any crown it would be that rounded blue one that seems to have become the substitute of the flat-topped one. That rounded cap-crown seems to me some sort of compromise between the older queenly headdress and something closer to what a king might wear. Nefertiti may have been a temporary co=king with her husband at Akhetaten, but after his death who knows how long she remained at that place. Thutmose II probably reigned no longer than Neferneferuaten and there is hardly anything portraying him. Even Thutmose I who ruled longer than them both--what is there of his?
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