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Where in AE is Amenhotep II?
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Meretseger
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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 3:56 pm    Post subject: Where in AE is Amenhotep II? Reply with quote

You known it is AMAZINGLY difficult to find information on this Pharaoh, presumably because his father and his grandson and great-grandson are so intensely interesting. Also his monuments seem to have suffered badly from time and reuse of cut stone. We don't even know the name of his chief wife - except it wasn't Tiaa, the mother of his eventual successor!
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 1:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peter Der Manuelian : Studies in the Reign of Amenophis II. - [Hildesheimer ägyptologische Beiträge - HÄB - 26]. - Hildesheim : Gerstenberg, 1987. - ISBN : 3-8067-8105-2. - XX, 317 p.

Angelo Sesana :

Preliminary Report of the eighth Italian Archaeological Mission - Temple of Amenophis II at Western Thebes, Egypt - Winter 2005/2006. - In: Annales du Service des Antiquités de l'Egypte - ASAE - 82. - Cairo : Publications du Conseil Suprême des Antiquités de l'Égypte, 2008. - ISBN : 978-977-479-033-1. - ISSN : 1687-1510. - pp. 261 - 287.

Preliminary Report of the Seventh Italian Archaeological Mission - Temple of Amenhotep II at Western Thebes - Winter 2004/2005. - In: Memnonia - Bulletin éd. par l'Association pour la Sauvegarde du Ramesseum - 16. - Cairo : Lumina, 2005. - ISSN : 1110-4910. - pp. 219 - 226.

Temple of Amenhotep II - 6th archaeological expedition - Preliminary report. - [6th archaeological expedition on the area of the temple of Amenhotep II, Western Thebes (December 2003 - January 2004)]. - Como : CFB (Centro Comasco di Egittologia F. Ballerini), 2004. - 52 p.

Temple of Amenophis II - 5th Archaeological expedition on the area of the Temple of Amenophis II, Western Thebes (December 2002 - January 2003) - Preliminary Report. - Como : CFB, 2003. - 46 p.

Preliminary report of the third archaeological expedition on the area of the temple of Amenophis II at western Thebes. - In: Memnonia. - Cairo : Dar Namatallah Press, 2002. - pp. 227 - 243.

Temple of Amenophis II - 4th archaeological expedition - Preliminary report. - [4th archaeological expedition on the area of the temple of Amenophis II, Western Thebes (December 2001 - January 2002)]. - Como : CFB, 2002. - 46 p.

Charles C. Van Siclen III :

Preliminary Report on Epigraphic Work Done in the Edifice of Amenhotep II, Seasons of 1988-89 and 1989-90. - In: Varia aegyptiaca - VA - 6. - San Antonio, Tex. : Van Siclen Books, 1990. - ISSN : 0887-4026. - pp. 75 - 90.

Archaeological Expedition to the Precinct of the Goddess Mut at South Karnak/1 - The alabaster shrine of King Amenhotep II. - In: The Brooklyn Museum Archaeological Expedition to the Precinct of the Goddess Mut at South Karnak - 1. - San Antonio, Tex. : VanSiclen Books, 1986. - ISBN : 0-933175-05-1. - XV, 58, 60 p.

Amenhotep II at Dendera (Iunet). - In: Varia aegyptiaca - VA - 1. - 1985. - pp. 69 - 73.

Two Theban monuments from the Reign of Amenhotep II. - San Antonio, Tex. : VanSiclen, 1982. - 46 p.

Scott Morschauser : Approbation or Disapproval? The Conclusion of the Letter of Amenophis II to User-Satet, Viceroy of Kush (Urk. IV,1344.10-20). - In: Studien zur altägyptischen Kultur - SAK - 24. - Hamburg : Buske, 1998. - ISBN : 3-87548-171-2. - ISSN : 0340-2215. - pp. 203 - 222.

William J. Murnane : Ancient Egyptian Coregencies. - [Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization - SAOC - 40]. - Chicago : Oriental Institute, 1977. - ISBN : 0-918986-03-6. - XVIII, 271 p. - Online - PDF.

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kylejustin
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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i don't think he had a great royal wife, as he was scared of a hatshepsut situation.....hence why thutmose IV was not the legitimate heir.....probably because there was no one designated.
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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a stela of a Prince Amenhotep with the title usually bestowed on crown princes and his name in a cartouche who was probably Amenhotep II's official heir. As we know Thutmose IV was his successor so presumably Amenhotep pre-deceased his father - or was given a helping hand into the afterlife shortly thereafter....
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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the references, Lutz. Smile
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PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Meretseger wrote:
There is a stela of a Prince Amenhotep with the title usually bestowed on crown princes and his name in a cartouche who was probably Amenhotep II's official heir. ...

Would you please ensure a source for this information?

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Meretseger
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PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aidan Dodson's 'Royal Families of Ancient Egypt'. I think he's mentioned in 'Chronicles of the Pharaohs' too. One or the other includes a line drawing of the stela.
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PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kylejustin wrote:
i don't think he had a great royal wife, as he was scared of a hatshepsut situation.....hence why thutmose IV was not the legitimate heir.....probably because there was no one designated.


Betsy Bryan wrote a book "The reign of Thutmose IV" several years ago.

She also agreed about the lack of GRW due to Hatshepsut situation, but she also said that Thutmose IV was the legitimate heir, as evidenced by that fact that the heir's name was Thutmose -- with kings' names alternating between Amenhotep and Thutmose.

It's been many years since I read the book, but I remember enjoying it, and it's wroth the read.

Bryan also mentioned the possibility that Tiaa was somehow related to the Akhim family of Yuya, but stated that there was no positive proof.

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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2012 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tiaa was clearly not important until her son succeeded to the throne as all her monuments date to Thutmose IV's reign. Meryetre's prominence over any consorts of Amenhotep II may have simply been due to the fact that the 'Queen Mother' always took precedence over other king's wives as we see from the stela of Thutmose II where his stepmother Queen Ahmose is shown preceding her daughter Hatshepsut. Maybe Amenhotep II had a 'mommy' complex? Certainly Meryetre prominence doesn't bespeak a distrust of female power.
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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2012 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Meretseger wrote:
Meryetre's prominence over any consorts of Amenhotep II may have simply been due to the fact that the 'Queen Mother' always took precedence over other king's wives as we see from the stela of Thutmose II where his stepmother Queen Ahmose is shown preceding her daughter Hatshepsut. Maybe Amenhotep II had a 'mommy' complex?


Or maybe because he was still very young when he was enthroned.
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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 4:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

waenre wrote:
Thutmose IV was the legitimate heir, as evidenced by that fact that the heir's name was Thutmose -- with kings' names alternating between Amenhotep and Thutmose.

That makes no sense really.
Infant mortality rates would have been too high for such sequences to be predictable.
The alternation of names is rather simple coincidence than anything else.
Thereby, the ONLY king where this would have succeeded with (if on purpose) was Amenhotep III.
As you can only call something a sequence when there's a second occurence, right?
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Meretseger wrote:
Aidan Dodson's 'Royal Families of Ancient Egypt'. I think he's mentioned in 'Chronicles of the Pharaohs' too. One or the other includes a line drawing of the stela.

During there excavations in the years 1936-37 at the Great Sphinx of Giza discovered Selim Hassan and his team well in the area of the Temple of Amenhotep II, among other things, three stela named by them A, B and C. Founders of the stela were royal princes, sons of Amenhotep II's. Only one name has been preserved on stela C: Amenemipet. Where the stelas are today is not known, there are only photographs and drawings.

Dodson / Hilton give in there "Complete Royal Families of AE" (2004) on page 138 a drawing of stela A, taken from Selim Hassan : The Sphinx. - Cairo : Government Press, 1949. - p. 188. - Fig. 39:



The publication of the excavation appeared as Selim Hassan : Excavations at Gîza VIII. 1936–1937. The Great Sphinx and its Secrets. Historical Studies in the Light of Recent Excavations. - Cairo : Government Press, 1953. On pages 83 - 87 stela A and B be discussed and a photo of the stelas are shown:



The text published here obviously does not agree with the drawing from 1949. Hassan mentions no cartouche in the erased part of Stela A. For Stela B he mentions the possibility that there once was one. But its far from definately ...

In addition it gets interesting when you look at the list of members of the excavation team from 1939. Here appears a certain Dorothy Eady, better known as "Om Seti", in here own words contradict born priestess of Hathor in the temple of Sethy I. at Abydos. She seems to be the originator of the drawing from Stela A. Part of here visions was that Ramses II and also Thutmose IV killed older brothers (and chosen heirs) to climb the throne.

If you have a look at the photos of the stela it seems clear to me that on stela A there is no residual of a cartouche visible. On stela B there is a possibility in front of the head of the prince (as Hassan also says in his book from 1953). But you can not be secure, it could also be just erased normal inscription.

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Meretseger
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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Robson wrote:
Or maybe because he was still very young when he was enthroned.


I seem to recall that Amenhotep II mentions somewhere that he was between eighteen and twenty at the time of his accession - but I can't tell you where. I've been reading a lot of things about him and they're all jumbled up. The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt perhaps?
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Meretseger
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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yup, that's the line drawing. Seems to me there *might* be a oval shadow behind the prince's head on Stela A but who knows? In any case it is clear that roughly half the inscription - presumably including the name of the prince - has been carefully erased - by a rival?

Amenhotep is known to have had several sons - from the tomb of their tutor - It is not impossible that there were other heirs before Thutmose IV and those erasures COULD indicate a rivalry for the throne. Or not.
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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2012 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Meretseger wrote:


I seem to recall that Amenhotep II mentions somewhere that he was between eighteen and twenty at the time of his accession - but I can't tell you where. I've been reading a lot of things about him and they're all jumbled up. The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt perhaps?


Yeah, I think you are right: "Now his Majesty appeared as king as a fine youth after he had become 'well developed', and had completed eighteen years in his strength and bravery."

From the inscription of his "Sphynx Stele" - Urk. IV. 1279.8-10
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