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Aten worship (history of?)

 
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VBadJuJu
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2005 1:49 am    Post subject: Aten worship (history of?) Reply with quote

moderator's note: this topic was split from another discussion Smile


kmt_sesh wrote:
But some of these tablets seem to me to bear witness to the strong possibility that there was a co-regency (and perhaps a long one), and I don't know why the issue still has such ardent detractors.


It would seem that in part, it is hard to reconcile Akhenaten turning things upside down with a more traditional king is more or less just standing by. At the worse it sort of implicates A3 in the whole Aten fiasco.
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Osiris II
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2005 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At the worse it sort of implicates A3 in the whole Aten fiasco.


Actually, the Aten was not a new god, but had been around for quite some time. He was only brought more into prominence during the reign of Akhenaten. But the start of that up-swing was created by Amenhotep III. Unlike his son, he did things very quietly. For example, his pleasure-craft, which he used, had a name based on Aten--I think it was Horizen of Aten. He did not try to force the god on his people as his son did, which seems to have been more successful.
The "start of One God" idea was that of his son, who seems to have "gone off the deep end" after his father's death, establishing his city, moving the court there and pursuing the old gods, particularly Amun, relentlessly. That he was not successful shows up in the many gods worshipped by the people in Aketaten. Small household shrines of several gods have been found. More and more today, the attack on Amun seems to have been political rather than religious. The Amun priesthood had become too powerful, and the Pharaoh felt threatened by this.
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Claire
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2005 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes i'm not suprised the pharoah felt threatened, at one point the amun priesthood held so much influence they could control everything!
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VBadJuJu
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2005 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Osiris II wrote:
Actually, the Aten was not a new god, but had been around for quite some time. He was only brought more into prominence during the reign of Akhenaten. But the start of that up-swing was created by Amenhotep III.


I think you can see small signs of a growing emphasis on the Aten even before that. The name starts popping up here and there on stela and the like.

Osiris II wrote:
Unlike his son, he did things very quietly. For example, his pleasure-craft, which he used, had a name based on Aten--I think it was Horizen of Aten.


"The Aten Gleams". Some would ascribe that to Akhenaten - I personally dont see Akhenaten influencing the naming of the boat which is a gift from his dad to his mom whether he is crown prince or co-regent at the time....unless A3 was incapacitated or something,

Osiris II wrote:

the attack on Amun seems to have been political rather than religious. The Amun priesthood had become too powerful, and the Pharaoh felt threatened by this.


I think that is true in the case of A3, not so much for Akhenaten. In his case it seems somewhat religious and perhaps driven by some psychological issues (obsessive compulsive, egomaniacal...who knows).
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VBadJuJu
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2005 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
It certainly was, but by all apprearances Smenkhkare's was a dump-and-run.


I flashed on an image later of a drive-by burial:

Late a night, a regal chariot comes charging the the Valley of the Kings, horses all lathered up from a long ride from Armana. The driver pushes poor Smenky in his girly rishii coffin off the back - KER-PLUNK!! And dashes off.

Sleepy eyed Tomb Organizers come stubling out..."what the ----??" "This must be the king..."

LOL
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2005 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

VBadJuJu wrote:
Quote:
I think you can see small signs of a growing emphasis on the Aten even before that. The name starts popping up here and there on stela and the like.


Indeed. As much as I myself have written that Akhenaten received his love for the Aten from his father, Amunhotep III, it appears that Amunhotep III's father, Tuthmosis IV, was rather fond of the Aten himself. It may well go farther back than that. In his Tombos temple in Nubia, Tuthmosis I is shown wearing the sun disk, and the disk is accompanied by the hieroglyphic designation "god." That's almost 170 years before AKhenaten came to power, but I suppose it depends on how one interprets the inscriptional evidence.

Quote:
It would seem that in part, it is hard to reconcile Akhenaten turning things upside down with a more traditional king is more or less just standing by. At the worse it sort of implicates A3 in the whole Aten fiasco.


Though an Atenist himself, Amunhotep III kept it in more personal bounds, and he was definitely more traditional than his son. But I tend to fall into the camp that argues Amunhotep III was quite ill in his later years, and perhaps not so much in control. There is still debate on this, but if the mummy believed to be Amunhotep III is indeed him, he was obese and in poor health well before his death. From there arises the theory that the great royal lady Tiye was dispatched from Akhetaten to help maintain the government and its concerns outside the exclusive city of the Akhenaten. Should you favor this theory of an ill Amunhotep III, then whether or not there was a co-regency, the criminal of Akhetaten was already liberally exercising and expanding his personal beliefs.

Quote:
Late a night, a regal chariot comes charging the the Valley of the Kings, horses all lathered up from a long ride from Armana. The driver pushes poor Smenky in his girly rishii coffin off the back - KER-PLUNK!! And dashes off.


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