Go to the Egyptian Dreams shop
Egyptian Dreams
Ancient Egypt Discussion Board
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Book of the Dead
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Egyptian Dreams Forum Index -> Mythology and Religion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kmt_sesh
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 7099
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2006 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I spent a happily long and full day at the Field Museum today, and as long as I was there I snapped a few new photos that go with the topic of this discussion. Earlier I mentioned the other Osiris-and-plinth statuette we have, with the missing figure from the front, so here it is:



I hope it works okay. I tested it on Internet Explorer as well as Safari and it worked fine on my end. This is also a Late Period piece, and you can see how something square in shape is missing from the front of the plinth. There may have been a small sarcophagus with Sokar bird there, but it's hard to say without having seen it in its original condition.

My favorite Book of the Dead we have on display at the Field belonged to a priest of Amun named Khonsurenpe. It probably comes from Dynasty 19, perhaps Dynasty 20. Here's a scene from it, which shows part of Spell 125 (the weighing of the heart in this case):



It's a beautifully preserved papyrus and is about thirteen feet long. Because of that I really can't show a picture of the whole thing that would do it justice. Click here for a scene of Khonsurenpe at his offering table with a Sem priest before it, and here for a beautiful depiction of the Sun Hymn (this is one of my favorite scenes from the papyrus).

Nearby is the Book of the Dead of a Third Intermediate Period woman named Isty. She was a chantress in the temple of Amun. Isty's Book of the Dead is much smaller than Khonsurenpe's and contains only a couple of spells, but the colors are still vibrant. Below is the scene where she is being welcomed by Osiris:



One thing I've always liked about her papyrus is that it contains all forty-two recitations from the Negative Confession, which you don't often see. Here's a wider view of that section of the papyrus, and you can see Isty dressed in a beautiful pleated gown and facing the Negative Confession. And here's a closeup of the Negative Confession, which is also part of Spell 125.

We have two more Books of the Dead at the Field. Both are exceedingly hard to photograph, but this one dates to the Late Period. It has suffered water damage at some time, and the photo really doesn't do it justice, but the quality of the script is outstanding; the scribe who wrote it was very talented.

Finally, here's one that dates to the Ptolemaic Period. I apologize for the poor quality of the photo, but this was actually the best one of several I shot. It's written completely in hieratic, which was customary for that time, and is not of the quality of the previous three. The script is shaky and the figures of the gods are somewhat clumsily drawn (you can see the weighing of the heart near the top-center), but this is a good example of a papyrus prepared from someone of simpler means.

Smile
_________________


Visit my blog!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kmt_sesh
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 7099
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2006 1:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe I've fixed the link to the first Osiris-and-plinth photo I tried to post (the one without anything at the front), so let's give it a try. I'm posting it here again:


_________________


Visit my blog!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Shepenmut
Scribe
Scribe


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 177
Location: Bronx NY

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
I believe I've fixed the link to the first Osiris-and-plinth photo I tried to post (the one without anything at the front), so let's give it a try. I'm posting it here again:



Oh I love that pic of Ptah-Sokar-Osiris. I've been researching him for the past month.

Here are pics of Ptah-Sokar-Osiris from The Global Egyptian Muesum.
http://tinyurl.com/yegj8e
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Shepenmut
Scribe
Scribe


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 177
Location: Bronx NY

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
kmt_sesh wrote:
As for the other mode you mentioned, a statuette of Osiris (a.k.a., Sokar-Osiris, Ptah-Sokar-Oisiris) was made to stand atop a hollow plinth with a hidden drawer, and a Book of the Dead might be rolled up and placed inside there. I believe this was more of a Late Period practice.


Like the following wooden figure of Ptah-Sokar-Osiris facing a hawk. It also probably used to contain spells from the Book of the Dead in the bottom. It dates from 525-332 BC (from the Manchester Museum).


I like that one too. Wink
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kmt_sesh
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 7099
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Several of our coffins and other burial equipment at the Field Museum have devotional inscriptions with Ptah-Sokar-Osiris. There's ample information about him. What kind of research have you been doing, Shepenmut?
_________________


Visit my blog!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Shepenmut
Scribe
Scribe


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 177
Location: Bronx NY

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
Several of our coffins and other burial equipment at the Field Museum have devotional inscriptions with Ptah-Sokar-Osiris. There's ample information about him. What kind of research have you been doing, Shepenmut?


Mainly how to identify him from Ptah-Sokar and Sokar-Wesir. I learned how to write his name in glyphs. Now I'm looking into his titles. Could you show me these devotional inscriptions with Ptah-Sokar-Osiris.

This is Ptah-Sokar-Wesir in his dwarf form.





These are his glyphs.



Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kmt_sesh
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 7099
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think I have any close-up photos of the inscriptions. They're mainly on coffins and a canopic chest or two, and zooming in to photograph the glyphs can be exceedingly difficult in the dim lighting in that part of the hall. Most of these objects in our exhibit date from the Third Intermediate Period and Late Period, however, and I also distinguish them by the hieroglyphic spellings.

About the only thing I could find in my photo collection that I can show you is a Dynasty 22 coffin, so I put together this image for you:



Here (marked in the red rectangles) the name is recorded as Ptah-Osiris-Sokar. This is the outer coffin of a woman whose title was Consort of Amun-Re. The photo isn't so great. Not far from it stands a lovely black coffin (Dynasty 21) of a doorkeeper in the temple of Amun, whose name was Nespasobek. He has "Ptah-Sokar-Osiris" near the start of his offering formula. In the photo below it's the coffin on the left:



LOL If you look hard enough you just might be able to make out the god's name in the inscription, but I don't have any close-ups of it. The inscription begins: "Words spoken by Ptah-Sokar Osiris..." However, now you've got me curious when I'm at the museum again to see how many times I can find inscriptions bearing "Ptah-Sokar-Osiris" or versions thereof.

Very Happy
_________________


Visit my blog!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Shepenmut
Scribe
Scribe


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 177
Location: Bronx NY

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool thanks kmt_sesh can you find out what words are spoken by Ptah-Sokar-Osiris next time your're at the museum.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kmt_sesh
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 7099
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not a problem, Shepenmut. I actually have them at home; I've copied the inscriptions to most of our coffins so I could translate them for practice. I'm at work right now--shhh Shhh don't tell my boss I'm goofing off--so I'll check it out when I'm home this evening.
_________________


Visit my blog!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Shepenmut
Scribe
Scribe


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 177
Location: Bronx NY

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
Not a problem, Shepenmut. I actually have them at home; I've copied the inscriptions to most of our coffins so I could translate them for practice. I'm at work right now--shhh Shhh don't tell my boss I'm goofing off--so I'll check it out when I'm home this evening.


Ok thanks. Wink
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
anneke
Queen of Egypt
Queen of Egypt


Joined: 23 Jan 2004
Posts: 9305

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is mention of an inscription from Saqqara in the book about the tomb of Tia and Tia.

It contains a hymn to Sokar-Osiris. The text is said to draw from BD180, which is itself a rearranged version of the final litany of Re.

The text (emended with help of earlier sources) is:

[Hail] to you [So]kar-Osiris, lord of the [Sacred] Land, [great god](?) who goes to rest at [all] the appearances of the lord of the Blessed. The Westerners acclaim him: You are the <unique one>, the Mysterious one of the Netherworld, the sacred Ba in the [West], Wenennefer who [shall] exist forever.
Your son Horus is pleased [with you], he has issued decrees on your behalf; may <you> cause (me) to occupy (my) seat (i.e. tomb) in the necropolis in <your> company <in> the Sacred Land, and to behold Re in the morning [...]


Not sure if this is what you were looking for Smile
_________________
Math and Art: http://mathematicsaroundus.blogspot.com/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Shepenmut
Scribe
Scribe


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 177
Location: Bronx NY

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

anneke wrote:
There is mention of an inscription from Saqqara in the book about the tomb of Tia and Tia.

It contains a hymn to Sokar-Osiris. The text is said to draw from BD180, which is itself a rearranged version of the final litany of Re.

The text (emended with help of earlier sources) is:

[Hail] to you [So]kar-Osiris, lord of the [Sacred] Land, [great god](?) who goes to rest at [all] the appearances of the lord of the Blessed. The Westerners acclaim him: You are the <unique one>, the Mysterious one of the Netherworld, the sacred Ba in the [West], Wenennefer who [shall] exist forever.
Your son Horus is pleased [with you], he has issued decrees on your behalf; may <you> cause (me) to occupy (my) seat (i.e. tomb) in the necropolis in <your> company <in> the Sacred Land, and to behold Re in the morning [...]


Not sure if this is what you were looking for Smile


We're looking for Ptah-Sokar-Wesir but this great I know someone who researching Sokar-Wesir.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kmt_sesh
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 13 Nov 2004
Posts: 7099
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 1:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All right, I'm back at home and found my notes on the coffin of Nespasobek (the black one in the photo above). The inscription reads:

"Words spoken by Ptah-Sokar-Osiris, who dwells in the place of burial: that they give a voice offering of bread and beer to the Osiris, doorkeeper of Amun, Nespasobek, true of voice..."

From here the inscription stretches to the ankles of the coffin and is very worn. It would appear that there is another family name, perhaps a son or daughter or wife, who most likely predeceased Nespasobek because the "true of voice" glyphs follow the name. There is no feminine gender marker in the m'3-khrw but that isn't necessarily conclusive. The inscription ends "He is given life" but with the garbled second name I'm not sure if the phrase refers to Nespasobek or to the second name.

On the preceding page of my translations are the inscriptions from another coffin, that of a Late Period man named Harwa. His coffin is packed with inscriptions and I have yet to translate most of them, but right away because of our Ptah-Sokar-Osiris hunt I noticed the words "Ptah-Osiris, foremost of the Westerners, the great god, lord of Abydos..." This and the rest of that part of the inscription sound like very standard stuff for Osiris, but what caught my eye is "Ptah-Osiris" instead of Ptah-Sokar-Osiris or Sokar-Osiris. I am not an expert on this much-blended deity and I admit I don't understand how the Egyptians may have viewed these manifestations differently.
_________________


Visit my blog!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Shepenmut
Scribe
Scribe


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 177
Location: Bronx NY

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh wow thanks kmt_sesh. Very Happy Ptah-Wesir I never heard of him.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Shepenmut
Scribe
Scribe


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 177
Location: Bronx NY

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
On the preceding page of my translations are the inscriptions from another coffin, that of a Late Period man named Harwa. His coffin is packed with inscriptions and I have yet to translate most of them, but right away because of our Ptah-Sokar-Osiris hunt I noticed the words "Ptah-Osiris, foremost of the Westerners, the great god, lord of Abydos..." This and the rest of that part of the inscription sound like very standard stuff for Osiris, but what caught my eye is "Ptah-Osiris" instead of Ptah-Sokar-Osiris or Sokar-Osiris. I am not an expert on this much-blended deity and I admit I don't understand how the Egyptians may have viewed these manifestations differently.


kmt_sesh have you ever heard of Wesir-Sokar?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Egyptian Dreams Forum Index -> Mythology and Religion All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 3 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group