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Styler78
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2009 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am currently reading E.A. Wallis Budge "Egyptian Religion- Egyptian ideas of the future life. This is the 1987 reprint by Arkana.

So far i have found this to be quite interesting. He is doing his best to try to persuade me that Egypt only ever had one god (Ra) and that all other gods/ goddesses are forms of Ra. It is in "Old English" so at times can be tricky to understand, but nevertheless very interesting.

One the second chapter on Osiris is about Osiris gently taking over many of the roles of Ra. Starting with the Osiris myth (Seth, Isis, Horus etc) and now moving on to how Osiris became the equal to Ra.

Very interesting and including many resources, such as the Papyrus of Ani.

I do have many other books on the go, all Egypt related, but mainly for cross referencing general studies. Also i will get my teeth into my books and Ebooks on studying Hieroglyphs, once i have more time....
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Meritamon
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 5:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hatchepsut- The Female Pharaoh by Joyce Tyldesley
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eccles
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 3:36 am    Post subject: The Lost Tombs of Thebes: Ancient Egypt: Life in Paradise Reply with quote

I just got this magnificent Tome:

The Lost Tombs of Thebes: Ancient Egypt: Life in Paradise (Hardcover)
~ Zahi Hawass (Author), Sandro Vannini (Photographer)

I got it from Amazon.Com US$50 plus freight with some DVDs. I hate to know what it would cost in Australia if you could even get it here. The bookshops here charge like wounded bulls.

It is the best book I have bought for a long time. Contrary to experience I have had with Thames & Hudson books it seem to be well bound. Other books I have had from T & H fall apart quickly.

The are many double fold out picture pages showing the tomb interiors. The photography is suberb and the printing on good paper is excellent. It will take me a while to read all the text. Zahi Hawass at his best, of course.
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Leena
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2010 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toby A.H. Wilkinson "Early Dynastic Egypt". I find it a very good book.

Leena Smile
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Montuhotep88
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2010 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I liked Wilkinson's "Early Dynastic Egypt." Very good...

Currently, I'm reading Handbook of Oriental Studies (HdO) #83, Ancient Egyptian Chronology, edited by Erik Hornung, Rolf Krauss, and David Warburton. Not exactly "beach" reading, but I'm really looking forward to getting deeper into it, being something of a chronology nerd anyway.

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Styler78
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2010 1:50 pm    Post subject: Tutankhamun, by Nick Drake (Fiction) Reply with quote

This is the first time i have bought a Fiction book which relates to Anciernt Egypt. I have always been sceptical as i am a fan of fact (or speculation based on it).

I am approx 100 pages into it and am hooked. It is reviewed here:

http://www.booksattransworld.co.uk/catalog/book.htm?command=Search&db=twmain.txt&eqisbndata=0593054067

So far the main character in the book, Rahotep has been called out to 2 murders, been called to the Malcata Palace by Ankhesenamun and has even spoken to Maia, Tutankhamuns Wet Nurse.

The descriptions of Thebes are very clear and i have been able to envisage well the scenes of the Opet Festival and the surrounding Theban Necropolis with relative ease due to the way the book has been written and i cannot wait to pick it up again this evening for another installment.

As you may tell, i am no book reviewer, but the link provided will tell you a bit more, thanks
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Naunacht
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 08, 2010 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just finished "Truth is the Soul of the Sun: a Biographical Novel of Hatshepsut Maatkare" by Maria Isabel Pita.

The book is very much a mixed bag of historical novel, erotic fiction and Egyptian metaphysics with a decidedly new age air.

First the good. The author has done her research and incorporates many of the latest findings on Hatshepsut and her reign although she strongly rejects the identification of KV60 B as Hatshepsut. In part this may be that she sees Hatshepsut as a woman who used her beauty and sexuality to entrance the men around her--kind of hard to see the admittedly overweight and none too pretty 50 something royal lady found in the tomb of Sitre pulling that off--although I might say, Catherine the Great was no raving beauty either and she pulled it off.

The caracterizations are interesting. Hatshepsut comes off as a woman absorbed with her divine sexuality and truly believes in her own divinity. Hapusoneb is the power behind Hatshepsut a man with whom she shares a mystical and sexual bond that begins when she becomes Gods Wife of Amon at a fairly young age. Senenmut, here demoted from the creative genius behind Djeser Djeseru (which may, of course be the more historically accruate view than that of him as the sole architect of this masterpiece) to creative genius designer of statues of himself, and closet agnostic, comes off as a thoroughly decent guy who loves Hatshepsut and her daughter Neferura and is treated pretty shabily by her--He's no match for Hapsoneb in the sack--or in the sanctuary of Amon for that matter--and she feels really, really guilty about it--hence all the titles and statues and unprecendented honors. Nefrure comes off as a wonderfully adorable child who grows into a strong willed but likeable teenager who's in the seriously difficult position of having to wait for her much younger half brother Thutmose III to become a man. She predictably falls for a handsome young assistant to Senmut and this should cause a great deal of conflict and drama but somehow it doesn't.

That's the worst part about this novel. There's no conflict, no drama or at least nothing that's not dealt with in a few lines. I find it rather hard to believe that some young whippersnapper could have been making googly eyes at the real Maatkare's beloved daughter and not find himself packed off on the first ship out of Waset to be given some special post like special assistant to the ambassador to Punt--if he was lucky enough to still be alive that is. It's rather disconcerting watching Hatshepsut and Senmut acting like a pair of hand wringing suburban parents who's daughter has fallen for the high school dropout leader of some really bad punk band. Their solution though is very 21st century--make sure she has good birth control and hope she gets over it and marries Thutmose III like she's supposed to. As for young Thutmose, he doesn't seem to really care that the girl who's suppsed to be his great royal wife is cavorting with some "Overseer of Flowers", once again, given the man he was to become--I don't think so. But maybe that's just me.

This lack of conflict is really pretty weird. I mean a woman proclaims herself King of Egypt and no one, except for the mother of the infant Thutmose III is upset about it? Hey, no problem, King's Mother Isis is whisked off to Memphis where she spends her time creating the mother of all tombs for herself and is never seen again. Hapusoneb and Senmut are both in love with the queen and share her bed--you'd think there'd be some drama there--and there is one scene at the Feast of Drunkenness when it looks like they might actually come to blows--but no. The author's solution is--er--different--and one that I can't describe in a family friendly website.

WARNING: IF YOU ARE EASILY UPSET BY GRAPHIC DEPICTIONS OF SEXUAL ACTS BETWEEN MULTIPLE CHARACTERS OF BOTH SEXES YOU PROBABLY DO NOT WANT TO READ THIS BOOK.

Despite its flaws I did read this through to the end and found it oddly compelling. Hatshepsut groupies like myself may want to check it out for the interesting caracterizations but I don't recommend it for everyone--unless of course you are really into graphic depictions of sexual acts between multiple partners of both sexes and New Age tinged Egyptian metaphysics.
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Queen-Seknofret
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Im currently reading Amarna Sunest, The Heretic Queen, and the Book of the Dead does anyone have any suggestions on any other good books?
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Hekat
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PostPosted: Wed May 26, 2010 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm reading the Tomb-Builders of the Pharaohs by Morris Bierbrier.

It is a fascinating insight into the lives of the workers, it is illustrated (in B & W) with lots of images of ostraca, tombs etc but has a lot of human interest too.

I learnt today that Menna (the owner of my favourite tomb in the Nobles) had a delinquent son who argued with the door keeper, got involved in a court case over some lost property & was accused of having an affair with a fellow workmen's wife Rolling Eyes

Another book which I loved reading was Shahhat an Egyptian by Richard Critchfield, which although not about AE tells the true story of life in Medinat Habu in the 1970's. So much of which harks back to the times of the Pharoahs & things are done in a certain way "because that has always been so!!
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Wepwawet29
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2010 12:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm currently reading Richard Wilkinson's The Complete Temples of Ancient Egypt. I'm also rereading a novel entitled The Scroll of Saqqara by Pauline Gedge, which is based on the story of Setna Khaemwaset and his search for the Book of Thoth.
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neseret
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2010 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am presently reading

The Question of Evil in Ancient Egypt, by S.J. Mpay Kemboly.

This book is a fascinating study of the Egyptian concept of evil and its meaning in Egyptian culture during the pharaonic period. Written by a Jesuit priest as his dissertation while at Oxford, I think it takes someone this well-trained in philosophy and religion to explicate the Egyptian sense of wrongdoing/evil/sin. Kemboly does a thorough and excellent job, and in a way that holds your interest.

At 412 pages, this is not light reading for anyone, but a particularly good and in-depth work if you find this sort of thing as interesting as I do.

HTH.
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kylejustin
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2010 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

im 100 pages into the illiad. it is difficult not getting distracted, but it is easy to understand, which surprises me. the speeches get a little boring, as do some of the battle scenes, but im am enjoying it at the moment.
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NefertariMut
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2010 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right now, I'm reading the "Ramses" Series (5 in total) by Christian Jacq. It is pretty good but I find it to be very easy reading and I like to be challenged more.
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Bennubird
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2010 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm reading Vampires Encounters with the Undead Very Happy
Nothing to do with Egypt. Oh well its great Laughing
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Toth
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 27, 2010 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hekat wrote:
I'm reading the Tomb-Builders of the Pharaohs by Morris Bierbrier.

It is a fascinating insight into the lives of the workers, it is illustrated (in B & W) with lots of images of ostraca, tombs etc but has a lot of human interest too.

I learnt today that Menna (the owner of my favourite tomb in the Nobles) had a delinquent son who argued with the door keeper, got involved in a court case over some lost property & was accused of having an affair with a fellow workmen's wife Rolling Eyes

Another book which I loved reading was Shahhat an Egyptian by Richard Critchfield, which although not about AE tells the true story of life in Medinat Habu in the 1970's. So much of which harks back to the times of the Pharoahs & things are done in a certain way "because that has always been so!!


So what does this tell us? That nothing is really new and that the writing team of The Bold and Beautiful, Dallas and similar garbage easily could have lived in AE
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