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Amarna Prince?

 
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Who is depicted here?
Amenhotep III
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Akhenaten
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Tutankhamon
25%
 25%  [ 1 ]
Smenchkare
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
a queen
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
a princess
75%
 75%  [ 3 ]
Total Votes : 4

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Segereh
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 11:02 pm    Post subject: Amarna Prince? Reply with quote



Quote:
Plaster head of a youthful woman

Amarna, house P.47.2
Reign of Akhenaten,
1353 - 1336 B.C
Plaster;
h. 27.5 cm, w. 16.5 cm, d. 13 cm Agyptisches Museum und Papyrussammlung, Berlin

The more idealizing plaster heads from Thutmose's workshop represent members of the royal family and were probably models to be copied in stone. This head depicts an unidentified royal woman.


This might seem a rip-off of anneke's thread on Tiye's mummy, but I came across this picture rather by coincidence and started wondering who it's depicting. Not much is said on the site actually, except for the upper quote. When dragging over the picture it says "Osiris with the feature of Osiris". Okay... Now I happen to have this lovely book on the same exhibition the site is referring to: the Boston Museum's "Pharaohs of the sun" regarding pre-Amarna, Amarna and post-Amarna art and history. Now the book has this to say about it:

Quote:
Plaster head of a youthful woman

(same characteristics), Excavations of the Deutsche Orient-Gesellschaft, 1912-13

The extraordinary late-Amarna plaster heads from the workshop of Thutmose can be divided into two groups - one extremely realistic, the other more idealizing. (...) The head of the young woman* on the other hand conforms to the traditional ideal of beauty. Whereas the realistic group is confined to nonroyal persons, both male and female, the second group seems to be limited to members of the royal family. The young woman, therefore, is probably one of the princesses or one of Akhenaten's consorts. (Dietrich Wildung)

*Cyril Aldred, Akhenaten and Nefertiti, 1973 and
Dorothea Arnold, The royal women of Amarna, 1996.


Now, blame me for being sceptic, but couldn't this be a young boy? I wouldn't disagree the "being royal" but I wonder why it's described as being the head of a woman or a girl. Actually my first thought went to little Tut to be the depicted one. As far as we can tell from a "draft" statue, there seems to be no real indication of this one having to be a girl, no? I had these in mind when looking at the plaster:



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anneke
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 2004 1:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This plaster head is also mentioned in an article in Amarna Letters Vol.1.

In the caption there it claims that it's a young woman who is often identified as Kiya.

I think the chin and the delicate features do make it look like a woman. The earrings seem to be those worn by women as well.

Wonder if it reminds you of Tutankhamen because she may very well be his mother? Very Happy
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 2004 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hèhè, good point, but I was wondering if those really were earrings?
Never seen em like that before, certainly not in a draft.
I was thinking it was from the plaster not being complete?
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 2004 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

anneke wrote:
In the caption there it claims that it's a young woman who is often identified as Kiya.

That would surely be nice, but doesn't she seem a little young for that? After all, Thutmose's carvings most probably date only from the later part of the Amarna age, a reason why Nef's famous statue shows small aging wrinkles, running down alongside her lips. Kiya didn't last as long as Nef though. It's only a thought, probably easy to contradict. Smile

anneke wrote:
I think the chin and the delicate features do make it look like a woman. The earrings seem to be those worn by women as well.

You might make sense on the earring (pic), but still... on a draft?
I think androgenous looks suited Amarna artworks, no? Smile
After all, Kiya's canopic jars were used for a certain prince?
And if it's already difficult to separate Nef from Akh at times...
It looks soft and delicate indeed. But does that make it feminin?
I still think it could be a young boy depicted here.

anneke wrote:
Wonder if it reminds you of Tutankhamen because she may very well be his mother? Very Happy

Said this before, damn good point. Smile
Still, I think he or she looks young.
Thutmose's timeframe though...
I'm not sure.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 26, 2004 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think they really are earrings. I have seen pictures of these types of stud-earrings (I mean found at an excavation).

The timeframe is interesting. I didn't know that Thutmose's work was from the end of the Amarna period. It was a type of store room they found, so this could be an early image.

Who says btw that this is a draft? I have seen different theories about what these are: drafts, plaster casts of statues to serve as a reference, some are even thought to be plaster casts of humans.

The shape of the head is interesting. The top looks like it has room for a crown or otherwise a wig to be attached. The neck gives the impression it fit on a separately made body. (You know what I mean? The composite statues?)

It makes more sense if this was a somewhat important person. It looks like the head of some statue that could be on display. That leads me to think that it might actually be Meritaten or Ankhesenpaaten.
I usually think of Kiya's statues of having more of a rounded chin.
Tut is a possibility, but it just doesn't look like the statues of him as a youth. Again the chin just doesn't match.

Not to cloud the issue, but Kiya also had a daughter Laughing
I always thought that the chin on this one was too pointy to make it Kiya.

This is the problem with all the faces found in this atelier. It's very hard to figure out who they depict.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2004 3:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The images are a bit big to post, but check out the following page.

The first two linked images of that site show some of the amarna plaster heads of kings.


None of the men are depicted with earrings btw Cool
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Segereh
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2004 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's http://www.geocities.com/TimesSquare/Alley/4482/Amarnaheads.html. These are grown men though, even if the first is considered to be 'young'.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2004 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Still, I don't believe the statue that started this discussion depicts a man.

And even for a woman, she's young but looks to be at least in her late teens to me. In other words, it's not the image of a child. Children were usually depicted with much rounder faces. Still with their baby-fat present, so to say.
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Segereh
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 29, 2004 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a manga-fan, you knew.
Guys look like girls.
Women like boys. Smile
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