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Field Museum Collection
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a98/kmt_sesh/FIELD%20MUSEUM/IMG_0366.jpg

What a great piece . What a shame you don't have the top of it

And thankyou for the pic of the sphinx
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2008 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know if any more of that particular section of wall is in the museum's collection. There are similarly sized blocks displayed on either side of the one in my photo, but they're from the same level of wall. If we have anything from higher up on that wall, I don't know about it.

Nevertheless, that small square shows how much of Bakenrenef's tomb decoration was carried out. I believe it's a cliff-cut tomb (I've never seen photos of the tomb itself) and the craftsmen attached decorated sections of limestone to the natural walls, similar to how sections of KV5 were decorated back in Dynasty 19.

Ultimately that was to the detriment of the tomb. The small, decorated sections were easy to pry loose from the natural rock walls, which is why parts of Bakenrenef's tomb ended up in many different museums (and probably numerous European private collections of the nineteenth century).
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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MISCELLANEOUS GALLERY FEATURES

This will be my last large installment of photos. Here I wish to share miscellaneous scenes and features found within the Inside Ancient Egypt exhibition at the Field Museum.

Bastet Shrine & Animal Mummies

The exhibition includes a shrine devoted to the feline goddess Bastet. This shrine is a reproduction of an actual example excavated at the village of Deir el Medina, although for the purposes of the exhibit it is set up to resemble a shrine that might have been prepared for Bastet. Review the "Deities" section of the Statuary installment of photos on this page to see some of the various statues on display within the shrine.

Bastet shrine. A typical small, village shrine for the veneration of a deity, and for village elders and leaders to meet for council or judicial purposes.

Adjacent to the shrine is a small alcove in which are displayed mummified animals. All of the samples on display date to the Late Period and Ptolemaic Period, when animal sacrifices and mummification were a lively part of the Egyptian economy.

Falcon. For the god Horus, patron of kings. This was the most commonly mummified animal. The head has been unwrapped to reveal the exceptional state of preservation.

Cat. Another animal commonly mummified, particularly for Bastet. Note the painted facial features and painted linen ears. This mummy contains only a cat's head; the rest is stuffing.

Bovid. Possibly a young gazelle or ibex. Deteriorating condition. This animal is not on public display.

Bovid. Possibly a young gazelle or ibex. This animal is not on public display. A digital X-ray of the same specimen.

Royal Boat

One of the prizes of the collection is the royal funerary boat of King Senusrest III Khakaure, one of the most powerful and influential rulers of the Middle Kingdom. Senusret III reigned during Dynasty 12 and reorganized the administration and vizier system, as well as conducting numerous military campaigns deep into Nubia. This is one of six funerary boats found buried outside the enclosure wall of his pyramid complex at Dashur. It is made of cedar or spruce imported from ancient Lebanon and the planking is held together by tenon joints.

Many scholars now believe Senusret III was not buried at Dashur but at Abydos, in a massive subterranean tomb (the first hidden royal tomb in Egypt). More information on that tomb can be found in this discussion. The funerary boat in the following photos also possesses a modern distinction: it was the first artifact in the world to undergo C14 dating, a process discovered and developed at the University of Chicago, in the 1950s. Senusret III's boat is about 3,850 years old.

Funerary boat. View of the bow. As displayed today, inside a large, specially designed display case. A ramp encircles the boat so that visitors can have an elevated view of it.

[url]Archival photo[/url] of the entire boat. This was taken in the late 1980s before the current iteration of the exhibit opened. [url]Archival photo[/url] looking toward the bow, showing the remains of decking. [url]Archival photo[/url] looking toward the stern, showing the large steering rudder. [url]Archival photo[/url] of the boat as displayed in the old Field Columbian Museum, circa 1894.

Niankhkhnum & Khnumhotep

Roughly half of the Field's Egyptian exhibit is set up to resemble a marketplace as might be found in the capital of Memphis in Dynasty 5 (2471-2355 BCE). This part of the exhibit is based on a wall scene found in the well-known Dynasty 5 tomb of two men named Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep. Their tomb can be found on this map and is identified as "o" (at the bottom of the map). It lies to the east of the pyramid of King Unis. When Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep lived, about 70 years before the time of Unis, the king was probably Niuserre (2432-2421 BCE). Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep's shared tomb was either crumbled already by the time of Unis or, more likely, was leveled by Unis, because in the construction of his pyramid complex Unis ran his causeway straight over the top of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep's tomb.

Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep's tomb is a small twin-mastaba. It has been fully restored by the Egyptian SCA, as seen in this photo; it is a popular tourist stop in the Saqqara necropolis. More information on the tomb and these two men can be found on the websites TourEgypt and Osiris.net. The tomb was crafted of the highest quality, as the remains of the decoration plan demonstrate in such scenes as this man birthing a calf, the remains of this false door, the procession of ka-priests seen here, and the elaborately decorated entrance. An examination of the door-roll at the entrance shows the names of the two men written in hieroglyphs in such a way that they are joined together.

The replica wall scene around which the marketplace portion of the exhibit was built can be seen in this [url]archival photo.[/url] The depiction of this marketplace seen inside the actual tomb can be found in the first chamber, on the north wall. Much of the pigment is now gone. The curators of the exhibit decided to use colors more akin to depictions of people in the New Kingdom, when the replica of the wall was painted. Surviving pigments in these two men's tomb reveal the more standard Old Kingdom reddish-brown hues for men and creamy yellows for women.

Like many courtesans of the Old Kingdom, Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep held numerous titles, both priestly and secular. Their tomb is often referred to as "the tomb of the two hairdressers" because their most unusual title, which they shared, was "Overseer of the Manicurists of the Palace." They were Niuserre's personal groomers. It is probable that Niuserre himself paid for the construction of this twin-mastaba.

The photos that follow are closeups of some of the particular figures on the marketplace wall.

Manicurists. The topmost register is devoted to the craft of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep, although they are not shown. At far left a man carrying a satchel is having his legs massaged; to the right, a squatting man is having his head shaved. The dark-skinned man at far right is having his pubic hairs shaved. At center here a man is squatting and leaning back while his whiskers are being shaved. Behind the barber doing the shaving is a second barber squatting and holding a razor, similar to the bronze examples in this case. This man is a teacher whose apprentice stands behind him (the young dark-skinned man reaching forward, who is identified in the glyphs as "pupil").

Next over in the top register is this grouping. Note the brown-skinned man just left of center, who sits in an unusual frontal pose. He is receiving a manicure. The glyphs to the right of his head (beginning with the owl) tell us he is "overseer of the estate;" he is probably the steward of a large household. To the left of his head (beginning with the eye) are the glyphs providing the ancient Egyptian word for the manicurists: "workers of the nails." The naked young man at far left is identified as a servant (of the steward). The man to the right of the steward, with his hand to his chin, is identified as the scribe of the estate. At far right the dark-skinned man is receiving a pedicure.

Barter and trade. Most of the rest of the wall is concerned with transactions and shopping. At lower-left here a naked young woman is trading a vessel for some figs. She is the nanny for the young child holding her hand; the child is asking, "Should I go home now?" Here, at top-left, a man eating onions is trading some of his onions for some bread or cakes. Behind him a potter is showing some of his handiwork to a prospective buyer. Below the potter, in the next register down, a man is selling vetch or another type of fruit, from a large basket.

The far right ends in both of these registers show interesting details. In the upper register a woman is shown as the owner of a tavern, and is serving beer to a man who is eating an onion. Directly below is an older, overweight man sitting on a chair; he is the only figure on the entire wall given a chair on which to sit, indicating his superior status. He is inspecting a large bolt of linen.

Policemen. Of a humorous nature is the depiction of two policemen patrolling the marketplace and not performing their jobs very well. Both policemen have their guard animals--baboons. In this scene the policeman stands idly by as his baboon steals onions from a vendor, who is extremely upset. The vendor says: "Hey, youth, you who plays at being an overseer! Do you want me to get my supervisor?" This scene, on the opposite end of the wall, shows another policeman and baboon next to the nanny and child mentioned above. This policeman is arresting a boy for shoplifting, but the boy is completely nude and has nowhere to hide anything.

Activities

The exhibition features a number of activities for kids and families. Some of these are conducted by the museum's teen interns, particularly in the summer months, while others are permanent features of the exhibit.

Pull the stone. Visitors can try to pull a limestone block weighing about 6,000 pounds, roughly the size of one stone from the Great Pyramid. Attached to the stone block is a plaque (to which the woman in the photo is pointing) displaying a line drawing from a relief found in a Middle Kingdom tomb, which shows around 172 men pulling a statue that is 22-feet tall.

Senet. An oversized Senet gameboard that visitors can play. The plaques on the wall provide the rules and ideas for strategy. The boy at left is holding the four throw-sticks and is about to roll them for his next move.

Egyptian bed. A boy tries out the model of the sort of bed on which wealthy Egyptians slept. It is formed of wood and leather straps, and with a wooden headrest, as the actual beds were made. This is a model of the Early Dynastic Period adult bed displayed in an adjacent case.

Shaduff. A model of the type of water-retrieval device brought to Egypt by the Canaanites around 3,600 years ago. Visitors can lift water into a bucket from a pool below the device, and pour it into a trough. Shaduffs were used principally to water gardens and orchards.

Your name in glyphs. A teen intern forms the name Paul in magnetic, oversized glyphs. The operator of this activity can also use rubber stamps to stamp out characters onto sheets of paper on which there are pre-printed, empty cartouches.

Mummy making. A docent working with teen interns runs the "mummy making" activity. A plush doll was especially designed for "embalming" so visitors can learn how mummification was performed. Between the feet of the doll are the Canopic jar for the storage of his organs, which are removed from a slit on his left side.

************************************************************************

This concludes my final large installment of photographs of the Field Museum's Egyptian collection and galleries. Thanks for viewing them, and as always, questions are welcomed. I may yet contribute individual photos later.

As a reminder, in all cases I have clearly marked as "archival" those photos which I plumbed from the database of the museum. These photos are the intellectual property of the Field Museum and are not for public or private use without written authorization from the museum. However, all other photos of artifacts are mine, and you are free to copy them to use on your websites, or simply to enjoy. Smile
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Last edited by kmt_sesh on Sat Sep 26, 2009 9:55 pm; edited 1 time in total
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Last photos Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad

Could you post the photos that were deleted from this thread?

http://forum.egyptiandreams.co.uk/viewtopic.php?t=2041
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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for taking those beautiful photos of the Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep scene, Kmt_sesh! love10 It's a shame that they chose to recreate the scene in New Kingdom colours (the background colour stands out as especially an odd colour to pick for a traditional Old Kingdom scene Confused ), but otherwise it's a fantastic remake of the original scene...not that I've been fortunate enough to see the original scene in person myself. Sad

conorp wrote:
Could you post the photos that were deleted from this thread?

I don't know if Kmt_sesh kept his photos of that coffin (it was particularly ugly and "fake-looking"), but if not, there's a shot of it on this YouTube video (about two minutes, forty-seven seconds into the clip); it's in the background of the shot on the left-hand side. I know you can't see it in much detail, but that's the best I could find.
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
know you can't see it in much detail, but that's the best I could find.


Thanks for trying.
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 3:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

conorp wrote:
Quote:
Last photos Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad

Could you post the photos that were deleted from this thread?


LOL It had to come to an end some time. On the plus side my Photobucket photos are much better organized now, and people can see them here in this thread.

As for that other coffin, Daughter_Of_SETI is correct. I no longer have the photos of it on my computer. They would be on a back-up disk somewhere in my clutter. The thing was seriously ugly and not worth taking up space in my Photobucket account. We were all glad to see it leave the gallery once the Tut exhibition left Chicago. You can't really see it well in that YouTube video Daughter_Of_SETI found but it's really not worth seeing, anyway. I have no plans to put it back in my Photobucket account and it doesn't belong in this thread because the coffin isn't even in the museum anymore. LOL Most likely it's back in its glass case in John Rowe's office. Seriously, in profile this unfortunate coffin looks like Dick Tracy. Many of us still think it's a fake.

Daughter_Of_SETI wrote:
Quote:
It's a shame that they chose to recreate the scene in New Kingdom colours (the background colour stands out as especially an odd colour to pick for a traditional Old Kingdom scene Confused ), but otherwise it's a fantastic remake of the original scene...


I'm still not sure why the curators decided to paint it that way, but personally it makes no difference to me. It's still great fun to see and I continue to end many of my tours with that wall scene. The visitors seem to enjoy it. I still tell them the funny twist you gave me about the two policemen and how Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep may not have liked them. It goes over well. The pages on this tomb at Osiris.net do not identify these two men as policemen (just as a couple of guys with baboons), but it's more than likely true that that was their profession.

You can see the original especially well on this page at Osiris.net, in that line drawing under "The First Chamber" about midway down the page and right below the "North Wall" header (and as I'm writing this I'm thinking you may be the person who showed me this in the first place Anxious ). It doesn't give you any sense of color but you get a good idea of the condition in which the relief was found.
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conorp
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 3:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

First off just a question (Not really important): How many photos have you taken of the field museum?

Also, What is the oldest Egyptian object you have in the field.


Finally,

Thanks for the pictures.
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
First off just a question (Not really important): How many photos have you taken of the field museum?


Oh, man, I honestly have no idea. I've been going to the museum for nearly a decade now and I can't even begin to imagine how many photos I've taken there--in the Egyptian exhibit alone, even. Thousands, easily. Many I've discarded along the way, others I've used for training materials when I'm working with new docents, but most are just for my own enjoyment.

Quote:
Also, What is the oldest Egyptian object you have in the field.


That's another tough one to answer. You have me curious to find out but I doubt I'd be able to pin it down to one, single artifact. It would definitely be something from one of our cases featuring prehistoric artifacts, like this case, and most likely it is either a ceramic pot or one of the flint tools.

Quote:
Finally,

Thanks for the pictures.


You're very welcome. Smile Please feel free to ask other questions, if you have any. That's one of the most important reasons for the existence of this particular thread.
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
This concludes my final large installment of photographs of the Field Museum's Egyptian collection and galleries.

Dito from conorp: Sad
Great collection! And many thanks for sharing!

kmt_sesh wrote:
As a reminder, in all cases I have clearly marked as "archival" those photos which I plumbed from the database of the museum. These photos are the intellectual property of the Field Museum and are not for public or private use without written authorization from the museum. However, all other photos of artifacts are mine, and you are free to copy them to use on your websites, or simply to enjoy.

I'll make sure to remember that. Razz
Once again: many thanks for a great thread.
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great pictures. And great thread in general. Love the descriptions you gave as well.
I'm thinking in turning this into a "sticky" post? That way it will stay on the front page. It's such a nice resource Very Happy
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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2008 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks very much for your kind words, Segereh and anneke. I appreciate your input and interest. Smile

Quote:
I'm thinking in turning this into a "sticky" post? That way it will stay on the front page. It's such a nice resource Very Happy


That's a terrific idea, anneke. I hadn't thought of that. Please go ahead and do so. Wink

Yesterday conorp asked about the oldest object in the collection, and that query interested me so I looked into it while I was at the Field today. As I suspected, I can't nail it down to a specific artifact. However, on display in the predynastic cases are numerous flint arrowheads and tools dating to the Fayum A period, so that would be the answer. Fayum A begins in about 5,500 BCE, so these flint artifacts are as old as 7,500 years.
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you very musch for your guide line.
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Please note that due to copyright concerns, I have removed all archival images from this thread. I posted a Moderator's message at the start of the original post. Some other docents expressed a concern about the archival images I had used, and they were correct in bringing my attention to it. Originally I wasn't aware of the strict policies regarding copyrighted images from the museum's database, so I agree it is best to remove these images. All other photos are my own. My apologies for any inconvenience this might pose for those who wish to peruse this thread, but it's my own fault. I should've known better.

As atonement I shall dine on nothing but stale bread and tepid water for a period of 30 days, and shall offer myself for mummification and display at the Field Museum when the time comes. But only when the time comes. Razz
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 06, 2009 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kmt_sesh wrote:
As atonement I shall dine on nothing but stale bread and tepid water for a period of 30 days, and shall offer myself for mummification and display at the Field Museum when the time comes. But only when the time comes. Razz

If you'd leave the water aside, you'd save the mummifiers quite a bit of work, mate...
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