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anneke
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 20, 2004 8:41 pm    Post subject: NEWS Reply with quote

This is already old news, but I think one of the biggest discoveries in recent times has been the tomb of Maia, Tutankhamen's wet nurse.
Her tomb was discovered in Saqqara by the French Egyptologis Alain Zivie.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 20, 2004 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

(Jan 2004) The mummified remains of a Lion were found in the tomb of King Tut's wet nurse Maia.

An article will appear in "Nature".

I quoted the abstract from: http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v427/n6971/abs/427211a_fs.html



Quote:
Archaeology: A lion found in the Egyptian tomb of Maïa

CÉCILE CALLOU*§, ANAÏCK SAMZUN†§ & ALAIN ZIVIE‡§

* MNHN et CNRS (UMR 5197), Paris, France
† INRAP, Paris, et UMR 7041, Nanterre, France
‡ CNRS (UMR 8567), Paris, France
§ Mission Archéologique Française du Bubasteion, Saqqara, Egypt

e-mail: az.hypogees@wanadoo.fr

Lions are mentioned by classical scholars and in pharaonic inscriptions as being among the sacred animals that were bred and buried in the Nile valley. And yet no specimens have been found in Egypt — until the excavation of the Bubasteion necropolis at Saqqara. Here we describe a complete skeleton, once a mummy, of a male lion (Panthera leo) that was discovered there, buried among the cats' catacombs created during the last centuries BC and occupying the much older tomb of Maïa, wet-nurse to the king Tutankhamun (from the New Kingdom, fourteenth century BC). This important find at a site that was dedicated to the feline goddess Bastet (also known as Bubastis) confirms the status of the lion as a sacred animal during the Late and Greek periods.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 20, 2004 8:57 pm    Post subject: Tut liked red wine Reply with quote

(March 2004) : Tutankhamen liked red wine Very Happy

A study has shown that jars in Tut's tomb contained red wine.
see:http://www.touregypt.net/egyptnews.htm

(Not really earth shattering news, but fun.)
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2004 11:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hehehe, old Tut's been holding out on us Laughing
I'm bookmarking that news site Smile
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found mention of this statue on display in the Bolton museum


from:http://www.boltonmuseums.org.uk/HTML/index_egypt_new_exhibit.asp

This statue is identified as an Amarna Princess.
Quote:
  The 52cm high sculpture is carved in translucent Egyptian alabaster (calcite), and represents a royal female of the Amarna Period (c.1350-1334 B.C.). The head, arms and lower legs have not survived but it is believed she is one of the daughters of the Pharaoh Akhenaten and his chief queen, Nefertiti.


How they know it's a daughter of Nefertiti and not Nefertiti herself I don't know. There don't seem to be any inscriptions I can see.

The only thing I noticed is part of the wig. This does not seem to be a wig regularly worn by Nefertiti (although there are images of her in a tri-partite wig). I wonder if that's why they tend to identify the figure as a daughter.

There are only two other pieces like it. One in the Louvre in Paris, the other in Philadelphia. Maybe those pieces factor in the identification?
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should note that the article dates to september 2003. So technically not NEWS Laughing But I thought it was interesting.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Compare to these two pieces from the Louvre collection:

<no longer available>

The one on the left is closer to the statue at the Bolton museum.
The statue of what is clearly an Amarna Princess shows the lock of hair on her right shoulder.
I wonder if this is what the head of the Bolton museum piece would have looked like. (Just idle speculation on my part Very Happy )
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Last edited by anneke on Tue Mar 21, 2006 12:59 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Segereh
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe just idle speculation, but very insighted. Smile
Never seen that first statue before, but it reminded me to the Louvre's statue as well - got to love that one. The right side of the head (and the wig in particular) doesn't show though, giving probable rise to the theory of it resembling the sidelocked wig of the Amarna princess u've shown. But the lack of something doesn't necessarily imply something never (initally) was there, so I was thinking it to be more like the heavier wigs, as worn by fully grown up women. Seeing the curves on the alabaster statue that would make sense?



Something more like that?
Wouldn't be "usual" for Nef as well though.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the statue from the Bolton museum the other shoulder seems to be smooth though. I.e. not rough edges as it would be if the other part of the wig had broken off.

The body is definitely that of a mature woman though Laughing
Seems to limit the image as being that of Nefertiti, Meritaten, Ankhesenpaaten, or maybe Kiya?

Looks like the statues may have been in a "striding ppose" as well. Both the Louvre and the Bolton statue seem to have the left leg in front of the right leg.
I wonder where the statues were from? A temple most likely?
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

U might be right again there.
What I was wondering...
Next to the 'striding' the statue seems 'turned'. Like not completely 'fixed' as usual. I don't know precisely how to say that, but if u look at the waste, she seems to be in motion or something. Much alike Greek statues. It might be the photograph or the damage, but it looks weird.

I would definitely love this one to be Ankhes's or Kiya's. Smile
Somehow I doubt statues like these ever winding up in a temple though.
Maybe more something for 'private use'? Like in a palace?
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I noticed that too. The body seems to be a bit in an S-shape. Her hips are slightly tilted.
Gives the impression of dancing. Very Happy

On this page are more views:
http://www.boltonmuseums.org.uk/HTML/index.asp


The picture on the right also shows her shoulders seem to be turned.

It gives the impression of animation.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lady does look rather "Rubenesque" doesn't she? Cool

It says on the museum wesite that the piece had been in private hands for 110 years. So it must have been discovered in the 1890's.
I wonder where they found it?
It was in the hands of a Lancashire family for all that time. Must have been bought on the illegal market I presume.
I guess it could have come from a tomb as well.

On the picture above you see a block of stone in the back of the statue. Would that indicate it was affixed to a wall at some point? Or would it have been a free standing statue?
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

anneke wrote:
On the picture above you see a block of stone in the back of the statue. Would that indicate it was affixed to a wall at some point? Or would it have been a free standing statue?


I think it was meant as a support mainly. With the weight apparenly not being completely balanced (yes, I'm talking about the rubenesque back side), you could expect such a thing. If it wasn't for the piece of the wig I would consider it a possibility being a Late Period statue though. The curves, drapery of the dress and general style really look like other examples of Amarna art, but I think you have little to go on not knowing the actual source of the statue (not something 'new' in Egyptology). The twist in the statue seems odd and unfamiliar for more ancient Egyptian styles, even for Amarna art. My guess would be this could actually be a Hellen-inspired statue, were it not for the piece of the wig which would seem very archaic basing on what's left to see of it. So u have both the style of the dress, body and piece-of-wig to prefer an Amarna-aging, but then you still have the peculiar twist and the possibility of a retrospective piece of art which would make it practically imossible to date. With that I mean you have several periods of time when artisans looked back on older styles (Ramesside art being a perfect example of looking back on about every style ever used from the Old Kingdom over the statues of Amenemhat and even some of the Amarna influences). This surely happened during the Greek period as well. Would it be far-fetched or presumptuous to say this could be a work of art from Ptolemaic times?
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anneke
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 2004 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting. I didn't think the later periods sculpted the female form in this way.

The museum seems fairly sure in their identification as an Amarna Princess. Maybe they know more, and the place of discovery gives more information???

This piece of the statue is 52 cm high, and it's made from alabaster (calcite?)

I don't know enough about egyptian sculpture to see if that gives any added information.
The 52cms would mean that the entire sculpture was smaller than life-size? Adding the head and lower legs would maybe get you to 70-80 cms total??
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 2004 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

anneke wrote:
Interesting. I didn't think the later periods sculpted the female form in this way.

It doesn't have to be like that, but I remembered a bust of Cleopatra, dug up from the Mediterranean in Alexandria excavations, which reminded me of the style (pleated garment, voluptuous curves).

anneke wrote:
The museum seems fairly sure in their identification as an Amarna Princess. Maybe they know more, and the place of discovery gives more information???

I would indeed find it a little arrogant to disagree with people who obviously know more than I do, but I've always liked reasonable doubt. Smile

anneke wrote:
This piece of the statue is 52 cm high, and it's made from alabaster (calcite?). I don't know enough about egyptian sculpture to see if that gives any added information. The 52cms would mean that the entire sculpture was smaller than life-size? Adding the head and lower legs would maybe get you to 70-80 cms total??

You have a nice view of it on the same site you mentioned, when a lady is standing next to the statue. This would indeed be normal, but mostly considering the material: sesj (Egyptian Calcite, better known as alabaster) is a rather fine and "soft" kind of stone. U wouldn't be able to erect a colossus with this material, but refined and smaller artworks are a perfect option.
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