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huny
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 11:15 am    Post subject: How To Say Reply with quote

Bastet, Am going to be calling my kitten Bastet but as am looking around i see place's say that the "tet" is silent can you tell me how i say this


is is just like Bash as in cash but bash? What i really would like is for someone to say is so i can hear it spoken.

Any help would be great
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe Bastet is pronounced exactly how it's written (Bas-tet). Although Bastet can also be written 'Bast', but again it's just said how it's written. I've never heard it pronounced Bash.

I have heard it spoken on Discovery Channel Ancient Egyptian themed programs before, but I can't think of which ones in particular, unfortunately. I do remember mention of Bastet in the pilot episiode of Dark Angel in which the goddess was spoken as 'Bast'. Smile
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huny
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So is it Bast like Fast? might go onto pal talk to night and find someone that speaks egyptain
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

huny wrote:
So is it Bast like Fast?

As far as I know, it is.

huny wrote:
might go onto pal talk to night and find someone that speaks egyptain

I've not actually heard of Pal talk before, but there are some Egyptian members on this forum (I'm not sure how many of them frequent the forum regularly though). The closest language to ancient Egyptian is Coptic, but I don't know how much that differs from Arabic, or from English.

The choice between Bastet or Bast is just a personal preference, they're both completely correct, it just depends on the hieroglyphs used to spell out her name (more precisely, if the bread-loaf glyph is used to sound out an extra 't', I think). Hope that helped, if not, someone that has more knowledge on their language may give you better information. Very Happy
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kat
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You've got it right, the second bread loaf glyph is the extra 'T'.

My littlest cat's name is TadiBastet, 'She Whom Bastet Gave'. I think it's a wonderful way to honor the Goddess in this maner. :)
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Anthony Holmes
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 8:53 pm    Post subject: Bast not like Fast Reply with quote

On each occasion I have heard the word in lectures etc. those in the know (presumably) pronounce it BUST (and BUSTET). Love your choice of name!
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Shepenmut
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bast There is no "short a" like in cat or hatch in Kemetic. The only a is a sound like the a in "father." Bast does not ever rhyme with cast. There *is* a word in English spelled bast and pronounced to rhyme with cast, but it means the pithy fibers of hemp plants, not the name of a Kemetic goddess.

Quoted from a friend/egyptologist. Very Happy
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2006 1:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whether "Bastet" or "Bast" depends on who you read or talk to. Many argue the former is the name of the goddess and the latter derives form the name of the capital of her cult center. This argument is worth trusting, in my opinion.

Quote:
Bast There is no "short a" like in cat or hatch in Kemetic. The only a is a sound like the a in "father."


Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs do not contain true vowels so the question is moot. Modern scholars render such glyphs as the Egyptian vulture and outstretched arm as one type of "a" sound or another, but none of these accurately represent the native sounds to which these glyphs are attributed. Neither of these two examples is a sound that exists in most Western languages, but both are still common to Semitic tongues. The Egyptian vulture, for instance, is actually a glottal stop. About the closest example I can provide in English is the stop in breath produced before each syllable in the interjection "uh-uh," and it's a clumsy example at best. The outstretched arm, my other example, is the Semitic ayin, and to my knowledge there isn't even an English example I can provide. It's similar to the "a" in "father" but pronounced in a kind of strangled way, at the back of the throat. A common ancient Egyptian example, though, is the word maat (m3't), which actually contains both the glottal stop and ayin.

But that's enough of that. Laughing

Of course Bastet is a great name for a cat. I pronounce it like "Bahs-tet," the "a" like in "father," but we can't know for certain how the ancient Egyptians said this goddess's name.
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kat
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2006 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Whether "Bastet" or "Bast" depends on who you read or talk to. Many argue the former is the name of the goddess and the latter derives form the name of the capital of her cult center. This argument is worth trusting, in my opinion.


I've read arguments from linguists who say the second 'T' in Bastet is a LP development, by scribes to ensure the pronunciation of that 'T' sound. But this does not explain the fact that the earliest written form of Her name, from the Second Dynasty, clearly has two 'T's, as does the Fourth Dynasty inscription at Giza. These examples are both far earlier than the LP, so I'm in favor of the two 'T' spelling myself.

And yes, the common wisdom claims her name means simply 'She from [or of] Bast', but this doesn't take into account the names of other lioness goddesses, 'The Terrifying One', 'The Powerful One', 'The Scratcher', etc. etc. So I'm inclined to agree with Tamara Siuda, MA, of the Oriental Instutute of U. of Chi. when she translates the Goddess's name as 'The Devouring One'. This is also bourne out by the glyphs that spell her name, p.78 of the Faulkner dictionary. This translation also makes sense when you take into account the ferocious nature of the lioness goddesses.
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2006 4:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I've read arguments from linguists who say the second 'T' in Bastet is a LP development, by scribes to ensure the pronunciation of that 'T' sound. But this does not explain the fact that the earliest written form of Her name, from the Second Dynasty, clearly has two 'T's...


That right there discount or at least strongly refutes the argument made by these linguists. If clear evidence exists to the contrary, these linguists need to re-examine their theory.

Quote:
...but this doesn't take into account the names of other lioness goddesses, 'The Terrifying One', 'The Powerful One', 'The Scratcher', etc. etc. So I'm inclined to agree with Tamara Siuda, MA, of the Oriental Instutute of U. of Chi. when she translates the Goddess's name as 'The Devouring One'.


That might just be. As I understand it Bastet began her existence as a lioness, not just a domestic-style cat, and possessed both kind and fierce aspects in the Pyramid Texts. So there may be something behind Siuda's theory, but it's not one I've personally heard elsewhere so I'm not entirely convinced. Yet. Smile
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