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What's your specialty?
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Daniella
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 4:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Wow, you really did go the whole nine yards. You actually exracted the teeny-weeny organs? Did you use an obsidian knife? My big question is, did you extract the brain through the nose? And, how does one find a mouse's nostril?


Yeah it was messy, but fun. I don't think I was aware of which organs I was removing exactly, they were just so tiny! I used a razor blade which I removed from my pencil sharpener, I still use those things today (not for cutting corpses) they are very sharp.

Quote:
You make a good point, Daniella, but remember that in tombs archaeologists have found plentiful clothing, including women's gowns and dresses. From there it's not too hard to determine how such garments were fitted on the female body.


Yeah, but you can't completely extract the idea that maybe the royal women sometimes went around their palace topless.

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You're going to love gay Robins's book, by the way!


That makes me think you're recommending a book about homosexual birds to me. Laughing Sorry.
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
It wasn't hot year around, so they must have had something for the chillier days


huh? I'm pretty sure that Egypt is well known for being hot all year round! Someone who went there told me that it was about 28C in December. But then again, that is a lot cooler than the 50C heat in August, yeesh!

Ponchos!!! That's become so common in the UK, it's almost 'chav'. Laughing (Chav is a British slang term meaning low class, trashy, someone who wears Burberry prints and naff flashy jewellery with big hoop earrings, faux designer wear and pink tracksuits thinking they are 'trendy' when in fact they are far from it!!!) I'd hate to think the Egyptians were chav-ish lol...but if they one day find Burberry check in an ancient tomb... Laughing sorry if you don't get my English sense of humour...

As for topless, maybe the women in palaces did, in privacy...but surely not on the streets, in the fields, at work and so on? I know the men only wore loincloths there...i said this on another thread, but I know that in African tribes and other cultures living in hot climates, the women are topless. This is purely for practical reasons, because it is too hot to wear much else. Could this have been the case in Egypt-that women may have been bare breasted because of the climate, especially during hard work and dancing and so on? Mind you, sunburnt nipples...ouch!!!!! Laughing

I have some sandals which have leather thongs that go between the toes and tie round the ankle with gold beads-I suppose they could look Egyptian...and I did see someone with 'ankh' sandals on the train recently. Not that I agree that's where the ankh symbol came from (that's another story!) but the way the straps were arranged looked like an ankh. But I'm not sure if there is a direct influence on modern shoes that goes straight back to Egypt.

Ok, back to specialities, another thing I find interesting is how ancient Egypt has shaped modern society. I know it sounds a bit strange but you know how the Greeks, Romans, Babylonians etc have influenced so much of modern civilisation-even the Aztecs introduced us to the wonders of chocolate! Very Happy So I was wondering, have the Egyptians influenced us?
Well, with art and architecture, yes, but I'm thinking more of the subtle things. However I've become frighteningly sceptical of some claims that 'ancient Egyptians invented this' and so on. One example is the thing about ties...
but I've also discovered fascinating, and also controversial, connections with religion, and how the ancient Egyptian religion has influenced modern religion-not just the new pagan Egyptian revival religions, but also, yes, Christianity etc...me and Kmt-sesh have had discussions on this throughout the forum.
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Daniella
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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huh? I'm pretty sure that Egypt is well known for being hot all year round!


Nights were cool too. And maybe they wore shawls to keep the heat out?

Quote:
Ponchos!!! That's become so common in the UK, it's almost 'chav'

I like ponchos, I wear them often. Magazines said that they weren't in style anymore, but screw'em. The only girls who wear designer are either really wealthy or their parents have good connections. I practically vomit when I hear 'louis vuitton',' juicy couture' ,'chanel', 'burberry' why am I typing it? puke_r

VALUE-VILLAGE all the way! (It's a really popular thrift-store in Canada)

Quote:
As for topless, maybe the women in palaces did, in privacy...but surely not on the streets, in the fields, at work and so on?

That's pretty much what I meant. Sorry if I didn't make it clear. I'm pretty sure the servants and dancers were definately topless.

Quote:
Mind you, sunburnt nipples...ouch!!!!!

Laughing Yeah, that hurts!

Your sandals, I would say were Egyptian styled.
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Diorite
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't really have a specialty. I know more about the Amarna period than any other. It's weird, but I don't even really remember what got me interested in ancient Egypt (unlike geology, where I could tell you exactly what hooked me). It might have been movies like, dare I say it?, "The Mummy". We watched lots of horror/scifi flicks when I was a kid. I think part of it is the impressive monuments as well.

No particular books, either.

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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daniella wrote:
Quote:
That makes me think you're recommending a book about homosexual birds to me. Sorry.


I had to think about that for a moment, probably because I was at the museum for Members' Night till 10:00 last night and my brain is firing on only half its cylinders today. But then it hit me! Laughing Laughing I burst out laughing. The odd thing is, as much as I've used material from that book written by gay Robins in various posts, I never made the connection myself.

Well, that's probably because I'm as pure as an altar boy, and you're corrupting me! Surprised

Reminds me of those movies Meet the Parents and Meet the Fockers, in which Ben Stiller plays that character Gaylord Focker--gay for short. Put that together with the last name...I dare not write it here. He has two cousins in the second film whose first names are, if I remember, Harry and Randy. I know, cheap junior-high humor, but damn if I didn't laugh!

Quote:
Nights were cool too. And maybe they wore shawls to keep the heat out?


I imagine in the north it can get quite cool, near the sea. But the farther south you go, the warmer it gets, and I've been told that even in winter the region of Abu Simbel can see temperatures in the 90s! That's too damn hot for me. But then again, I've spent most of my life in the northern United States and can't comprehend a December with temperatures over 30 degrees.

Awhile back I talked at length with a couple of women at our museum who had traveled through Egypt and other parts of the Middle East. Their trip had taken place in the summer, in the hottest months. They told me that from their own experience, the long, flowing, loose garments that both men and women wear over there actually do help one to stay cool--something to do with the body's reduction in temperature when one sweats. I don't exactly remember how they phrased it, unfortunately.

Diorite wrote:
Quote:
I don't really have a specialty.


You're definitely the forum's expert on rocks and minerals. I should think it would be a simple matter for you to become expert on how the ancient Egyptians used their minerals. I get questions about this subject very often at the museum, and I wish I had a better handle on it. People are more interested than you might think about how the Egyptians produced blue glaze from quartz frit, how they worked with stones like granite, diorite, calcite, and carnelian...it's fascinating stuff. It's a goal of mine to learn more about it, and you've already helped numerous times. Very Happy
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Daniella
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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I was at the museum for Members' Night till 10:00 last night

I wondered where you were! Well I hope you had fun! Very Happy

Quote:
Well, that's probably because I'm as pure as an altar boy, and you're corrupting me!

Whatever! You're just as bad, and you know it! Wink

Quote:
Reminds me of those movies Meet the Parents and Meet the Fockers


Those movies were so funny! My favourite was when Dustin Hoffman said "I'll Focker-ize you!" to Barbara Streisand. Laughing

Quote:
the long, flowing, loose garments that both men and women wear over there actually do help one to stay cool

Yeah, it makes perfect sense because it's used in the animal kingdom aswell, with fur and feathers I mean. Yeah I can just imagine a herd of elephants lumbering along in long linen dresses, that actually reminds me of watching 'Sharon, Lois and Bram' as a child, you know the elephant show?....sckinna-marinky y ? Sorry I'm blabbering, see what you're diong to me John?
Anyways covering up your skin is a good way of blocking the sun therefore preventing the creation of heat to form on your body.
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 11:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like the way we can all bring out expertise together on this board...but even so, I feel incredibly dumb in the presence of kmt-sesh and Anneke who sometimes have these Egyptological discussions in threads that seem fascinating, but are way beyond my scope, I'm afraid. I just feel a bit stupid when coming across such threads and I'm humbled by your knowledge! Smile

Well, it would make sense to wear long clothes to keep the sun off your skin and a head-cloth to prevent heatstroke, usually they are white garments, so they reflect heat. I'm not sure about how they work to keep you cool otherwise-something about the wind circulating through them? Mmm, 90 degrees. Toasty. Smile I've had a December with temperatures that high. But then again, this was in Mauritius. Very Happy

Anyway, the knowledg I have of my specialty-mythology, gods and religion, has certainly been expanded here. I've learnt about what a fascinating religion it was, and it's not the 'death-obsessed and curse-obsessed' religion most people think it is, it's more complex and interesting than that. I'm not sure if that's correct, but I think the Egyptian gods were quite 'human' in the way that they felt human emotions, and could even die and so on, but at the same time the religion was very nature-centred too, as is evident with the gods' animal heads, and their connections to natural cycles and so on. As well, not only did the Egyptian religion focus on the afterlife, but also on life as well as death, the mysteries of nature the cosmos as well as the more human complexities. All in all, a fascinating study.
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Sesen
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 11:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry I'm so late at poking my 2 cents worth in here Wink

My main interest (although any period of dynastic Egypt fascinates me) centres on a pretty narrow point of time - the 18th and 19th Dynastys. More specifically the family connections between the nobles and the royal family, especially the family of Yuya and Tuya. For me, in a way, the nobles were the real people who lived, loved and died all those thousands of years ago. The rise and fall in their families fortunes are a tiny glimpse of what power struggles went on behind the scene.
Searching for more and more information about them is an obsession that never leaves my mind at virtually any point of time throughout every day ( Laughing I'm sure a psychiatrist would have some name for me but I prefer Egyptophile). Work keeps me away from this forum alot but that does'nt mean I lose interest, not by a long shot - no day is complete at whatever hour of the night it is without reading something, anything about Egypt.

I can hardly remember a time when Egypt hasn't been a fascination for me, but I do clearly remember my first memory of Egypt. My mum had a bible when I was about 6 or 7 yrs that had a picture of the Giza pyramids inside - it was total everlasting love at first sight. I didn't want to know about Hebrews, tell me about the people who built THEM! But it was'nt until 2yrs or so ago that I changed jobs and got a bit of free time, bought my computer, got connected to the net, that I could start really studying the way I had always wanted to.

Very Happy Needless to say my favourite book is 'The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt' By Aidan Dodson and Dylan Hilton.
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I still can't tell my 18th dynasty from my 19th lol...I can't name a single pharaoh in those times! I'm such an amateur Laughing

Anyway, how did I discover Egypt. Very recently, in the last 5 years. It all started with me researching Isis, which then led onto ancient Egypt. Now I've been bitten by the Egypt bug (which if you must know, is a scarab Wink ) and I go all funny whenever I see the slightest hint of Egypt anywhere. I see an Eye of Horus tattoo on someone famous in the papers, I get excited. I see an advert poster in the Underground with Taweret on it (yes, there was one-Taweret on an elephant's back with a monkey and a cabaret dancer-don't ask) and I felt a warm glow inside thinking 'I'm probably one of the few people who can name that strange hippo thingy in that advert!' Egypt is like a drug, and I'm hooked! Very Happy
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Daniella
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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My mum had a bible when I was about 6 or 7 yrs that had a picture of the Giza pyramids inside - it was total everlasting love at first sight. I didn't want to know about Hebrews, tell me about the people who built THEM!


AWWW! That brought tears to my eyes. Smile

Quote:
and I go all funny whenever I see the slightest hint of Egypt anywhere.

I know what you mean, it's like a rush. Today I was in a mall and I saw a painting of King Tutankhamen and I stopped in my tracks and glided over to it as if in a trance!
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Sesen
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 11:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isi wrote:
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Egypt is like a drug, and I'm hooked!


Laughing One I don't want help to get over.
Mad It's not a cheap habit though is it?!

Daniella wrote:
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AWWW! That brought tears to my eyes.


Wink Probably bought tears to Mum's eyes too - "heathen daughter..."
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2005 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm continuously surprised by how this thread has taken off. I wasn't sure it would get more than a couple of hits, but I'm glad all of you are sharing. I love reading this stuff.

isisinacrisis wrote:
Quote:
but even so, I feel incredibly dumb in the presence of kmt-sesh and Anneke who sometimes have these Egyptological discussions in threads that seem fascinating, but are way beyond my scope, I'm afraid. I just feel a bit stupid when coming across such threads and I'm humbled by your knowledge!


That's so very kind of you to say, isisinacrisis. You are a true sweetheart. But please don't sell yourself short...Egyptian Dreams would not be the same without you, and your posts bring up lots of lively discussions and interesting debates. I don't know what we'd do without you here. You bring a great deal of enthusiasm and energy to Egyptian Dreams.

To be completely honest, though, I often feel incredibly dumb in the presence of anneke. Sesen, too, for that matter. When those two get together and start discussing royal lineages and courtiers and obscure facts about certain personages, I feel like a drooling simpleton!

Quote:
I'm not sure if that's correct, but I think the Egyptian gods were quite 'human' in the way that they felt human emotions


That's an excellent way to put it. You're absolutely right. I know little about Greek deities, but when I talk about Egyptian gods and goddesses with folks who know their Greek mythology, they often remark how similar the two pantheons are, the way the deities are quite fallible and so like the humas over whom they were supposed to be so superior.

Quote:
I still can't tell my 18th dynasty from my 19th


Come now, isisinacrisis. It's really quite simple. One has the number 18 in it and the other has the number 19.

My appologies, that's my smart-a** self sneaking through. I couldn't resist. You may beat me with a flail now. Surprised

Sesen wrote:
Quote:
Sorry I'm so late at poking my 2 cents worth in here


Sorry, gal, the price is now 50 cents. Payable by credit card or money order. Checks not accepted. Very Happy

Quote:
no day is complete at whatever hour of the night it is without reading something, anything about Egypt.


You and I are of like minds. I literally cannot seem to go to sleep at night unless I've first read a bit about ancient Egypt.

I'm also a big fan of the 18th and 19th dynasties, particularly the former. I mean, an unbelievable amount of intrigue and adventure took place just in those 260 years of the 18th Dynasty. My favorite king of all happens to be Ramesses II in the 19th Dynasty, but would Egypt ever have been so fascinating without people like Ahmose, Hatshepsut, Tuthmosis III, Amunhotep III, Akhenaten, Tut (of course), and Horemheb? No way!

Quote:
I didn't want to know about Hebrews, tell me about the people who built THEM!


But according to misconceptions from the Bible, it was the Hebrews who built the pyramids! No, I know, the Bible doesn't even say that, but a surprising number of people today think that's the case...and some seemed utterly shocked when you dispell it for them. Shocked

Quote:
Needless to say my favourite book is 'The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt' By Aidan Dodson and Dylan Hilton.


That is an incredible book, isn't it? It should be on the bookshelf of anyone with any serious interest in the Two Lands.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2005 1:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sesen wrote:
.... For me, in a way, the nobles were the real people who lived, loved and died all those thousands of years ago. The rise and fall in their families fortunes are a tiny glimpse of what power struggles went on behind the scene.

I couldn't agree more Very Happy

The kings and queens all have themselves described in these grandiose terms that you seem to get only a 2-dimensional impression of the royalty.

Not that the individuals describe themselves in such open and honest ways Smile But they have a bit less controll over what gets written and I find it fun to try to read between the lines and see if there are hints about what went on behind the scenes.

kmt-sesh wrote:
To be completely honest, though, I often feel incredibly dumb in the presence of anneke. Sesen, too, for that matter.

Oh boy Embarassed I'm not any smarter than any of you.
And here I am thinking I'm rather weak in the areas of mythology and linguistics Laughing Nice ego boost to me, but you don't give yourselves anywhere near enough credit if that's your take on things Wink

It really is quite interesting to hear where everyone picked up their "addiction". Sesen is right though it can get a bit pricey.

Quote:
I'm also a big fan of the 18th and 19th dynasties, particularly the former. I mean, an unbelievable amount of intrigue and adventure took place just in those 260 years of the 18th Dynasty. My favorite king of all happens to be Ramesses II in the 19th Dynasty, but would Egypt ever have been so fascinating without people like Ahmose, Hatshepsut, Tuthmosis III, Amunhotep III, Akhenaten, Tut (of course), and Horemheb? No way!

There really is a rather large number of larger than life people here aren't there?

With all the books you've mentioned, I have to say I really like Breasted's Ancient Records more and more. They are great summaries of the great events, and there are plenty of translations of monuments etc included. I love hearing about the ancient egyptians FROM the ancient egyptians.

And it covers so many aspects. There's history, religion, everything:)
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Daniella
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2005 1:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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I'm not any smarter than any of you.

Except for me, right? Rolling Eyes

I think you'll all agree that I'm the dumbest one here.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2005 2:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very Happy Fishing for compliments Daniella?


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I think you'll all agree that I'm the dumbest one here.

I will definitely NOT agree to any such thing Wink

I think it's difficult to measure intelligence to begin with (no matter what IQ tests try to tell you). To me a person with a genuine interest in the world around them cannot possibly be dumb. Anyone who asks questions and exchanges ideas with others is in my experience "inoculated" against what I would consider dumb.
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