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freeTinker
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:01 pm    Post subject: On-line Publications Reply with quote

I am sure many at this site are aware of the following, but if not or if you are new to the subject and looking to a cheap way to read, the following are all freely available as on-line publications.

ANCIENT EGYPT

The Pyramid Texts
Samuel A. B. Mercer , translator [ 1952 ].

Development of Religion and Thought in Ancient Egypt
by James Henry Breasted [1912 ].
Millennia of Egyptian religious evolution as seen through their literature, including extensive quotes from the Pyramid Texts.

The Egyptian Book of the Dead
E. A. Wallis Budge , translator [ 1895 ].
The best known Ancient Egyptian sacred text, which describes the journey into the afterlife.

The Egyptian Heaven and Hell
by E. A. Wallis Budge [1905 ]
A journey through the night side of the Ancient Egyptian cosmos.
Vol I: The Book of Am-Tuat
Vol II: The Book of Gates
Vol III: The Egyptian Heaven and Hell

The Liturgy of Funerary Offerings
by E. A. Wallis Budge [1909 ].
Also known as "The Book of the Opening of the Mouth", this book contains a large extract from the Pyramid Texts, the oldest known Ancient Egyptian sacred text.

The Demotic Magical Papyrus of London and Leiden
by F.Ll. Griffith and Herbert Thompson [1904 ]
A late Egyptian magical text originally written in Demotic.
Reprinted by Dover as 'The Leyden Papyrus.'

Legends of the Gods: The Egyptian Texts
by E. A. Wallis Budge [1912 ]
Translations of key Ancient Egyptian myths. Includes the De Iside et Osiride of Plutarch

The Burden of Isis
by James Teackle Dennis [1910 ]
A translation of a set of hymns to the goddess Isis.

The Wisdom of the Egyptians
by Brian Brown [1923 ]
Coverage of the history of Ancient Egyptian religion, with some important texts included:
the Ptah-Hotep and the Ke'gemini
the Wisdom of Hermes Trismegistus
the Story of the Book of Thoth

The Rosetta Stone
by E. A. Wallis Budge [1893 ,1905 ]
The famous monument which opened up the Ancient Egyptian writing system: with extensive background material and a full translation of the text.

The Hieroglyphics of Horapollo
translated by Alexander Turner Cory [1840 ]
An attempt in late antiquity to explain Egyptian Hieroglyphs as pure symbols (very unsuccessfully). Noted for its influence on later occultists.

Records of the Past
ed. by A. H. Sayce [1888 ]
Translations of mythological and historical texts from the Ancient Near East.

General

Tutankhamen: Amenism, Atenism and Egyptian Monotheism
by E. A. Wallis Budge [1923 ]

Egyptian Mythology and Egyptian Christianity
Samuel Sharpe [1863 ].

Egyptian Ideas of the Future Life
E. A. Wallis Budge [1900 ].

Egyptian Magic
E. A. Wallis Budge [1901 ]

Egyptian Myth and Legend
Donald A. Mackenzie [1907 ]

Ancient Egyptian Legends
Margaret Alice Murray [1920 ]
A taste of Ancient Egyptian mythology, by the trailblazing scholar Margaret Murray.

Legends of Babylonia and Egypt
by Leonard W. King

ANCIENT NEAR EAST

General


Myths and Legends of Babylonia and Assyria
by Donald A. Mackenzie [1915 ]
A massive survey of the religion, culture, and history of the ancient Near East.

The Religion Of Babylonia And Assyria
by Theophilus G. Pinches 159,537 bytes

Sumerian Mythology
by Samuel Noah Kramer [1944, 1961 ]

Texts

Records of the Past
Translations of mythological and historical texts from the Ancient Near East.

The Seven Tablets of Creation
by L.W. King [1902 ]
The Babylonian creation saga, one of the earliest written myths.

The Enuma Elish (The Epic of Creation)
translated by L. W. King [1902 ]
The Babylonian creation saga.

The Seven Evil Spirits
translated by R. C. Thompson [1903 ]

The Code of Hammurabi
translated by L.W. King [1915 ].
The earliest known legal code, considered the basis of many Near Eastern legal systems.

The Syrian Goddess
translated by Herbert A. Strong [1913 ]
Lucian of Samosata's account of Astarte worship in the late classical era, in what is now Turkey.

The Babylonian Legends of Creation
by E. A. Wallis Budge [1921 ]
The text of the Babylonian creation myth.

Gilgamesh

The Epic of Gilgamish
by R. Campbell Thompson [1928 ]
The first complete academic translation of Gilgamesh.

The Chaldean Account of the Deluge
by George Smith [1873 ]
A historic article in which the discovery of the Babylonian Deluge account was announced, an episode from the Gilgamesh myth.

Ishtar and Izdubar {Gilgamesh}
by Leonidas Le Cenci Hamilton . [ 1884 ]
An early translation of the Gilgamesh myth.

Adapa and the food of Life
Translated by R. W. Rogers [1912 ]
A fragment of the Gilgamesh saga.

Descent of the Goddess Ishtar into the Lower World
translated by M. Jastrow [1915 ]
A pivotal episode in the Gilgamesh saga involving the Goddess Ishtar.

The Babylonian Story of the Deluge and the Epic of Gilgamish.
by E. A. Wallis Budge [1929 ]
A short pamphlet which contains the 'Deluge' portion of the Gilgamesh epic and a summary of the rest of the text.

These and many more (ancient texts) can be found at http://www.sacred-texts.com. Thanx to John Bruno Hare, if you have copies of out-of-publication or copyright-free material that you would like published - and made freely available to all - on his site, you might want to look him up!
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2009 2:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thank you chillie, they look very interesting! Smile
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2009 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nicely done, freeTinker. I appreciate your taking the time and effort to assemble all of this. I can see myself using some of these links.

Would you mind if I turn this into a sticky? That way it will always be at the top of the Books forum so that other people may benefit from it for a long time to come. Wink
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes kmt_sesh, feel free to add, amend or sticky as you feel fit. It is sad actually, but my motivation in copy/pasting/linking was based on a trip I made to Barnes & Noble at the weekend. I was determined to add a serious book to my egypt stuff, I planned on taking neseret up on one of her recommends, then well...
    a) it wasn't in stock
    b) I saw the price on the computer screen - $500!!!
    c) I didn't order it, and left for the magazine rack with my tail between my legs Sad

The guy who produces all these old books online (from memory) has an old fashioned bookbindery business in Santa Cruz CA, my only hope is that over time, good folks like some of the folks here might make available to him some more up-to-date 'sacred-texts' and we can all share freely. Well, it's nice thought, but copyright and all that stuff, well... he has some good items on his site (all kinds of subject matter) and whilst the texts may not be the most up-to-date, or the best out there, they might serve as a reasonable introduction to the subject of this board for hacks like me - and best of all, they are free!
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree this is worth keeping on hand, and `sticky-ed´ it ...
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2009 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

anneke wrote:
I agree this is worth keeping on hand, and `sticky-ed´ it ...

And welcome back. You've been missed. Wink
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 4:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for taking care of that, anneke. It's been a hectic week and I meant to come back sooner but am checking in only now. I think freeTinker's efforts in assembling this are commendable, and I'm glad this will remain available for others to use.
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

freeTinker wrote:
Yes kmt_sesh, feel free to add, amend or sticky as you feel fit. It is sad actually, but my motivation in copy/pasting/linking was based on a trip I made to Barnes & Noble at the weekend. I was determined to add a serious book to my egypt stuff, I planned on taking neseret up on one of her recommends, then well...
    a) it wasn't in stock
    b) I saw the price on the computer screen - $500!!!
    c) I didn't order it, and left for the magazine rack with my tail between my legs Sad

The guy who produces all these old books online (from memory) has an old fashioned bookbindery business in Santa Cruz CA, my only hope is that over time, good folks like some of the folks here might make available to him some more up-to-date 'sacred-texts' and we can all share freely. Well, it's nice thought, but copyright and all that stuff, well... he has some good items on his site (all kinds of subject matter) and whilst the texts may not be the most up-to-date, or the best out there, they might serve as a reasonable introduction to the subject of this board for hacks like me - and best of all, they are free!


But, as serious works on Egyptology, they are totally worthless.

I can't emphasise enough that the reason these books are free is because they are out of copyright, pure and simple. As such, you can acquire them freely, but as to the information they offer for serious reading on Egyptology, just about all of them (and particularly the Budge works) are not worth considering as reliable works on ancient Egypt.

A few publications are theosophical works, and not serious historical research or linguistic translations. As such, they are biased towards a certain agenda, and are not considered Egyptological publications, such as Brown's work, which includes Hermetic literature, for example.

Yes, these books may be interesting from a historical viewpoint (how Egyptologists of the 19th and early 20th century viewed ancient Egypt, particularly from a Judaeo-Christian emphasis in their works), but most positions they espouse, and the translations they offer, have long been superseded since the 1960's and 1970's.

This is not to say you shouldn't read them, but rather you should read them with a critical viewpoint, as from the historical perspective of "this is how people used to think about ancient Egypt and the discipline of Egyptology."

Were it me, I would save my money (and reading efforts) to acquire far more recent works on ancient Egypt from far better scholars than the ones listed.

My .
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

neseret wrote:
...you should read them with a critical viewpoint, as from the historical perspective of "this is how people used to think about ancient Egypt and the discipline of Egyptology."


Today's Budge, tomorrow's Murnane perhaps...
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

freeTinker wrote:
neseret wrote:
...you should read them with a critical viewpoint, as from the historical perspective of "this is how people used to think about ancient Egypt and the discipline of Egyptology."


Today's Budge, tomorrow's Murnane perhaps...


Indeed: but isn't that the entire point? As new discoveries come along and better understanding of the ancient Egyptian culture evolves, as well as the language, what Murnane and others wrote about may indeed become outdated. I know that every Egyptologist today knows that his/her work is only as good as the next discovery, and they live with that.

This is why I said it's not all that bad to read the outdated works of Budge and so on rom a historical viewpoint, but you said you will looking for as "...serious book" for your Egyptian collection. I interpreted that as a reliable and current work in the field.

This is why I noted that I would spend my money and reading efforts on at least what was current and up to date now rather than waste my time on outdated information.
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

neseret wrote:
Indeed: but isn't that the entire point?

Yes it is; at least it is your point, it was not my point. My point was that...
Quote:
...they might serve as a reasonable introduction to the subject of this board for hacks like me - and best of all, they are free!


For my part, I would love to (and will when funds allow) purchase more serious or I should say, up-to-date materials, until that time please don't sit on-high like a certain Frenchie telling us peasants to eat cake! (joke). Your point is taken, and I am sure other newbies coming to these boards will understand it too.
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm glad the opposing views on Budge etc. were voiced above.
I tend to roll my eyes on Budge's work as well, but FreeTinker is right on his "introduction to the subject".
One has to trust other people's ability to think critically.
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

freeTinker wrote:
For my part, I would love to (and will when funds allow) purchase more serious or I should say, up-to-date materials, until that time please don't sit on-high like a certain Frenchie telling us peasants to eat cake! (joke). Your point is taken, and I am sure other newbies coming to these boards will understand it too.


I had no intention of "sit(tting) on high and telling (...) peasants to eat cake!" I think the comment, even jocularly, is uncalled for in this instance.

You made the comment you wanted "...serious book(s)..." on ancient Egypt: I commented that to me that implied you wanted reliable works on the subject. Am I wrong about this?

You also noted that these works you listed "...might serve as a reasonable introduction to the subject of this board for hacks like me - and best of all, they are free!"

Please then explain to me why is my telling you that the books to which you refer are not only unreliable, but not even good introductory works on the topic is somehow "sit(tting) on high and telling (...) peasants to eat cake!"?

Rather, IF you want good and reliable works on ancient Egypt, which are well-researched, up to date and contain the most recent and reliable information on the topic, then why is my saying that perhaps saving up funds (and efforts) to acquire such books is being high-handed?

Marie Antoinette told peasants to eat cake when they had no bread and were starving. To carry this analogy off, I would have said to you that the only works you should ever read are compendiums which cost over $2500 per set (i.e., Helck, W., E. Otto, et al., Eds. 1972 - 1992. Lexikon der Ägyptologie. 7 Vols. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.) Then the analogy works.

But I did not say this: I said more recent and well-researched and up to date works on the topic are better than wasting time with works which are outdated and unreliable. Not all Egyptology books which are so researched and reliable are incredibly expensive, after all. For example, on history of ancient Egypt, I would suggest (for the beginner)

Trigger, B. G., B. Kemp, et al. 1983. Ancient Egypt: A Social History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

(you can acquire this from Amazon for as little as $10.00 used, or $15.00 new)

Grimal, N. 1994. A History of Ancient Egypt. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell.

Here you can get a hardcover copy for as little as $6.00 up to $35.00 for a brand spanking new copy in paperback.

There's always a way to compare book prices of any title you wish by going to Bookfinder.com, which compares the title with literally hundreds of online bookshops. Note you can find foreign titles here as well. So, you can pick and choose your price, condition and even nearest location to you to acquire the book you want.

When I'm looking for a book, I also check out Half.com, and list my wants there. I've been able to acquire very good and normally expensive works for as little as $10.00 or less. E-Bay also often has books on ancient Egypt, as the Egypt Exploration Society and a few dedicated Egyptology booksellers can be found there selling books.

You could also look into dedicated Egyptology bookshops online, as sometimes introductory prices or used prices through such shops are quite reasonable. Most of these sites also have very good books sales sometimes 3 or more times per year, and recent titles can be discount up to 75%. These include:

Atleest (Leiden, The Netherlands)

Aris and Phillips (Warminster, UK)

Harrassowitz (Wiesbaden, Germany)

Oxbow Books (Oxford, UK)

Institut français d’archéologie orientale du Caire (IFAO) (Cairo, Egypt)

Cybele (Paris, France)

Philip von Zabern (Mainz, Germany)

Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis (Fribourg, Switzerland)

Peeters (Leuven, Belgium)

Eisenbrauns (U.S.)

Brill (Leiden, The Netherlands)

[url=mailto:pyebooks@tiac.net]Jonathan Pye Books[/url] (U.S.) (e-mail address to subscribe to quarterly newsletter/catalogue)

ANE and related to Egyptology:

Astrom Editions (Sweden)

Dove Booksellers (U.S.)

Archaeologia (U.S.)

So, to me, I can't understand why anyone would waste time reading certain works - even for free - if the information these books have is outdated and unreliable, but meanwhile other sources are out there, available to any reader, to get more recent, accurate and up to date publications, with a little searching.

One can better spend their time and funds on more recent works, and if you know how to look and how to shop, as most people who use the Internet tend to be, and if you do this successfuly, you will find these works are not so expensive that they are unobtainable.

To sit and say that these 'free' works are the only thing you can afford tells me that perhaps you are not clear about wanting "serious book(s)" on the subject of ancient Egypt.

Books, if they are any good at all, will usually cost you something: that's how the authors make a living, and how publishers stay in business. I think it's fooling one's self to happen upon a cache of outdated and out of copyright book titles are not ask the pertinent questions, such as, "Why are they in open public use? Could it be that they have been surpassed by more recent works? That their information is no longer valid? That they are, perhaps, biased and not objective works on the topic?"

All these question should be asked and investigated before spending your time and efforts in downloading and reading such works which will, in the end, only serve to confuse any reader who really wants to know something about ancient Egypt.

I cannot count how many times I've heard someone on an Internet discussion list argue that X or Z is the case because '...that's what Budge wrote...' - over 100 years ago. Surely it is reasonable to assume that Egyptian studies have advanced over 100 years, and as Budge wrote his last work at least 75 years ago, then his works are surely out of date.

For example, in formal Egyptology studies, if a student quotes Budge as the only resource for this or that contention, or even uses his translations of glyphs, more often than not his supervising professor will say that his contention is unproven and/or the translation unreliable, as Budge was notoriously wrong in about 75-80% of what he wrote, and never provided any support for what he wrote, either.

This is why you see such antipathy amongst Egyptologists towards Budge's works, but I always hear the argument that, "Well, if he's so wrong, why are his books still published?"

In shortest answer I can give is that Budge's works are still published because they are out of copyright and publishing houses such as Dover Publications in the US bought the remainder of his works for republishing over 40 years ago. In short, they can republish them at practically no costs (after all, there's no royalties to pay anyone any more) and make a passel of money from selling these books.

These books are cheap to buy, usually in paperback, but nowhere in the jacket notes of the book by the publisher do they note how inaccurate Budge was as to his facts, how biased many of his views were (Barto 1997), and that even when Budge wrote his works from the 1890's - 1930's, Egyptologists at the time ignored his publications as being inaccurate and outdated at the time (Forbes 1997: Dawson and Uphill1995).

Now, if you did not know this (and if you're not buying any of the referred works above, you would not know this), explain to me how anyone could trust "...people's ability to think critically" concerning Budge's works? The jacket notes go on about how prolific Budge's works were, but they do not tell you the other information about his unreliability, do they?

Reference:

Barto, W. M. 1997. Re's Kingdom in the Empire Where the Sun Never Set: The Nineteenth-Century British Egyptologists and Their Thoughts Concerning Race, Religion, and the Role of Women in Ancient Egypt. Ph. D. Dissertation (Unpublished). Madison:Drew University.

Dawson, W. R. and E. P. Uphill 1995. Who Was Who in Egyptology. M. L. Bierbrier. London: Egypt Exploration Society.

Forbes, D. 1997. Giants of Egyptology: E.A. Wallis Budge (1857-1943). KMT: A Modern Journal of Ancient Egypt, Vol. 8/2 (Summer 1997): 78-80.
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

neseret wrote:
...the books to which you refer are not only unreliable, but not even good introductory works on the topic


Then you must petition or request the moderator to remove the thread (or the sticky element), I do not intend to get my knickers-in-twist one way or the other; not to do so (with your knowledge) would be wrong and would be tantamount to allowing the introduction of dangerous unreliable material, if a mistake has been made I am sure the moderators will have no problem taking corrective action. I cannot comment, I do not have your wealth of knowledge on the subject, I have taken your point and I have expressed mine... that the works may serve (if only) as an introduction for newbies like me

Thank you for the couple of book references, I will add them to the boundary stelae book I purchased last night
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 18, 2009 5:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

neseret wrote:

Marie Antoinette told peasants to eat cake when they had no bread and were starving.


actually, marie antoinette never said any such thing. this is part of the mythology that was created against her to get her executed.

it was actually marie therese of spain, louis XIV's wife that said this.

sorry for poking my nose in.

and thank you for the information on the websites to price the books people want. i use amazon, but finding other sites will be good too.
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