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anneke
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2004 9:00 pm    Post subject: IN THE NEWS Reply with quote

Did you notice the news iten on CNN about the reconstructed sarcophagus of Ramses VI?

The story also mentions some statues of Queen Tiye.
http://***.com/2004/WORLD/meast/03/21/egypt.ramses.ap/index.html


Quote:
Egypt unveils restored sarcophagus of Ramses VI

Monday, March 22, 2004 Posted: 7:43 AM EST (1243 GMT)

LUXOR, Egypt (AP) -- Egypt on Sunday unveiled the restored sarcophagus of Ramses VI, pieced together from 250 fragments and now on permanent display where it was first interred in the massive tomb of the ancient pharaoh, who ruled about 3,100 years ago.

Chip Vincent, director of the Egypt project at the American Research Center in Cairo, said 10 American, Canadian and Egyptian experts worked for two years on the reconstruction of the sarcophagus, carved in the shape of a mummy from a single block of green conglomerate.

"In the past, visitors to the tomb would only see the broken pieces of the sarcophagus," Vincent said. "Now they have the experience to see the head and the face of the pharaoh."

The restored lid shows a face with wide-set eyes and full lips, and the crossed hands hold royal scepters. Much of the lid is missing, however, and some fragments on the sides are supported with steel rods.

The original face is on display at the British Museum, and Zahi Hawass, head of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, said he hoped it would be returned to complete the sarcophagus.

Vincent said 90 percent of the stones belonging to the sarcophagus and its lid were found within the tomb, likely broken and scattered by ancient tomb robbers. The team spent two summers cleaning and matching the pieces before finishing the reconstruction. The work was funded by the United States Agency for International Development.

The tomb of Ramses VI is one of the largest in the Valley of the Kings, the ancient royal burial ground for Egypt's pharaohs, with a vaulted roof and bright paintings on the walls and ceilings.

Later, Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities revealed the fallen quartzite statues of Amenhotep III, who ruled until 1372 BC, and his wife, Queen Tiye. The statues rested on their sides, partially buried in Nile silt and a pool of water near the Temple of Memnon outside Luxor, about 500 kilometers (310 miles) south of Cairo.

Hawass said the find highlighted the "golden age of art and prosperity" under Amenhotep.

"I have never seen such a beautiful and magnificent statue," he said of the queen's statue. "It is so beautiful, so huge it shows all the details of a strong and mighty woman which has been so well expressed by the artist.

The 3-meter (10-foot) statue of Queen Tiye, one of the few well-known ancient queens, shows her wearing a wig and a long dress and holding a floral whisk and papyrus, royal symbols.

Also unveiled Sunday was a 1.3-meter-tall (4.3-foot-tall) white, headless hippopotamus found by German archaeologists excavating the Temple of Memnon site. Previously, hippopotamus representations were restricted to wall scenes and small models.

Egyptian and German archaeologists also showed newly excavated sites of a mortuary temple of Seti I in Qurna, on the west bank of the Nile River. The temple, dated to about 1250 BC and dedicated to the god Amun-Re, was built for Seti's father, Ramses I, who ruled for only two years. The temple was completed by Seti's son, Ramses II.

"This is the best preserved temple in this area," said Gunter Dreyer, director of the German Institute of Archaeology.
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Segereh
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2004 8:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I already wondered what that was Very Happy
Saw something on the news about it the other day, but they didn't give details and I missed the most of it. Happy now I know.
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Segereh
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PostPosted: Sun May 02, 2004 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CNN wrote:
Exhibit resurrects ancient Egyptian quest for afterlife
Saturday, April 24, 2004 Posted: 11:19 AM EDT (1519 GMT)


MILWAUKEE, Wisconsin (AP) -- The Egyptian god of the netherworld lies on his stomach and raises his head, his eyes open at the moment of his resurrection. The sleek stone statue of Osiris is one of more than 100 ancient Egyptian objects on display through August 8 at the Milwaukee Public Museum. The statue represents a goal of ancients Egyptians: triumph over death. It also embodies the theme of "The Quest for Immortality," the largest antiquities exhibit from Egypt ever to tour North America.

"It's an extraordinary chance to see unparalleled material from the Cairo collection," said Robert Ritner, associate professor of Egyptology at the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago. "The only other way you'd see these pieces is to travel to Egypt itself."

The granite statues, gold jewelry, alabaster jars and other art and funerary objects were excavated from the tombs of kings and nobles. Many were made as long as 4,000 years ago by people who believed they would help the dead in the afterlife. Carter Lupton, the museum's curator of ancient history, arranged the traveling exhibit in a way meant to explain the ancient Egyptians' pursuit of life after death.

"We're not just trying to show off the pieces, we're trying to tell a story," he said.

A 3,400-year-old gray statue of a mummified goddess holding a scepter stands at the front of the exhibit. Farther along, spotlights shine on the smooth, colossal granite head of a king wearing a crown shaped like a bowling pin, dating back 3,200 years ago.
The red granite sarcophagus of a princess who lived about 2,500 years ago proved so heavy the exhibit features only the coffin's 7,000-pound lid.
The Osiris statue lies beneath glass, one of the few statues and larger objects shown in a case. The statue, fitted with a metal crown and sculpted beard, is the only known depiction of the god at the moment he wakes from death for resurrection into eternal life, Lupton said.

The exhibit's climax is a full-scale re-creation of Pharaoh Thutmose III's burial chamber. The walls of the oval chamber are painted with a hieroglyphic text that serves as a type of guidebook to the netherworld.

Amid the stone statues and coffin lids, displayed in striking contrast to the exhibit's cobalt-colored walls, are delicate gold bracelets and collars, shiny gold funeral masks and other objects ancient Egyptians hoped would help them in the afterlife. Among the objects are:
- An 8-foot-long painted wooden boat found in a king's tomb that was meant to take him through the waters of the netherworld after his death.
- Mummy-shaped figures called ushebtis that were buried with the dead to do their labor.
- Four alabaster jars that held the internal organs of a prince who was mummified.
- A gold-and-bead bracelet with two tiny gold lions, made more than 3,000 years ago.

The exhibit, which is in the middle of a nine-city, five-year tour, was organized by a consortium of the Egyptian government, a Danish exhibits group and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The Milwaukee Public Museum spent more than $6 million to stage it. The Museum has sold 60,000 tickets in the exhibit's first two weeks, and museum president Michael Stafford expects to sell a total of 250,000. The museum is the exhibit's only Midwest venue, and Stafford said it's drawing visitors from across the region.

After Milwaukee, the show travels to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, September 12, 2004-January 23, 2005; Dayton Art Institute, September 1, 2005-January 3, 2006; Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee, June 11, 2006-October 9, 2006; Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Oregon, November 5, 2006-March 4, 2007; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, September 2, 2007- December 31, 2007.


Does it come anywhere close to St. Louis, Missouri? Cool
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Sun May 02, 2004 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That sounds like an exhibition I would love to see-but I can't because I don't live in the States...oh well, I do love not too far from the British Museum Very Happy
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Sun May 02, 2004 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I mean, LIVE not too far, not love! LOL Embarassed
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Segereh
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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, I didn't mean to confuse u with my lovely presence here Cool
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's not your fault-it's my clumsy fingers and my stupid typos, I'm sure we all have moments like that...
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anneke
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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Does it come anywhere close to St. Louis, Missouri?


Close is not the word I would use, but I might be able to catch a short flight Laughing

Sounds like it might be worth it.
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Segereh
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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sesen wrote:
I mean, LIVE not too far, not love! LOL
I wrote:
Sorry, I didn't mean to confuse u with my lovely presence here...
sesen wrote:
It's not your fault-it's my clumsy fingers and my stupid typos, I'm sure we all have moments like that...


Why can't I find a crying smiley? I'm heart-broken...
Ah! Found it...

Crying or Very sad
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Segereh
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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oops... Hope nobody notices... Anxious
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anneke
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 2:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aset pointed out to me that there was mention in the Swiss press about a 12m (ca. 36 ft) statue of Ramses II discovered recently in Akhmin.
The original text is at
http://www.swissinfo.org/sde/Swissinfo.html?siteSect=203&sid=5117453&ticker=true>
Quote:
Archäologen sind in Oberägypten auf eine zwölf Meter hohe Statue von Pharao Ramses II. gestossen. Nach Angaben der Altertümerverwaltung des Landes handelt es sich um das grösste bislang gefundene Standbild des altägyptischen Herrschers.
Ramses regierte von 1290 bis 1224 vor Christus. In dem Ort Akhmim, knapp 500 Kilometer südlich von Kairo, sind Archäologen bereits seit drei Jahren mit Ausgrabungen beschäftigt. Von der jetzt gefundenen Statue seien Kopf, Brust und Rumpf bereits freigelegt worden.

I roughly says that this 12m high statue is the largest statue of a King ever found.
In Akhmin, 500 km south of Cairo, archeologists have been conducting excavations for 3 years.
So far they have cleared the head and torso of the statue.

Quote:
Unterdessen haben Arbeiter bei Bauarbeiten für eine Moschee in Kairo ein Grab aus der 26. Pharaonen-Dynastie (bis 525 v.Chr.) entdeckt.
In der Gruft soll nach Angaben von ägyptischen Wissenschaftern der Aufseher einer Silbermine bestattet worden sein. Zahlreiche Beigaben, wie Schmuck, Statuen und Amulette, wurden in der Grabstätte gefunden. 011816 aug 04

While working on a mosque, a tomb from the 26th dynasty was discovered. It was the tomb of an Overseer of a silver mine.
They discovered clothing(?), statues and amulets.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Found another mention of the 26th dynasty tomb

Quote:
CAIRO - Workmen digging the foundations for a mosque in northeastern Cairo have unearthed the burial place believed to be of a silver mine supervisor from the 26th dynasty, 663 to 525 BC, Sabri Abdel Aziz, director for pharaonic antiquities, told AFP on Sunday.

Experts from the Supreme Council of Antiquities were called to the Ain Shams neighborhood to check the discovery and found a sarcophagus in one of the rooms that contained, according to inscriptions on the walls, the remains of the mine supervisor.

Other items recovered from the site, which was lay only five meters (16.5 feet) below the surface, included 365 small statues, amulets, and a tablet with drawings of the god Horus and goddess Isis.

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Segereh
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2004 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool...
365 little statues...
Shabti's for each day?
Important dude.
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isisinacrisis
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2004 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's what i thought when I saw 365...
Would be nice to see pictures of this tomb and it's artifacts.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2004 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was thinking the same thing Isis. Very Happy
I think it may be too recent a find for that. The story seems to have been reported on aug 1.

Did read some other info that suggested there was water in the tomb, and they were considering moving the entire tomb to higher ground.
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