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Accurate information about Amarna Princesses?

 
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EgyptianRose
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 11:58 am    Post subject: Accurate information about Amarna Princesses? Reply with quote

I was wondering if these are accurate 'facts' about the Amarna Princesses Smile

Meritaten, Merytaten or Meryetaten

Royal Titles Great Royal Wife, Kings Daughter of His Body, His Beloved?

Birth Place Thebes?

Held the position of Great Royal Wife to Smenkhkare?

Evidence that she may have had a child with her father Akhenaten or even just married him?

That she could have possibly been the mother to Meritaten-Tasherit and Ankhesenpaaten-Tasherit?

Does anyone have the year of Birth?

Last known evidence of Meritaten?

Meketaten

Born fourth year of Akhenaten's reign?

Obviously not much is known about Meketaten, can someone please add more about Meketaten?

Neferneferuaten-Tasherit

Born between eighth - ninth year of Akhenaten's reign?

Born in Akhetaten?

Earliest depiction of her is in a fresco from the king’s house in Amarna?

Last known evidence of her survival?

Any interesting information about Neferneferure and Setepenre would be awesome and if you would like to add any other interesting information about any of the Amarna princesses please do... Thanks in advance Smile
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It is of course the hieght of irony that, after this intensive campaign to expunge them from the annals of Egypt, the Amarna pharaohs are today probably the most recognized of all the country's ancient rulers!

Quote 'Amarna Sunset' by Aidan Dodson.
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Meretseger
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Merytaten:

Royal Titles The full filiation was King's Daughter of His Body born of the Chief Wife Nefertiti. And - if we identify her with Neferneferuaten she was also 'Effective for Her Husband'.

Birth Place Almost certainly Thebes as she is first attested to in monuments there.

She was definitely the Great Wife of Smenkhkara

Evidence for either a marriage with, or having a child by him is hotly disputed. He is described in a letter of the Amarna Archive as 'Mistress of Pharaoh's House' suggesting she was performing the duties of a consort but possibly without the title of Great Wife.

Given said appearance on Amenhotep IV's Theban monuments she is presumed to have been born at latest in the first year of his reign.

As far as I know the last incontestable evidence of Merytaten is her appearance as Smenkhkara's queen. Everything after that is speculation.

Meketaten

Fourth year or earlier as she first appears on monuments at Akhetaten

Meketaten is known to have died during her father's lifetime (c. yr. 14) and to have been interred in the Royal Tomb at Amarna. She was long believed to have died in childbirth but her barely pubescent age makes that unlikely. The infant in the mourning reliefs has be explained as a child of Nefertititi or possibly as Meketaten herself symbolically reborn.



Neferneferuaten-Tasherit

8th-9th year seems about right and she was certainly born in Akhetaten. Not sure about her earliest appearance in art.

Some would identify her with the female Pharaoh Neferneferuaten but I believe her last attested appearance is in mourning reliefs for Meketaten.

Neferneferure and Setepenre

A palate belonging to the former was found in Tutankhamun's tomb and a fragment of jar inscribed as being from her tomb was found near the Royal Tomb. Setepenre is even more ephemeral. Possibly they died during their father's reign but if they did survive him they would certainly have lost their importance as members of the immediate royal family and so disappeared from record.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2012 1:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not sure the dates are as clear as that Meretseger.

The painting - is what was called the King's House - but may have been a throne room depicts the entire royal family (including Setepenre on Nefertiti's lap). This is the famous painting that includes Nefernefuaten and Neferneferure seated together on a pillow.

The Aten's early form of the name is used pointing to a date before year 12 and maybe even ca year 9.
That could actually push the birth dates of the girls back a bit.
By year 12 all 6 are depicted standing behind the throne in the Durbar scene. And I believe Neferneferure is holding a gazelle (not something a baby would do).

If the family depiction truly dates to year 9 (in the throne hall) then certainly Meketaten, Ankhesenpaaten and Neferneferuaten-Tasherit were born before year 6 (Meritaten we already new).
So it's not cleat to me how many of the princesses were born in Thebes. I would not be surprised if the first 3 (and maybe even the 4th) were born in Thebes.

Part of the problem is that we do not know at what age children started to be included in royal iconography. Did they immediately depict them, or wait until they reached a certain minimal age and were more likely to survive?
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2012 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lynda Green : Queens and princesses of the Amarna period - The social, political, religious and cultic role of the women of the royal family at the end of the eighteenth dynasty. - [Toronto, Univ., Diss., 1988]. - Ottawa, 1988. - ISBN : 0-315-46331-7. - 604, 50 p. :

Quote:
Although much discussed the royal women of the Amarna Period (from Tiye, queen of Amenhotep III, to Tiy, wife of Ay), have not yet been studied systematically. This thesis will attempt to rectify this matter through a thorough examination of elements of iconography and titulary. Both the details, such as crowns and wigs, and more general overviews of genres of scenes represented in art are examined, and are used in turn to determine the particular iconography of various queens and princesses. Similarly, the titles of the women of the royal family are studied both individually and in the longer groupings; the same format is maintained in summaries of titles associated with them. There are also sections which deal with the other inscriptional evidence for the role of the queens and princesses; this includes analysis of special problems connected with this evidence, such as the orthography of royal names. In addition, a special excursus discusses the difficulties associated with Tomb KV55, and the complicated evidence of its occupant and contents.

The latter portion of the thesis brings together the specific conclusions concerning individual elements and pieces to create a wider picture of the social, political, religious and cultic (priestly) roles of the royal women. The section on the social role of royal women studies their place in the court hierarchy and also encompasses their role in the succession. In the following section, an attempt is made to determine the actual political influence wielded by the royal women, especially in foreign affairs; in addition, several recent theories concerning the status of Nefertiti, Kiya and Merytaten are discussed. Examination of the religious role of the religious role of the queens examines the theological concepts underlying Amarna queenship, both in the traditional cults and in Akhenaten's religion. The cultic functions of the queens and princesses are treated separately, with an examination of their participation in the daily cult practices and their place in the Sed-Festival rites. There is a prosopographical section which includes both biographical sketches and discussions of additional specific problems which do not fit elsewhere in the dissertation. The thesis concludes with a historical overview of the developments and trends in queenship from the reign of Amenhotep III to that of Ay.

Available from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses.

Greetings, Lutz.
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Meretseger
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2012 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

anneke wrote:
Not sure the dates are as clear as that Meretseger.

Part of the problem is that we do not know at what age children started to be included in royal iconography. Did they immediately depict them, or wait until they reached a certain minimal age and were more likely to survive?


Amen, Anneke, Amen! Chronology is a b**ch Wink
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Ikon
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2012 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Meretseger"]
anneke wrote:
Not sure the dates are as clear as that Meretseger.

Part of the problem is that we do not know at what age children started to be included in royal iconography. Did they immediately depict them, or wait until they reached a certain minimal age and were more likely to survive?


Very good point. We know that in some European countries until only a few centuries back, that children below the age of eight were not seen as yet being "real" people, and if they died before that age were not given their own burial. They were buried, even without a name, with their mother or other female relative. Perhaps a mummy expert can shine a light on what is known of ages and if any very young mummies were named.
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