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Thutmose's Cat Sarcophagus
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Seshat
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 2:30 am    Post subject: Thutmose's Cat Sarcophagus Reply with quote

I can't seem to find a nice picture of Prince Thutmose's cat sarcophagus. You know, the one belonging to a cat called Ta Miwt, who was apparently the pet of Akhenaten's brother?
I've seen pics before, but they're usually of one side of it and fairly low res. Anyone have any high res pictures of it that they'd like to share?
Also, I do remember that it was displayed for a while in the Cairo museum, but it has never been there when I've been there. Anyone seen it in person?

I'm rather fond of this kitty sarcophagus.
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conorp
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found a site on it Smile

http://www.mafdet.org/tA-Miaut.html

it is the whole page


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Photos And Information about Egyptian objects in Australia

Pompeii news and photos
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Daughter_Of_SETI
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent site, Conorp! Applause Thanks for sharing. pharaohthumb
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Amun
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

interesting site! Smile
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Gerard.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I saw it at the Pharaon exhibition in Paris. I believe there is a description in the book from Jaromir Malek The cat in ancient Egypt.
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kat
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seshat wrote:

Quote:
Also, I do remember that it was displayed for a while in the Cairo museum


It's still in the Cairo Museum, in the newly-refurbished Animal Mummy Room.
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Anchesenamon
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2008 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nice site Smile anyone got some more links with info about him?
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2008 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually that's pretty much all the info I've ever seen about that cat. I believe it's a her. The cat's name was..."Cat." Laughing

That's an excellent web page conorp found.
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Kiya
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2008 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes indeed! Thanks for sharing it Smile
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DaveB
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2008 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote


They translate this as:
(For) I am Ta-Miaut, the Triumphant.

Wouldn't it be more accurate to say:
(For) I am Ta-Miaut, the justified?

Or even the revered justified one?

Idea
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2008 3:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DaveB wrote:
Wouldn't it be more accurate to say:
(For) I am Ta-Miaut, the justified?
Or even the revered justified one?

You can hardly state the text mentions "mAa xrw".
Why would it be more correct if I may ask?
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2008 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Segereh wrote:
DaveB wrote:
Wouldn't it be more accurate to say:
(For) I am Ta-Miaut, the justified?
Or even the revered justified one?

You can hardly state the text mentions "mAa xrw".
Why would it be more correct if I may ask?

I'm blind. Or getting there. Scratch my remark if you will. Rolling Eyes
Good point: I don't see a specific reason for "triumphant" either.
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kat
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know the woman who did the translation. For what it's worth, John Baines of Oxford said she had a nice touch in translating hieroglyphs. There are other nuances at play that make 'triumphant' a better word choice in that particular instance.

For the record, the translator is Katherine Griffis-Greenberg, and she's just shy of her PhD in Egyptology from Oxford.
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 12:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd agree with kat. "Triumphant" is an unusual translation but that's only because most of us are so used to "the justified" or "true of voice," which is the literal translation of mAa xrw. Come to think of it, "triumphant" is no more unusual than "justified," and yet I'd bet that the ancient Egyptians would've agreed with all three of these translations. "Triumphant" is a rather poetic translation, I think. Smile
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neseret
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 12:01 pm    Post subject: Crown Prince Thutmose's tA-miau.t: translations of /mAa xrw/ Reply with quote

The moderator wrote:

Quote:
"I'd agree with kat. "Triumphant" is an unusual translation but that's only because most of us are so used to "the justified" or "true of voice," which is the literal translation of mAa xrw. Come to think of it, "triumphant" is no more unusual than "justified," and yet I'd bet that the ancient Egyptians would've agreed with all three of these translations. "Triumphant" is a rather poetic translation, I think.


Not really: consider what occurs when one (in death) becomes /mAa xrw/ - you are adjudged for your actions upon earth. If you have been unfair in life, you are adjudged worthy of destruction. But if you are found fair in this court battle before the 42 assessors of your life, you are allowed to continue in the afterlife, where you will exist for eternity. As such, you are triumphant in your case.

The Woerterbuch, II: 15-18 tells us there are 3 meanings to /mAa xrw/:

a) "justified" [gerechtfertigt]
b) "blessed/beatified [Selig]
c) "triumphant" [Triumpherien]

a) and c) can refer to the living as well as the dead - for one is "justified" in court cases, in disputes, etc. One can "triumph" over one's enemies, such as the King, or again, a person in a dispute of some sort, such as a court case.

Obviously b) is a term used more for the dead and for the divine, but again, can be used among the living, such a when a person is venerated in life, such as Amenhotep, Son of Hapu, among others, who was held in veneration during his life and made a deity after death.

So, one caannot say for a fact that any one meaning is the only meaning to /mAa xrw/. It's not used only for the dead (despite many popular books which state this). Wink

Reference:

Woerterbuch = Erman, A. and H. Grapow 1926. Wörterbuch der Aegyptischen Sprache. (7 Vols.). Leipzig: J. C. Hinrich.

For more information on the use of the phrase/mAa xrw/ in instances than other for the dead, please see:

Derchain, P. 1977. Geburt und Tod eines Gottes. GM 24: 33-34.

Gessler-Löhr, B. 1990. Zur Schreibung von mAa-xrw mit der Blume. GM 116: 25-43.

Gillam, R. A. 1979. An instance of the title imy-r Swt nSmt on a statuette in a private collection. GM 36: 15-28. [Concerning a fragment of a statuette named as Horus /mAa xrw/. The statuette belongs into the Middle Kingdom and probably comes from Saqqara, where this deity was admired in the New Kingdom with other deities.]

Graefe, E. 1977. Horus-der-Gerechte, Miysis, der Doppellöwe und Horus-Triumphator im 10. oäg. Gau. GM 23: 37-43. (Further study on the above deity.)

Murnane, W. J. 1977. Ancient Egyptian Coregencies. Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization [SAOC] 40. Chicago: Oriental Institute.

Obsomer, C. 1995. Sésostris Ier. Étude chronologique et historique du règne. Étude 5. Brussels: Connaissance de l'Égypte Ancienne. [Appendix 3 is a reconsideration of the significance of the epithets /mAa-xrw/ and /di anx/ after the royal name.]

Smith, H. S. 1976. The Fortress of Buhen. The Inscriptions. With Assistance from † W. B. Emery, B. J. Kemp, G. T. Martin and D. B. O'Connor. Forty-eighth Excavation Memoir = Excavations at Buhen, vol. II. London: Egypt Exploration Society. [Excursuses list and discuss the titles /wHm anx/, /mAa xrw/ and /nb imAx/, the writing of the name Buhen, the cults of the deified Senwosret I and Senwosret III.]

Zecchi, M. 1997. Il titolo sacerdotale "grande combattente - signore del trionfo" di Pharbaithos. Studi di Egittologia e di Antichità Puniche, Pisa [SEAP] 16: 25-45. [Examines all the known instances of the expression /aHA wr nb mAa xrw/ "great warrior - lord of triumph", which, according to Yoyotte, was a title borne by the priests of Hormerty at Pharbaithos.]

HTH.

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