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Leg of Seth

 
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Graphis
Citizen
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Joined: 27 Aug 2012
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2012 7:21 pm    Post subject: Leg of Seth Reply with quote

Hi, I'm doing some research, and I'm having trouble finding primary sources.

I'm interested in the Leg of Seth, that, apparently, Horus tore off and threw up into the sky.

It's been identified as the Plough, or Big Dipper asterism.

But what I'm looking for is the source of this myth, the actual text and it's English translation, as opposed to the endless "retellings" of it by other authors. Is it in a particular papyrus, or inscription, somewhere?

Many thanks.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2012 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All I could find was a reference in Herman Te Velde's book Seth, God of Confusion: A Study of His Role in Egyptian Mythology and Religion (1977)
http://books.google.com/books?id=0po3AAAAIAAJ

On page 86-87 it refers to the story of Horus cutting out the fore-leg of Seth.

This seems to come from Papyrus Jumilhac.

That papyrus can be found here:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/56724102/60/Papyrus-Jumilhac-Greco-Roman-Period

There's also Le Papyrus Jumilhac by Jacques Vandier (Paris 1962)
I think this is the paper:
http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/article/crai_0065-0536_1945_num_89_2_77842

That's it on short notice Smile
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Aset
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2012 1:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
source of this myth

de.wikipedia.org makes mention of Papyrus Jumilhac (Louvre E 17110)

Aset
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Graphis
Citizen
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2012 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you both for your prompt responses.

However, the link you supplied was not to the Papyrus Jumilhac, but to a paper on the Gazelle: there was no mention of the incident I'm referring to.

I'm aware of the Vandier book, but as it's in French, it's of no use to me. Has the PJ never been published in English?

Also, I don't read German either, I'm afraid.

It seems to be extremely difficult to find primary sources in Egyptology, I don't know why. If I wanted to read the Icelandic Eddas, or the Ancient Greek myths, in their primary sources, these texts are easily and cheaply available. But Egyptian? Impossible to find... Heaven knows why, considering probably more people find Ancient Egypt fascinating than Ancient Iceland!
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2012 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Graphis wrote:
... Papyrus Jumilhac ... Has the PJ never been published in English? ...

As far as I know only in parts, for example ...

HOLLIS, Susan Tower : The Ancient Egyptian "Tale of Two Brothers" - The Oldest Fairy Tale in the World. - Norman and London : University of Oklahoma Press, 1990. - XII, 276 p. - ISBN : 0-8061-2269-2 :

Egyptological Bibliography (AEB), 2001 wrote:
As the author points out in the introduction, it is the aim of this study to place the Tale of Two Brothers in its cultural and historical context and to elicit the meaning and purpose of the tale in its own time, by using the tools of modern scholarship from a variety of disciplines such as folklore and anthropology,. At the same time the study seeks to provide a model for the examination of diverse narratives. After a fairly literal translation of the Pap. d'Orbiney as transcribed by Gardiner in his Late Egyptian Stories, the author surveys in ch. 1 the issues raised in previous studies, important questions being its character as myth or folk-tale, its composition, style and author, the Egyptian context, allegorical and psychological approaches, and the connection with the contents of the Pap. Jumilhac. Ch. 2 is concerned with the brothers Bata and Anubis. First, the writing of the name Bata in the Ramesside Period, biconsonantal names commonly related to Bata and their contexts, the god Bata, Lord of Saka; then, the ancient mortuary god Anubis, whose home town and relationships are traced and whose role in the funerary religion is discussed. At the end of the ch. a note on the negative aspects of Anubis. Rural Egypt, where the brothers are at home, is the subject of ch. 3. It is in this setting that the seduction of Bata by Anubis' wife was attempted. The author discusses the reactions of the brothers, the confrontation and the separation between Bata and Anubis, and devotes an excursus to the motif of the seductive wife of Potiphar in the O.T. book of Genesis ch. 39. In ch. 4, on the severing of the phallus, the journey to the valley of the aS and the heart cut out by Bata, these motifs are subjected to an analysis. If these acts are considered separately, each has implications that suggest Bata underwent a kind of death, and all three together emphasize that he had indeed entered the Hereafter by the time he settled in the valley. In this connection the subjects of the phallus of Osiris, the swallowing of the phallus by the nar fish, the effect of the self-emasculation, the valley of the aS and its significance, Bata's heart and Egyptian beliefs about the heart, Bata's heart on the tree pass in review. At the end of the chapter an excursus on Osiris in Byblos as an analogy with Bata and the cedar tree. Ch. 5 is concerned with Bata's life in the valley: Bata as a hunter; Bata, Bull of the Ennead; Bata's wife; pA ym as the dangerous sea. The next episode concerns royal Egypt (ch. 6). Bata's wife goes to Egypt, the king's inquiry about her husband Bata led to the betrayal of his secret and resulted in his death. The search of Anubis results in his revivification and appearance as a bull, which when slaughtered produced two persea trees from his blood. In this connection a note on Kamutef follows. Bata's actual birth as heir comprises the final component needed to fit him for kingship, to which he acceded. In the concluding ch. 7 the author assesses the tale in the wider context of rite de passage and kingship.

Appendix with selective translations from the Pap. Jumilhac, bibliography and index added.


Greetings, Lutz.
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