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Egyptian Archaeology.
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2006 8:08 pm    Post subject: Egyptian Archaeology. Reply with quote

read Does anyone know of any good archaeology books on Egypt?
The reason I'm asking is, my first two assignments in the Eyptology Course I'm doing, are targeted towards archaeologists and archaeological discoveries generally, i.e. not specifically to do with Egypt. The course did advise on partcular archaeology books to read, most are general, and one is about Roman arcaeology (but none catered to Egypt).
The thing is I've actually been enjoying learning about the archaeological discoveries of the world, but would also like to broaden my knowledge of archaeology in Egypt. I have come across some books in this area, but I don't really know which ones are any good.

I'm sorry to be bugging everyone on book recommendations again, but I am an avid reader. Razz

Also I'm hoping that I've posted this in the right section, I wasn't quite sure if it was books/homework. Confused

Anyones help would be very much appreciated - thanks in advance. Exclamation

TTFN Wink
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anneke
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2006 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really like Ancient Egypt: The Great Discoveries
by Nicholas Reeves link to amazon.com

It has a nice overview of (many) of the great discoveries.

Tombs, treasures, mummies: Seven great discoveries of Egyptian archaeology (Unknown Binding) by Dennis C Forbes
is another one I really like. It's out of print and even the second hand copies are now pricey ($150), but it profiles the discoveries of the tombs of Tutankhamen, Yuya & Tuya, Maihirpri, Kha & Merit, KV55, and also describes the two royal caches found.
Maybe your library will have it?
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2006 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Maybe your library will have it?


It's strange, but that thought doesn't occur to me very often Exclamation I generally just buy them, as I tend to forget about taking them back Rolling Eyes I think I'll have to start getting into the habbit of ordering from libraries first before buying, outerwise it'll end up costing me a small fortune. Laughing

Thanks for your advice anneke, I shall try ordering them from library, and most likely investing in them in the near future. Razz
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I generally just buy them, as I tend to forget about taking them back I think I'll have to start getting into the habbit of ordering from libraries first before buying, outerwise it'll end up costing me a small fortune.


I also favor buying them. I have no problem remembering to return books to the library but I'm the kind of guy who likes to write notes in margins, and libraries tend to disapprove of that. Very Happy

As for your book search, you can't go wrong with the one anneke recommended. Additionally I enjoyed The Tomb of Tutankhamen, by Howard Carter himself. It's interesting to read about a famous dig by the person in charge of it.

Last year anneke recommended to me Geoffrey Martin's The Hidden Tombs of Memphis, which is about New Kingdom tombs in the ancient Saqqara necropolis (including the beautiful private tomb of Horemheb). Martin was in charge of these excavations, too. I like to read about discoveries from first-hand accounts.
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Geoffrey Martin's The Hidden Tombs of Memphis


Sounds good! Especially the tomb of Horemheb, and tomb of Tia and Tia. I like to learn from first-hand accounts as well, I just didn't know if they'd be slightly exaggerated. Question

I read the excerpts from the books that you both provided, but I couldn't see anything about Deir el Medina (I know I didn't specifically ask), but just a question - Do any of these books have any information on the archaeological pojects there?
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Do any of these books have any information on the archaeological pojects there?


I've read quite a lot about Deir el Medina, such as Pharaoh's Workers by Leonard H. Lesko. But most of what I've read is based on the culture and peoples and events of the village--not much on the archaeology itself. It's a fascinating subject.

One of our other posters has recommended John Romer's Ancient Lives: The Story of the Pharaoh's Tombmakers, which I'm tempted to buy, too.

It sounds like if you're really looking into archaeological excavation data you might need more precise and professional information. What comes to mind immediately is the archives of Chicago's Oriental Institute. Luckily I live in Chicago and as a new docent at the O.I. I can just drive there to visit the archives, but I'm sure there's plentiful information available through the website. Unforunately I'm terrible at navigating my way through most websites and I couldn't seem to find the helpful pages.

If I remember correctly anneke once provided us a link to these archives, so you might want to PM her and ask if she has that link. There is lots of information you can download right from their site, so I'm sure there's useful stuff in there. (I just downloaded a nifty Hittite dictionary, for instance. It would help, though, if I knew something about the Hittite language.)

Sorry I couldn't be more helpful. I feel bad, so I'll end this post with a cool little arial photo of the Deir el Medina site. Wink


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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 2:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's the Oriental Institute website:
http://oi.uchicago.edu/OI/default.html

There's a page with electronic resources:
http://oi.uchicago.edu/OI/OI_Electronic_Resources.html

The best source for online books is:
http://www.etana.org/abzu/

This is a database which will direct you to websites and pdf files of artcles and books you can download.

Here's an example of something you could download:
http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/obj/s4/f2/dsk2/ftp04/mq22097.pdf

Quote:
"This thesis is an examination of the goals and methods of social archaeology. This is accomplished by examining the history of archaeological thought and the factors which gave rise to the need for a social archaeology. Then, the social archaeological method is explained and finally is applied in a case study which seeks to understand social power structures from wall art which decorated the walls of the private tombs of the tomb builders during the New Kingdom of ancient Egypt. The purpose of this case study is to demonstrate how a social archaeological study would work. The thesis concludes with some remarks on the positive and negative points of the socialarchaeological method."
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 2:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't remember if anyone mentioned this to you, but you may want to check the David Brown Book Co. They once in a while have some amazing sales and they have one of the best collections:
http://www.oxbowbooks.com/

HAve you looked at the Deir el Medina Database?
http://www.leidenuniv.nl/nino/dmd/dmd.html

It's fun to browse Very Happy

And check out the pages on osiris.net which describe the tombs of the craftsmen in Thebes. There are some really good pictures and descriptions there.
http://www.osirisnet.net/tombes/artisans/e_artis1.htm
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
There's a page with electronic resources:


I eventually found that page on the O.I. website for myself and have been having all sorts of fun with it. LOL It's 1:40 in the morning and I think I'm done downloading hundreds of pages of PDFs for the night. What a great resource. I'm especially interested in that PDF on scarabs and seals. There's that one on taxes and tax receipts of the Ptolemaic Period but I decided to skip that. Very Happy

I didn't find anything there on Deir el Medina unfortunately.

Quote:
HAve you looked at the Deir el Medina Database?


I'm familiar with that website myself and actually checked it out for Daughter_Of_SETI but wasn't sure if there was anything there for her that might be useful in this regard. Maybe I'm wrong about that. I did enjoy the link to the Petrie Museum.
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

anneke, thanks for all the links they're really interesting, it'll most likely be a couple of days before I've had enough time to go through it all in detail, but it's been extremely helpful, thanks!

anneke wrote
Quote:
I can't remmber if anyone mentioned this to you, but you may want to check the David Brown Book Co. They once in a while have some amazing sales and they have one of the best collections:


Yes I do keep looking on that site, kmt_sesh actually gave me the link to it previously for another book.

kmt_sesh wrote
Quote:
Sorry I couldn't be more helpful, I feel bad


You shouldn't feel too bad, I think you underestimate how helpful you really are. Razz Also that is a beautiful picture that you posted.

kmt_sesh wrote
Quote:
I've read quite a lot about Deir el Medina, such as Pharaoh's Workers by Leonard H. Lesko. But most of what I've read is based on the culture and peoples and events of the village--not much on the archaeology itself.


Actually that book sounds really good even though its not to do with the archaeology. I've been completely fascinated by Deir el Medina ever since I saw a documentary on the village a couple of years ago, hosted by Bob Brier. The archaeology part is more to do with my coursework, but learning about the people in the village would be amazing Exclamation

Thank you both for your help though you've given me a lot to go on Wink
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I've been completely fascinated by Deir el Medina ever since I saw a documentary on the village a couple of years ago, hosted by Bob Brier. The archaeology part is more to do with my coursework, but learning about the people in the village would be amazing


It really is a fascinating site and the more I study Deir el Medina the more interested I become. So much of what we understand about New Kingdom civil structure and domestic life and literature comes right from there. It is one of the single-most important sites in Egypt.

I don't remember ever seeing the special by Brier. I searched the web sites for the History Channel and Discovery Channel and came up blank. That's too bad because I'd like to see it.

I'm glad we could help you out, Daughter_Of_SETI. And check out that book by Lesko--it really is a good one. Wink
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 10:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh, the Bob Brier documentary may have been by National Geographic Wink
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the clue, Daughter_Of_SETI. I checked with National Geographic and came up blank there, too. It's possible this special was never released on DVD. Confused
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, I've also spent some time today trying to find it for you, but I did come across a site that says he can't get certain programs put on DVD (apperantly the makers don't think there's enough demand for them), it's a shame though Crying or Very sad 'cause it was really good and I was going to buy it myself - looks like I'll just have to wait for the re-runs on sky Very Happy
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
it's a shame though 'cause it was really good and I was going to buy it myself - looks like I'll just have to wait for the re-runs on sky


I'll double-check our gift shop at the museum. They sell a wide range of DVDs and VHSs, but I don't recall having seen this one. Yeah, it's too bad, because it sounds like an interesting one.
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