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Fictional Books based in Egypt
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child_of_Set0409
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 13, 2009 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MAKE SURE YOU READ MICHELLE MORAN'S!!!!!! They're Nefertiti, The Heretic Queen, and Cleopatra's Daughter. They're incredible!
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Neferneferuaten Nefertiti
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 10:10 pm    Post subject: Love Poem in old 70s romance Reply with quote

This is driving me nuts... I am trying to find the book that contained a poem that started with this line:

"I am unto thee a garden
Filled with all manner..."

And then I forget the rest. It was an Egyptian romance as that is what I was reading then. But for the life of me I am at a loss to remember who the author was or what the title was.
If I can remember the poet was a woman and she was telling her lover in a secret way that she was pregnant as they were not to be together... I can't remember if she was a princess and he a commoner, yada yada.
If anyone out there can help me I would be very thankful!
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Styler78
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am on my second book by Nick Drake, mentioned before by Bennubird (i read them in reverse, but it does not make any difference). I personally like his Tutankhamun book, the second in the series based around Rahotep- the medjay police official and his work.

This thread has given me lots of new ideas now...............

Very Happy
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jimirayyng
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2012 9:22 pm    Post subject: Bram Stoker - The jewel of the seven stars Reply with quote

Bram Stoker - The jewel of the seven stars, the story line flits between Edwardian London and AE. This short book is in my humble opinion far more evocative of both eras than any of the countless films it has inspired.
It can be read here unabridged.. enjoy

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3781/3781-h/3781-h.htm
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Naunacht
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2012 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't believe that with all the Armana fanatics here no one mention Allen Drury's A God Against the Gods and Return to Thebes.

His portrayal of Akhenaton and his court is remarkable. It was actually a best seller in its day (1976)

He was a political novelist first and foremost and it shows in these stories. Strong characterizations, good plot line and for what it's worth his story probably holds up in the face of recent research fairly well.

They're out of print now but if you can get your hands on a used copy it's worth reading.
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Sothis
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Naunacht for that one (or better two).
It is certainly not wrong to try one`s local library first.
I found at least one title at mine Smile
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2012 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sothis wrote:
Thanks Naunacht for that one (or better two).
It is certainly not wrong to try one`s local library first.
I found at least one title at mine Smile


As a librarian I can't believe I didn't say that myself.
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neseret
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There used to be a series of romance novels set in ancient Egypt, back in the late 1970's - early 1980's by an author named Joyce Verrette.

What made her novels interesting is that she concentrated on the life and reign of Amenemhat I, the first king of the 12th Dynasty, and his wife Nefrytatanen, who was the mother of Senwosret I. It's rare today to see any ancient Egyptian fictional account that doesn't emphasize the New Kingdom kings (usually the Amarna kings), or goes straight for the jugular and concentrates on the last Ptolemaic ruler, Cleopatra VII.

Verrette had an interesting take on the rule of Amenemhat I: she doesn't acknowledge that he (Amenemhat) was actually a vizier to Montuhotep III (or IV, she isn't clear), but he also appears to not have been a son, either ("they were like a mother and father to him..." in reference to his predecessor and his queen). She does make him out to be a great unifier of the Two Lands (that seems to be his main goal in all the novels), and implies his marriage to Nefrytatanen is actually an arranged marriage of a northern ruling house to his southern house.

The novels uses the actual Egyptian names for places (Anglicized), such as referring to Egypt as "Tamera," which is an Anglicized version of /tA-mry/, one of the internal names for the land of Egypt.

The southern kingdom capital is called Waset, the actual name for the nome and city of Thebes (/wAst/), while the northern capital is referred to as Pe, which is the Egyptian name of Buto (/P/) in the Delta. Together, this king and queen build Ithtawe, which was the actual capital of Amenemhat I at Lisht (/ITy-tawy), which has the meaning of "holder/unifier of the Two Lands."

Names of gods and other Egyptian items and people are referred to by their Anglicized Egyptian terms, such as a servant woman called "Baket", whose name mean (quelle surprise) "female servant." Rolling Eyes

The type of novel is in the genre of many of the early '80's (think basically in the Rosemary Rogers tradition, if you actually know what I mean here, with a lot of "slowly she turned" moments... #Crazy ). I would say these novels were mildly popular with the 20-40's age group at the time, though Verrette's never achieved the mad frenzy of fans as did Rogers.

Verrette appears to have had two different novels set in ancient Egypt, from my quick review of Bookfinder.com.

The first is Sunrise of Splendor (1978) is set against the Ramesside period, where the noble Sharula (later re-named Nefertiry) is given to King 'Ramessa' to be another one of his wives. Refusing to be content as just another woman in the harem, Nefertiry eventually has herself elevated to queen. Her absolute loyalty to Ramessa earns her many enemies at court, among the priests of Amon-Ra and within her new "family". I never read this book, let me note, so I am just giving the summary from one of the book descriptions.

The second set is the Amenemhat/Nefrytatanen series of novels, which I did read (I worked in a bookstore for about a year or so when I first finished college) beginning with Desert Fires (1978), which is then followed by Winged Priestess (1980), and the last one (as I recall) was Dawn of Desire (1982).

In looking over Amazon, I was amazed at the price differences. If you want a "new" (and I would guess this means remaining stock that never sold, as it has not been reprinted), you can lay out anywhere from $101.00 - $175.00 USD (remember these are paperback books of the usual size and quality!). If you can do with a "used" copy, you can pay as little as $.01 USD (a penny).

In all, a good set of reads if you can find them.

HTH.
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Sothis
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also a good read is the one suggested by naunacht, "A God against Gods".

First, when I opened the book, I inwardly groaned because I couldn`t believe that I was going to read yet another fiction book on THAT time period.

But a little into the book it has gripped me already, mainly because in each chapter the story is told through someone else`s eyes which makes it really interesting. Characters like Amenhotep son of Hapu, Gilukhepa, Aanen or the scribe Khaires (who for some reason is identified with Horemheb) all have their say, as do of course Amenhotep III, Tiye, Aye and Akhenaten himself.

The odd mistake here and there ( Hatshepsut is called Thutmose III`s half sister) can easily be forgiven.
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Naunacht
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2012 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Death Comes as the End by Agatha Christie.

Christie took the characters and personalities in the Hekahnakhte letters and turned them into a mystery story--her only attempt at historical fiction.

She got some technical help on the setting from hubby, archaeologist Max Mallowan, and his colleagues.
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Ikon
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2012 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a book by L. Rowley with title, Tutankhamun - Diaries of a Boy King. This is a humorous book similar in tone to Diaries of Adrian Mole. Easy reading and very funny at times. I found this as a Kindle download only. Published this year
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lpicker
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 12:07 am    Post subject: Books by Lester Picker Reply with quote

I do hope this is okay in this forum. If not please delete.

I am the author of a trilogy of books on the First Dynasty, receiving 5-star reviews on Amazon. You might want to check them out.

Thanks,

Les
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waenre
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 1:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

neseret wrote:
Meritamon wrote:
Nobody mentioned Elizabeth Peters yet? Shocked Her Egypt series is great.


Not everyone know that "Elizabeth Peters" is the nom de plume for Egyptologist Barbara Mertz, who also writes under the name of Barbara Michaels. Her Amelia Peabody series of mysteries sets in Egypt are very good, and well researched.

I have always enjoyed the mysteries of Lynda Robinson and her Lord Meren series, for the same reasons.

There were a series of "potboiler" romance novels (think Mills and Boone here, or Harlequin Romance) set in ancient Egypt back in the late 1970's-1980's (showing my age here!) by an author named Joyce Verrette. Three of them are quite different as they are set in the Middle Kingdom, while most ancient Egypt fiction novels are usually set in the New Kingdom and later.

These titles are still acquirable from Amazon and are as follows:

Dawn of Desire
Desert Fires
Winged Priestess

These 3 novels follow the relationship of King Amenemhat I and his wife, Nefrytatenen, who was mother of Senwosret I.

Verrette also wrote one novel set about the time of Ramses II:

Sunrise of Splendor

As fiction goes, they're OK. The research references to ancient Egypt are spotty, and sometimes darned near unbelievable claims or associations are made. But for a Saturday afternoon with rain outside and nothing otherwise to do, these volumes can keep you occupied. Wink

HTH.


Neseret,

What do you think of Alan Drury's books about the Amarma period:

A God Against the Gods (1976)
Return to Thebes (1977)

They're old, and I read them when they first came out. Alhough I had been interested in ancient egypt since the fifth grade, these books brought the Amarna period to life for me, and made me a life-long fan of the Amarna period.

Evelyn Wells' book, Nefertiti, which I read while in high school was fascinating and got me interested in the period.

Re Drury's books, in the introduction of one of the books, I seem to recall that he stated that Horemheb was the son of Aye. Drury had deve;p[ed a complete family relationship. Kiya was a princess from Mitanni.

Thanks in advance.

waemre
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neseret
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2013 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

waenre wrote:
What do you think of Alan Drury's books about the Amarma period:

A God Against the Gods (1976)
Return to Thebes (1977)

They're old, and I read them when they first came out. Alhough I had been interested in ancient egypt since the fifth grade, these books brought the Amarna period to life for me, and made me a life-long fan of the Amarna period.

Evelyn Wells' book, Nefertiti, which I read while in high school was fascinating and got me interested in the period.

Re Drury's books, in the introduction of one of the books, I seem to recall that he stated that Horemheb was the son of Aye. Drury had deve;p[ed a complete family relationship. Kiya was a princess from Mitanni.


Drury's books gives an insight (fictional) into the home life of Akhentane and his family line, but his suppositions reflect mainly some of the prevalent Egyptological theory of the 1960's, such as the Kiya-as-foreign-princess theory (now pretty well rebutted, as 'Kiya' is a known "pet/diminutive" name in Egyptian).

I read the Drury novels many years ago, and now would consider them pretty short on fact, but otherwise well-written.
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Lavender
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PostPosted: Sat May 18, 2013 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, all! I have not been around the forums lately -- been too busy working away at my own next fictional Egypt book! But I wanted to tell you about a book I recently read and THOROUGHLY enjoyed: The Maya Papyrus by Richard Coady. I absolutely loved it. It's long -- it spans from the end of Thutmose IV's reign through the beginning of Horemheb's, but it still manages to be a page-turner. It's full of battles and intrigue, and the writing itself is fantastic. It is now my favorite Egyptian novel. Highly recommended!
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