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Field Museum Collection
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree, conorp, it's a lovely vase. I wish we had more Amarna artwork on display.

I'm almost ready to upload my next installment of photos. I had hoped to do it last night but the hour was getting late, and I required my beauty sleep. Hey, I need all the help I can get. Anxious
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could do an "Amarna " set of photos? #Silly hiding
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 11:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

STATUARY

The Field Museum has a large array of statuettes, many of which are votive in nature. Most of the statuettes seen in the photos below come from tombs, temples, or the remains of villages such as Kahun and Deir el Medina. In this installment I am able to share with you the five artifacts the Field Museum considers to be the very best of its Egyptian collection (they are identified as such below).

Deities

Osiris. Late Period, bronze cast. Considered one of the five finest objects in the museum's Egyptian collection. [url]Archival photo[/url] of the whole statuette.

Osiris grouping. Late Period, bronze. An assortment of seated and striding Osiride figurines. The tall example at left is Osiris in lunar form (sun disk with crescent-moon headdress). A second lunar Osiris is in front, smaller and seated.

Osiris on plinth. Late Period, painted wood. Funerary in nature. A text such as the Book of the Dead could be secreted inside the plinth. The atef crown has been broken from the head. Archival photo of two other such Osiris statues in the collection.

Ptah. Late Period, bronze cast with gold applique. Typical mummiform pose with skull cap and composite was scepter. [url]Archival photo[/url] of the statuette, as seen next to a figure of Isis suckling Horus (see below).

Taweret. Late Period, basalt.

Nefertem. Late Period, bronze.

Sobek. Late Period, bronze. Shown wearing an ornamented atef crown. Extended arm once held a now-missing staff.

Neith. Late Period, bronze. Seated (left) and striding. The statuette at right has gold-applique eyes. To the right is a small, crudely cast bronze of Anubis.

Amun. Late Period, bronze. The double-plumes have been broken from the headdress.

Mut and Khonsu. Late Period, bronze. From left: Mut wearing the White Crown, Mut wearing the Double Crown, Khonsu in mummiform pose, Khonsu striding.

Horus compositions. Late Period, all bronzes. At top-right are two traditional statuettes of Isis suckling the infant Horus; at far right is a similar arrangement, although Isis is in the guise of Selket. [url]Archival-photo detail[/url] of Isis as Selket. A detail of the farthest-left statuette. At bottom-center are several arrangements of Horpakhared, "Horus-the-Child," with the typical sidelock and finger to the lips. A detail of Horus as king, on his throne before an obelisk; he is shown wearing the White Crown of Upper Egypt.

Additional Horus compositions. Late Period, all bronzes. At left a striding Horpakhared, wearing the Double Crown; at center, Isis suckling the infant Horus; at right, a seated Horpakhared, wearing a double-plume crown with sun disk.

Horus as falcon. Ptolemaic-Roman Period, black basalt.

Sekhmet. Third Intermediate Period, pink granite. The lioness goddess is shown on her throne, life-sized.

Bastet. Late Period, bronze cast with gold applique. Note the Horus Eye on the chest. Considered one of the finest known bronzes of the goddess. Featured in a reconstructed shrine modeled on an example excavated at Deir el Medina. A wider view showing another statue up and behind, which depicts Bastet in lioness form. [url]Archival-photo closeup[/url] of the face, showing the broad collar and scarab beetle on top of the head; note the whiskers in gold applique, and the ear holes for earrings. [url]Archival photo, profile;[/url] note the gold-applique rings in the tail, suggesting a tabby cat. [url]Archival photo, rear view.[/url]

Votives to Bastet. Late Period, all bronzes. A closeup of the votive at center, showing a manifestation known as Mi-Isis, with elaborate crown.

People

Anonymous man. Old Kingdom, painted wood. Typical rigid style of this period. Note the details in the Nubian wig. Another example from the Old Kingdom, and in similar style.

Khenuef. Middle Kingdom, painted wood. The plinth identifies Khenuef as a soldier.

Anonymous man. Middle Kingdom, quartzite. Note the two small female figures by his lower legs; they are unidentified. Considered one of the five finest objects in the museum's Egyptian collection. [url]Archival photo, profile.[/url]

Senenmut. New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, black granite. Steward and architect of Hatshepsut. Considered one of the five finest objects in the museum's Egyptian collection; further, regarded as one of the five most-intact Senenmut statues known worldwide. The steward carries the infant Neferure, daughter of Hatshepsut (despite the girl's age in this statue, the inscriptions suggest this example was made later in Senemut's career).

Anonymous woman. New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, painted limestone. The inscription does not mention this woman's name but reveals that she was a courtesan of Hatshepsut when the latter was a queen.

Anonymous man. New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, pink granite. Note the cartouche on the right breast, which bears the name of Amuhotep III. The man for whom this bust was made was probably an official in that king's court, although his own name is absent on the bust.

Anonymous man. New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, limestone. On stylistic grounds it has been suggested this is Nakhtmin, a general under Tutankhamun and possibly the son of Aye. The damage to the eyes, nose, and mouth is deliberate. [url]Archival photo.[/url]

Anonymous woman. New Kingdom, painted limestone. Note the bangs of the woman's black hair peeking out from the forehead of her wig. Due to the uncanny resemblance this piece is known at the museum as the "Michael Jackson bust."

Amunmose and family (archival photo). New Kingdom, black granite. Amunmose, a scribe, is at center; at left is his father. At right is either his mother or wife (all that remains substantially of her inscription is "lady of the house"). The mummiform pose of the three figures reveals that they were all dead when this was made.

[url]Amunhotep[/url] (archival photo). New Kingdom, painted sandstone. Amunhotep was a scribe and steward to the high priest of Amun. The stela he holds bears a hymn to Re-Horakhty. (To the left of Amunhotep in this photo is a Late Period, painted wood statuette of Isis; to the right, Nephthys. Both goddesses are in the traditional mourning pose.)

Fertility figurines. Glazed pottery. The two at left are New Kingdom; at right, Late Period. In all three a man is depicted with his grotesque phallus.

Ahmose (archival photo). Third Intermediate Period, black granite. Ahmose was a scribe. [url]Archival photo, profile.[/url]

Montuemhep. Late Period, Dynasty 25, black granite. Montuemhet was mayor of Thebes and Fourth Prophet of Amun. His tomb is TT34 in the Assasif necropolis at Deir el Bahri. Photo of the tomb complex where Montuemhet was buried. Photo of the entrance to his tomb.

Akh-Amun-iru. Late Period, black granite. Badly damaged figure in the block-statue style.

Two men with shrines. Late Period, brown quartzite. The shrines reveal one way people could worship while traveling. Considered one of the five finest objects in the museum's Egyptian collection.

Anonymous man. Ptolemaic-Roman Period, basalt. The wrinkled brow is a means by the artisan to depict old age. The rest of the statue is missing. Considered one of the five finest objects in the museum's Egyptian collection. [url]Archival photo.[/url]

Anonymous woman. Ptolemaic-Roman Period, diorite. This woman's hair is in a Greek style.
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 3:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Anonymous man. Ptolemaic-Roman Period, basalt. The wrinkled brow is a means by the artisan to depict old age. The rest of the statue is missing. Considered one of the five finest objects in the museum's Egyptian collection. Archival photo.

This one is interesting, I like it. I've never seen this piece before, not even in any of the books I have.
Quote:
Anonymous man. New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, limestone. On stylistic grounds it has been suggested this is Nakhtmin, a general under Tutankhamun and possibly the son of Aye. The damage to the eyes, nose, and mouth is deliberate. Archival photo.

I love this one, I can tell it was absolutely gorgeous before it got beat up.
Quote:
Anonymous woman. New Kingdom, painted limestone. Note the bangs of the woman's black hair peeking out from the forehead of her wig. Due to the uncanny resemblance this piece is known at the museum as the "Michael Jackson bust."

LOL Creepy. Hey, maybe Micheal is the reencarnation of this woman....it would explain a lot.....lol.

Thanks for this installment of photographs! Very Happy
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a98/kmt_sesh/FIELD%20MUSEUM/Mi-Isis1.jpg


Wow, this beautiful Smile

Also: I really appreciate you posting these photos, i am really enjoying them.

Also (Again lol) Are you able to do a set of amarna objects at the field. I would love to see them.
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2008 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daniella wrote:
Quote:
This one is interesting, I like it. I've never seen this piece before, not even in any of the books I have.


It is unusual. I personally wouldn't consider it one of our five finest pieces, but then again I'm not a curator. I would call it more distinctive than beautiful. It's reflective of some artwork later in the Late Period and especially through the Ptolemaic Period, when portraiture took on more realistic tones.

Quote:
I love this one, I can tell it was absolutely gorgeous before it got beat up.


That's my own personal favorite bust in the exhibit. It's very beautifully carved. I like the conjecture that it may have been Nakthmin, but I doubt this will ever be definitively established. It's right next to the Michael Jackson bust, so when that one starts to creep you out, you can turn away and look at "Nakthmin." Razz

Quote:
LOL Creepy. Hey, maybe Micheal is the reencarnation of this woman....it would explain a lot.....lol.


LOL Poor woman. Over 3,000 years ago someone carved and painted a lovely likeness of her. She couldn't have known that much later in time there would be a man known as Wacko Jacko. I enjoy pointing to it and asking museum visitors, "Who does this look like?" Almost without fail they recognize the likeness immediately, and then they're creeped out!

conorp wrote:
Quote:
Also: I really appreciate you posting these photos, i am really enjoying them.

Also (Again lol) Are you able to do a set of amarna objects at the field. I would love to see them.


Thanks, conorp. I enjoy showing the photos. Regarding Amarna, as I mentioned earlier the only such pieces we have on display are this vessel and this vessel. That's it for Amarna. It's possible we have more Amarna artifacts in overstorage but, if so, I've never seen them, of course.
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2008 1:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was just looking at this photo: http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a98/kmt_sesh/FIELD%20MUSEUM/AmarnaVase_Blue.jpg

Yes it is beautiful. But im also looking for for info on this: (Circled)



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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2008 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a small sphinx of painted limestone. It dates to the Ptolemaic-Roman Period but is uninscribed, so it is unknown for which king it was made, if any. It's a very nice piece and I neglected to include it with my last installment. If I can remember to, I'll photograph it tomorrow when I'm at the museum.
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2008 2:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
If I can remember to, I'll photograph it tomorrow when I'm at the museum.


Thanks
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 26, 2008 10:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, conorp, I actually remembered the little Sphinx. Want to see it?

Click here!

It's really quite a lovely piece. It was carved from limestone, as I mentioned earlier. Note the nemes headdress and false beard. Pity that it was never inscribed.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 4:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

STELAE & INSCRIPTIONAL MATERIAL

One of the most enjoyable parts of the Egyptian galleries is the large collection of stelae and other inscribed objects. There is too much such material in the collection to share here so I've selected a sampling. I shall refrain from providing translations except where it is pertinent or particularly interesting (and truth be told, I have yet to translate everything seen in this installment).

Stelae

Early Dynastic Period, stela of Sethau. Limestone. Dates to around 2,700 BCE (possibly Dynasty 2), this is the oldest inscribed object in the collection. [url]Archival photo.[/url]

Middle Kingdom, replica of original in the British Museum. "Talking stela" that provides translation for the visitor. Stela of Sensobek, "hereditary prince and count, overseer of priests." Sensobek is at left; at right is his father, Intef, who is deceased and for whom Sensobek created the stela. Intef held the same titles; Sensobek's mother, Bebi, is also mentioned.

Second Intermediate Period, stela of Ibsanysuianu. Limestone. Son of Horherkhutef, mayor and overseer of priests. Ibsanysuianu's wife, Sobekemsauef, also appears on the stela. Archival photo. This stela was crafted from some previously inscribed monument, as can be seen in this closeup of the left side. The older glyphs here appear to be upside-down.

New Kingdom, stela of Nebseni. Limestone. Together with his wife, Satmaatmut, Nebseni is described as rxty ("washerman") in Thebes.

New Kingdom, stela of Userhat. Limestone. Userhat, deceased, a military scribe, is shown at top venerating Osiris and Isis. Along the bottom are members of Userhat's family, before an offering stand: at front (far left) is his sister, Shefese, and five of his children (note the pair of twins at far right). Userhat's wife is not depicted. [url]Archival photo.[/url]

New Kingdom, family stela. Sandstone. One of the most charming stelae on display. Seated at left are the deceased father, Nebnefer, an official in the temple of Amun, and the mother, Tanebet, who is probably still alive. Standing before them are a son named Samut and, behind him, a daughter Mehu. Based on their size and position on the stela, Samut and Mehu may be the eldest children and probably commissioned the stela on behalf of their siblings, who are shown below (three more daughters and two more sons). Difficult to see is a very young and unnamed boy standing by his mother's hip and holding up a lotus as he says, "More beautiful than anything."

New Kingdom (archival photo), family stela. Probably limestone. The file is unlabeled and provides no information, but stylistically the stela may be assigned to the New Kingdom. A simple but beautifully crafted stela showing a husband and wife at top, venerating Osiris on his throne; below are two registers of family members.

New Kingdom, family stela. Limestone. The upper protion is carved in very defined raised relief. At right are the subjects of the stela, Tefket and her husband, Humach, both seated before an offering stand; Humach raises a lotus blossom to his face. At left are their children: at the front is their daughter, Tahuy, and behind her their son, Ahmose, who also holds a lotus blossom to his face. Tahuy is shown pouring a ritual libation for her parents.

Third Intermediate Period, replica of original in the British Museum. "Talking stela" that provides translation for the visitor. Stela of Deniuenkhonsu, Dynasty 22, described as a consort of an official named Aknhkhonsu, who was "chief of diverting injury." Deniuenkhonsu is shown venerating the composite god Re-Horakhty-Atum.

Ptolemaic-Roman Period, stela honoring Horus. Limestone. Uninscribed. Horus in falcon form is shown perched on a plinth and is wearing the Double Crown. Behind him is a sun disk with a uraeus; above is a winged sun disk, with a pair of uraei coming from the disk.

Ptolemaic-Roman Period, stela of Tjeker-Djehuty, a woman. Limestone. On top at left Tjeker-Djehuty venerates Re-Horakhty; at right, Osiris. Her mother, Tarenpet, is mentioned. The prayer on the stela is an adaptation of Spell 15 from the Book of the Dead. Note the surviving pigments.

Ptolemaic-Roman Period, stela of unrecorded man. Limestone. The stela is very abraded and worn but shows the man venerating a procession of deities. The three horizontal registers of inscriptions below this scene are in a mix of hieroglyphic and demotic scripts. Note the surviving pigments.

Ptolemaic-Roman Period, cippus stela. Steatite. Badly damaged but originally of very high quality. At center, now missing, was Horus as Horpakhared ("Horus-the-Child"). The face of the god Bes, still visible at center, would've been just up and behind Horus' head. Horus' feet remain on the plinth, trampling a pair of crocodiles; his hands can be seen clutching serpents. The stela is covered with depictions of beneficent deities and spells, and with scenes of dangerous creatures being subjugated. The user of this stela would've poured water down the front, collected it at the bottom, and drunk it for good health or healing. An oblique view.

False Doors

Old Kingdom, Unis-ankh. Limestone. Dynasty 5. Saqqara. Unis-ankh was the son of King Unis. The false door weighs seven tons. The reddish pigment was applied to make the door look like pink granite. A closeup view. A description of the reconstructed mastaba in which this false door is featured can be found about three-quarters of the way down this page.

Old Kingdom, Iry. Limestone. Fragment of false door. Iry is shown with his wife, Initkaes; both are referred to as "king's aquaintence." Iry's title is "Inspector of Priests." This fragment is in overstorage and is not on public display.

Old Kingdom, Mery. Limestone. Fragment of false door. What remains is chiefly a listing of festivals. As a high official Mery is shown at the bottom wearing a bag-wig and animal-pelt robe (note the tail between his legs), and holds a mace.

Old Kingdom, Senetkau. Limestone. At far left, on the outer door jam, is Senetkau's husband; at far right, two sons and a daughter. The inner door jams and door roll are devoted to Senetkau.

First Intermediate Period, Khety. Limestone. Khety was a temple scribe and seal-bearer to the "master of secrets." The door is much damaged but was heavily inscribed and detailed, providing offering formulae for Khety and listing festivals at which his memory would be honored. [url]Archival photo.[/url]

Middle Kingdom, Sitimpyiker. Limestone. A beautifully inscribed false door listing offering formulae and festivals at which the memory of the woman Sitimpyiker would be honored. [url]Archival photo.[/url]

Bakenrenef

The Field Museum possesses a number of wall reliefs from the tomb of Bakenrenef, northern vizier to Psamtik I Wahibre, Dynasty 26. This Saqqara tomb was particularly beautiful and many museums contain artifacts from it (the sarcophagus, for instance, is in the National Archaeological Museum in Naples, Italy). The Encyclopaedia of Ancient Egyptian Architecture contains this description of the tomb (page 26):

Monumental rock tomb...in the eastern desert escarpment at Saqqara. On the entrance level is a hall with four columns, a deep hall with eight pillars and a cult complex, similar to an Osiris tomb, completely surrounded by a corridor. The burial accommodation occupies two subterranean levels.

The following are photos of some of the wall reliefs in the Field's collection.

Prayer to the goddess personifying the 11th Hour of the Day. Painted limestone. This goddess is one of numerous in a vaulted hall depicting the twelve hours of day and night. She is seen on this wall relief with a star atop her head and holding a was sceptor. The vizier Bakenrenef is shown twice, with his titles and names in the glyphs above his head. He is called "the Sem priest and vizier, Bakenrenef." He wears the spotted leopard robe of the Sem priest. Note the cartouche of King Psamtik at the far (left) end of the inscribed prayer. A closeup of the right side of the prayer.

Scenes of offerings. Painted limestone. The upper registers list individual food items. The lower registers depict servants and assortments of offerings. The small deep holes above and in the vessels in the lowest registers probably depict fruits.

Fragments. Painted limestone. These are in overstorage and are not on public display. Both bottom fragments bear the inscription "The vizier, Bakenrenef, the justified." The fragment at left also appears to contain the remnants of a prayer featuring the canid god Wepwawet.

Fragment with graffiti. Painted limestone. Note the excellent preservation of the pigments. The glyphs at left spell Bakenrenef's name. He is shown seated at right. On his ankle is a graffito containing the name "Jeff Parker." On his stomach is another another name (difficult to read), with the date "1837."

Section with Anubis. Painted limestone. Excellent preservation of pigments. Anubis is shown in recumbent pose upon the "divine booth." The glyphs above the god contain his common epithets: "Dweller in the wt, he who is upon his mountain, lord of the Sacred Land, he who is before the divine booth."

[url]Offering formula for burial[/url] (archival photo). Painted limestone. The inscription says: "An offering which the king gives and which Anubis [gives], lord of the Sacred Land; [his] burial in the necropolis, the overseer and vizier, Bakenrenef."

The last to excavate Bakenrenef's tomb was an Italian team, which posted digital recreations of the tomb on its website. The recreations reveal how beautiful the vizier's tomb must have been when it was new. Click here, here, and here to see the digital recreations.

Other Inscriptions

This last handful of photographs shows other inscribed artifacts in the collection. Some of them come from larger objects such as false doors or tomb walls.

Old Kingdom, offering chapel of Netjeruser. Painted limestone. At the top of the wall at left are many registers listing individual food items. Below are processions of servants and depictions of offerings.

[url]Old Kingdom,[/url] offering chapel of Netjeruser. Limestone. A typical offering list but carved with particular, skillful detail. Across the top the list says: "Bread, cakes, beer, alabaster, and linen." Across the bottom: "A thousand of cattle, a thousand of gazelles, a thousand of geese."

Old Kingdom, door roll. Limestone. From the false door of Iti. Door rolls were common features of false doors and were at the top of the central portal or opening, as indicated in [url]this[/url] photo. In the masonry they represent the reed mat that would be unrolled to cover the entrance to a home. Many, like Iti's, were inscribed. [url]Archival photo.[/url] The inscription says: "King's acquaintance, overseer of ka-priests, Iti." This means Iti was the supervisor of priests tasked with rituals undertaken in the necropolis, particularly within the tombs of the elite. [url]Archival photo:[/url] Iti's door roll together with a second, belonging to another overseer of ka-priests named Rediny (top).

[url]New Kingdom[/url] (archival photo), wall fragment from the tomb of Nakht. Limestone. The kneeling figure at center-front is burning incense before an offering table; behind him stand two men pouring libations that extend beyond the left edge of the fragment, where Nakht was probably depicted.

Ptolemaic-Roman Period, ostraca. Limestone. Each contains writing in demotic script. Behind the ostraca is a schoolchild's writing board from the Christian Period, which contains a lesson written in Coptic.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beautiful stuff, as ever... Razz
The head you showed before (probably from Nakthmin)...
That's just dazzling. So beautiful.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Applause Great pieces, Kmt_sesh! I especially like this one of the New Kingdom family. Very Happy Do you know where the piece was discovered? Have you ever translated the text at the bottom?
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Segereh wrote:
Beautiful stuff, as ever... Razz
The head you showed before (probably from Nakthmin)...
That's just dazzling. So beautiful.


Thanks, Segereh. That "Nakhtmin" is also my favorite and the photo doesn't really do it justice. It's beautifully carved.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
Applause Great pieces, Kmt_sesh! I especially like this one of the New Kingdom family. Very Happy Do you know where the piece was discovered? Have you ever translated the text at the bottom?


The origin of this stela is not confirmed but is believed to be Abydos. I don't know the reason behind that, but I think it's kind of a generic answer among scholars who translate and study stelae. LOL If something on the stela doesn't clearly hint at another place of origin, Abydos is always a good bet (countless stelae were left there through the dynastic period).

The translation is a pretty basic offering formula. It says: "An offering which the king gives to Osiris, foremost of the Westerners, lord of Abydos; that he may give a voice offering of bread and beer, cattle and fowl, and everything good and pure on which a god lives, to the soul of the lady of the house [Tefket], deceased. It is her daughter who makes her name live: Tahuy."

This was actually the first stela at the Field Museum I ever translated. I found it in my old sketch book of translations. Smile I should also point out to those of you who have read the installment on stelae by the time I am writing this, that I was careless and reversed the names of the parents on this stela. Tefket is the wife and Humach is the husband. Damn, that's embarrassing. But thanks, Daughter_Of_SETI, for asking for the translation, because I would've missed my blunder otherwise. I am going to edit it in the above installment so that the information is correct.

Further, in looking through my old notes I also found a bit more information on this stela, from the Ptolemaic-Roman Period. It bothers me that even though it's on public display, the owner of the monument is not provided. In a translation from 1936 the owner of this stela is called "Inaros." Based on the hieroglyphs I would suggest a more accurate rendering of "Inirar" or "Ini-irar"--in either case an unusual name. He was the son of a man named Pedimin. This stela comes from Akhmim.
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