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Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt?
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Djhuty
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PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2013 12:35 am    Post subject: Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt? Reply with quote

I'd like to prevail on the collective experience of this forum if I may?
I am thinking of buying the Oxford Encyclopaedia of Ancient Egypt,
Redford editor. However reports are that the images are rubbish. Is it
still worth buying? Is there an upcoming revision planned? Is it
available on CD? It seems to be available as an online subscription... I
asked the publishers but they haven't replied. Is there something better
to buy? Oh, and I know about Lexikon der Ägyptologie but it's off my list
as most content is not in English.

More particularly I'd like something on Egyptian ontology, especially
about the nature of the soul. I'm reading Uzdavinys' Philosophy as a
Rite of Rebirth atm and, so far, I highly recommend it. It's a pleasant
escape from the confines of rigid rationalism, straight into the arms of
praxis. Can anyone recommend anything else please? English preferred.


Thanks,

Djhuty
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Montuhotep88
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have it (them). What do you mean by the images being "rubbish"? The illustrations aren't as good as they'd be in a big glossy coffee table book, true, but they're not really the main thing.

It's pricey; mine was a Christmas gift from my wonderful wife. Smile
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 5:21 pm    Post subject: Re: Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt? Reply with quote

Djhuty wrote:
I'd like to prevail on the collective experience of this forum if I may?
I am thinking of buying the Oxford Encyclopaedia of Ancient Egypt,
Redford editor. However reports are that the images are rubbish. Is it
still worth buying? Is there an upcoming revision planned? Is it
available on CD? It seems to be available as an online subscription...


That is not the Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt (hereafter OEAE): You are speaking about the OEB (Oxford Egyptological Bibliography), which is a continuation of the Annual Egyptological Bibliography (AEB), under the Oxford aegis. That is a record of all Egyptological and Egyptology-related publications, and is used primarily by scholars.

The Redford Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt is not, AFAIK, due for either revision or expansion to online resources. I would also disagree that the images are "rubbish,", but it's the dead-on scholarship that separates this work from being the usual books on ancient Egypt. Between this and Redford's 2002 The Ancient Gods Speak: A Guide to Egyptian Religion, also by Oxford University Press, much of what is known about ancient Egyptian religion is expressed in these two works (The latter being articles that did not make it into the OEAE).

Djhuty wrote:
I asked the publishers but they haven't replied. Is there something better to buy? Oh, and I know about Lexikon der Ägyptologie but it's off my list as most content is not in English.


You could try the UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology; like the OEAE, it has short articles on topics concerning ancient Egypt, but the Lexikon der Ägyptologie is still the best resource on Egyptology (and will continue to be since it, like the Woerterbuch, are ongoing, constantly revised publications).
You do yourself a disservice to NOT use either of these resources, simply because they are in German: many of the best Egyptological works are in German, and there are translation services (like Systran and others, via web search engines) available for free online. I would say, by refusing to read these works, you cut yourself off from about 60% of most good Egyptological works.

Djhuty wrote:
...particularly I'd like something on Egyptian ontology, especially about the nature of the soul. I'm reading Uzdavinys' Philosophy as a Rite of Rebirth atm and, so far, I highly recommend it. It's a pleasant escape from the confines of rigid rationalism, straight into the arms of praxis. Can anyone recommend anything else please? English preferred.


There are very few works on Egyptology onotology since there are no coherent works on Egyptian philosophy by the ancient Egyptians themselves.

There are religious texts which tell us - vaguely - about how the ancient Egyptian viewed the soul. but then one has to remember that ancient Egyptians had a tripartite view of the human soul (ka, ba, and akh), which was still separate from the idea of self-consciousness, which the ancient Egyptians believed immanated from the heart (/ib/) of a person and "informed" them of ethical values, emotions, and so on.

The ancient Egyptian had no concept of 'mind' in the sense of a brain function (which was why they disposed of brain material during embalment). The best treatise they ancient Egyptian left us on how a "soul" feels and reacts is the ancient Egyptian didactic parable of Dispute Between a Man and his Ba. This parable has been covered most recently by

Allen, James P. 2011. The Debate between a Man and His Soul: A Masterpiece of Ancient Egyptian Literature. Leiden: Brill.

Other related scholarly works on the study of 'soul' in ancient Egyptian thought include:

Barguet, P. 1951. D'une representation du Ka royal. ASAE 51: 205-15.

Bell, L. 1985. Luxor Temple and the Cult of the Royal Ka. JNES 44: 251 294.

Bolshakov, A. O. 1997. Man and His Double in Egyptian Ideology of the Old Kingdom. Ägypten und Altes Testament 37. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.

Friedman, F. D. 2000. Akh. In D. B. Redford, Ed., The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt, 1: 47-48. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Friedman also wrote her dissertation on the topic of the Akh, so I will try and find that citation later.)

Gordon, A. A. 1996. The kA as an Animating Force. JARCE 33: 31-35.

Greven, L. 1952. Der Ka in Theologie und Königskult der Ägypter des Alten Reiches. Ägyptologische Forschungen 17. Gluckstadt, Hamburg and New York: J. J. Augustin.

Kaplony, P. 1984. Leben «Sub Specie Aeternatis» als Xri-kA. In I. d'Égyptologie, Ed., Mélanges Adolphe Gutbub: 115-123. Montpellier: Publication de la Recherche - Université de Montpellier.

Ockinga, B. 1995. Hatshepsut's Election to Kingship : The Ba and the Ka in Egyptian Royal Ideology. Bulletin of the Australian Centre for Egyptology 6: 89 - 102.

Piankoff, A. and H. Jacquet-Gordon 1974. The Wandering of the Soul. Egyptian Religious Texts and Representations. Bollingen Series XL: 6. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Žabkar, L. V. 1968. A Study of the Ba Concept in Ancient Egyptian Texts. Studies in Ancient Oriental Civilization (SAOC) 34. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

These works give you what we know of the "philosophy" of ancient Egyptians, though they did not categorise their thought in such a fashion:

Assmann, J. and G. G. Stroumsa, Eds. 1999. Transformation of the Inner Self in Ancient Religions. Studies in the History of Religions (Numen Book Series). Vol. LXXXIII. Leiden: Brill.

Baines, J. 1991. Society, Morality, and Religious Practice. In B. E. Shafer, Ed., Religion in Ancient Egypt: Gods, Myths, and Personal Practice: 123-200. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Englund, G., Ed. 1989. The Religion of the Ancient Egyptians: Cognitive Structures and Popular Expressions. BOREAS 20: Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations. Uppsala: ACTA Universitatis Upsaliensis.

Frankfort, H., H. A. Groenewegen-Frankfort, et al. 1977 (1946). The Intellectual Adventure of Ancient Man: An Essay on Speculative Thought in the Ancient Near East. Oriental Institute Essay. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Hornung, E. 1992. Idea Into Image: Essays on Ancient Egyptian Thought. E. Bredeck, transl. New York: Timken Publishers.

Lichtheim, M. 1992. Maat in Egyptian Autobiographies and Related Studies. Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis 120. Freibourg: University of Freibourg.

Simpson, W. K., Ed. 1989. Religion and Philosophy in Ancient Egypt. Yale Egyptological Studies (YES) 3. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Stillwell, G. A. 2000. Conduct and Behavior as Determinants for the Afterlife: A Comparison of the Judgments of the Dead in Ancient Egypt and Ancient Greece. Ph. D. Dissertation (Unpublished). College of Arts and Sciences. Florida State University.

HTH.
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Oriental Institute
Oriental Studies
Doctoral Programme [Egyptology]
Oxford University
Oxford, United Kingdom

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Montuhotep88
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 12:32 pm    Post subject: Re: Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt? Reply with quote

neseret wrote:
Between this and Redford's 2002 The Ancient Gods Speak: A Guide to Egyptian Religion, also by Oxford University Press, much of what is known about ancient Egyptian religion is expressed in these two works (The latter being articles that did not make it into the OEAE).


Ah-HA! I'd wondered about this. I noticed the similarity and thought initially that Ancient Gods Speak was somehow an extract of the encyclopedia, but the articles didn't seem to match up. Smile
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 4:36 am    Post subject: Re: Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt? Reply with quote

Thanks once again Katherine for a detailed and thorough reply. I will follow up on those sources you mention.

While I will freely acknowledge that I am a slack tart for not learning German yet, I do recognise it's importance in this field, and I will get to it, I would like to say that I am not refusing to use works in other languages. I am simply not happy to write about them because of the high likelihood of my misunderstanding what they are actually saying, which is especially a danger when one uses machine translation services. Sadly those are the only translation services available to me as my institution will not pay for translations of articles for postgrads. Sad

Quote:
That is not the Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt (hereafter OEAE): You are speaking about the OEB (Oxford Egyptological Bibliography), which is a continuation of the Annual Egyptological Bibliography (AEB), under the Oxford aegis. That is a record of all Egyptological and Egyptology-related publications, and is used primarily by scholars.


I am slightly confused to what you are referring to as 'that' here. If you meant to say that the OEAE is not available online I believe you are mistaken as it is available as part of the online Oxford Reference Library. I have since had a reply from the publisher who sadly confirm it is not available as a CD or in any digital form other than in the Oxford Reference Library.

Djhuty
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 5:24 pm    Post subject: Re: Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt? Reply with quote

Djhuty wrote:
I am slightly confused to what you are referring to as 'that' here. If you meant to say that the OEAE is not available online I believe you are mistaken as it is available as part of the online Oxford Reference Library. I have since had a reply from the publisher who sadly confirm it is not available as a CD or in any digital form other than in the Oxford Reference Library.


Access to the OEAE is only by a subscription service via OUP (unless the article is accessible by the author's desire), though, and normally not freely accessible. I thought you wished for a free access portal to online resources, of which I am not aware. If you are at university, as you say, you should be able to access it via your school library, as most take out subscriptions, or via an ATHENS portal.

To "that", I meant the OEB/AEB, and not the OEAE. The OEB/AEB is also a subscription service, but access is generally restricted to scholars in the field. It comes as part of the International Association of Egyptologists' [IAE] membership, though a CD-ROM version of publications from 1847-1997 was once available (I don't think that CD-ROM is produced any more). This is why I say the OEB/AEB is now restricted mainly to scholars in the field.

Sorry for the confusion.

You also wrote, in concerning German language publications:

Quote:
I am simply not happy to write about them because of the high likelihood of my misunderstanding what they are actually saying, which is especially a danger when one uses machine translation services. Sadly those are the only translation services available to me as my institution will not pay for translations of articles for postgrads.


This again I don't understand: most universities offer short courses in German for technical reading (Oxford does, for example, in French and German). Have you looked into this? Many uni's offer it to post-grads for little or no charge, since it's necessary for their work.

However, depending upon your knowledge of any Egyptological-related language (French, German, and English), I don't see why you can't use machine translations in many cases. I have used, with some success, FreeTranslation.com, which gives as near as possible the correct translation of text. As I know German, I can tell when it's off a smidgen (same is true for French as well), and can make corrections. So, I wouldn't be so quick to give up on machine translation services.

Now, when it comes to other languages, which also can relate to Egyptology (Czech, Dutch, Arabic, Polish, and Hebrew, come quickly to mind), I would say in such cases, it's best to find a colleague who knows the language and can assist you, or a qualified translator. For this, payment may be necessary. I had a Dutch article translated for me into English, and the translator merely read the article in English into a vocal format (MP3) which I now possess. That way, I can refer to the article over and over, and I have enough general knowledge of Dutch (via German), to figure out which page she was reading from. I can assure you it was worth every penny I paid for it as well.

You have to be creative if you don't know a language in many cases, but merely saying you don't know a language (if you're studying Egyptology at university) is usually not a valid excuse for not reading certain articles. The University department EXPECTS you to learn the languages so you can access your resources.

I am aware of an occasion where a student at University studied some years into their post-graduate degree without accessing German articles because (they said) they just didn't know the language and so, didn't feel they needed to read them. Needless to say, they missed out on about 40-60% of their resources, and at time mid-thesis review, failed. That's a big blow to someone thinking they were well on their way to a post-grad degree, and not something I would ever want to happen to me, I can assure you.

Just a thought.
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 8:25 pm    Post subject: Re: Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt? Reply with quote

neseret wrote:
... To "that", I meant the OEB/AEB, and not the OEAE. The OEB/AEB is also a subscription service, but access is generally restricted to scholars in the field. It comes as part of the International Association of Egyptologists' [IAE] membership, ...

Small correction / comment: there is also subscription for individuals, independently of the IAE - membership, possible. The rates apply from 1 January 2013: 60,- GBP for one year. See OEB, Griffith Institute - Subscription information.

Greetings, Lutz.
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Djhuty
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PostPosted: Fri May 17, 2013 4:06 am    Post subject: Re: Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt? Reply with quote

Quote:
This again I don't understand: most universities offer short courses in German for technical reading (Oxford does, for example, in French and German). Have you looked into this? Many uni's offer it to post-grads for little or no charge, since it's necessary for their work.


You are lucky to be at a well resourced university. Sadly not all of us are so lucky.

Quote:
However, depending upon your knowledge of any Egyptological-related language (French, German, and English), I don't see why you can't use machine translations in many cases. I have used, with some success, FreeTranslation.com, which gives as near as possible the correct translation of text. As I know German, I can tell when it's off a smidgen (same is true for French as well), and can make corrections. So, I wouldn't be so quick to give up on machine translation services.


I assure you I didn't give up on machine translation easily. It is not always as simple as getting the text translated. Often articles are distributed as pdfs that are images not text. One first has to OCR the text and then translate it. It's hard to correct OCR errors when one is unfamiliar with the language. I don't know of any OCR software that understands Egyptian... My experience with machine translation has been far from successfull. For example, here is a paragraph from an article I am trying to get translated presently. I had to first OCR it as it is an image. This result was this;

Nach unserem Text müsste das zuerst genannte ‘nh = Schu mit dem H immel, die Tefnet (= w3s) mit der Erde verbunden sein. Diese Aufteilung von Schu und Tefnet in einen oberen und einen unteren Bezirk lässt sich auch sonst noch belegen: Auf Untersuchungen von Siegfried Schott gestützt (Mythe S.22), konnte ich (GM25, 1977, 95) feststellen: «So dienen Schu und Tefnet als die beiden Horizont-Gottheiten (MAS 10, Taf. 6-7), wobei Schu dem Himmel (mns.t hrj.t) und Tefnet der Erde (mns.t hrj.t) verbunden ist». Uber die (ebenfalls bei Winter, a.a.O. behandelte) Gleichung Schu und Tefnet = nhh und d.t lässt sich diese Aufteilung der beiden Himmelsstützen auf « oben » und « unten » auch noch bildlich belegen: In der bekannten Darstellung von Neheh und Djet als Himmelsstützen hält Neheh die hohe (= östliche = himmlische) Stütze, während Djet die niedrige (= westliche = unterirdische) Stütze in der Hand hält (MAS 10, Abb. 6) (10).

Which machine translation turned into this;

According to our text, the first mentioned '= nh would schools with the H immel that Tefnut (= W3S) be connected to the earth. This division of Shu and Tefnut into an upper and a lower district can not prove otherwise: based on studies by Siegfried Schott (myth p.22), I could (GM25, 1977, 95) state: "To serve Shu and Tefnut horizon as the two deities (MAS 10, pi 6-7), and training (hrj.t mns.t) the heavens and the Earth Tefnut (mns.t hrj.t) is connected. "About the (also in winter, supra treated) equation Shu and Tefnut = nhh and dt, such separation of two celestial props to be "up" and "down" even figuratively prove: holding in the well known representation of Neheh and Djet than heaven supports Neheh the high (= eastern = heavenly) support, while the low Djet (= western = underground) support holds in his hand (MAS 10, Fig 6) (10).

This is seriously inadequate. A person with a greater understanding of Egyptology would certainly get more out of this than I. However for me this is not enough for me to gain any usefull understanding. Also I have broken at least one law by OCRing it.


Quote:
You have to be creative if you don't know a language in many cases, but merely saying you don't know a language (if you're studying Egyptology at university) is usually not a valid excuse for not reading certain articles. The University department EXPECTS you to learn the languages so you can access your resources.


I am not studying Egyptology. I am studying sociology, so Egypt is a secondary research area in my thesis. Because of this I can get most of what I need from the English literature. There are in fact zero egyptologists at my university, so there isn't even anyone I can go to locally for help. Because there are no Egyptologists no one has added Egyptology resources to the list of those available via electronic means. Because of the current mercenary state of academic publishing and a consequent lack of funding quite a limited selection or articles and resources are available, one's in areas for which there are no researchers at my instituion are impossible to find.

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PostPosted: Fri May 17, 2013 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ultimately, one must probably determine how serious and important the whole is to one. In Germany the study of Egyptology is possible at several universities. However, I do not know one of them where the ability to read and understand literature in English and French is not a prerequisite for admission to the courses. In addition and as a rule, knowledge required in Greek and Latin, which can be made up in the first year, however.

Greetings, Lutz.
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PostPosted: Fri May 17, 2013 3:59 pm    Post subject: Re: Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt? Reply with quote

Quote:
However, depending upon your knowledge of any Egyptological-related language (French, German, and English), I don't see why you can't use machine translations in many cases. I have used, with some success, FreeTranslation.com, which gives as near as possible the correct translation of text. As I know German, I can tell when it's off a smidgen (same is true for French as well), and can make corrections. So, I wouldn't be so quick to give up on machine translation services.


Djhuty wrote:
I assure you I didn't give up on machine translation easily. It is not always as simple as getting the text translated. Often articles are distributed as pdfs that are images not text. One first has to OCR the text and then translate it. It's hard to correct OCR errors when one is unfamiliar with the language. I don't know of any OCR software that understands Egyptian... My experience with machine translation has been far from successfull. For example, here is a paragraph from an article I am trying to get translated presently. I had to first OCR it as it is an image. This result was this;

Nach unserem Text müsste das zuerst genannte ‘nh = Schu mit dem H immel, die Tefnet (= w3s) mit der Erde verbunden sein. Diese Aufteilung von Schu und Tefnet in einen oberen und einen unteren Bezirk lässt sich auch sonst noch belegen: Auf Untersuchungen von Siegfried Schott gestützt (Mythe S.22), konnte ich (GM25, 1977, 95) feststellen: «So dienen Schu und Tefnet als die beiden Horizont-Gottheiten (MAS 10, Taf. 6-7), wobei Schu dem Himmel (mns.t hrj.t) und Tefnet der Erde (mns.t hrj.t) verbunden ist». Uber die (ebenfalls bei Winter, a.a.O. behandelte) Gleichung Schu und Tefnet = nhh und d.t lässt sich diese Aufteilung der beiden Himmelsstützen auf « oben » und « unten » auch noch bildlich belegen: In der bekannten Darstellung von Neheh und Djet als Himmelsstützen hält Neheh die hohe (= östliche = himmlische) Stütze, während Djet die niedrige (= westliche = unterirdische) Stütze in der Hand hält (MAS 10, Abb. 6) (10).

Which machine translation turned into this;

According to our text, the first mentioned '= nh would schools with the H immel that Tefnut (= W3S) be connected to the earth. This division of Shu and Tefnut into an upper and a lower district can not prove otherwise: based on studies by Siegfried Schott (myth p.22), I could (GM25, 1977, 95) state: "To serve Shu and Tefnut horizon as the two deities (MAS 10, pi 6-7), and training (hrj.t mns.t) the heavens and the Earth Tefnut (mns.t hrj.t) is connected. "About the (also in winter, supra treated) equation Shu and Tefnut = nhh and dt, such separation of two celestial props to be "up" and "down" even figuratively prove: holding in the well known representation of Neheh and Djet than heaven supports Neheh the high (= eastern = heavenly) support, while the low Djet (= western = underground) support holds in his hand (MAS 10, Fig 6) (10).


With 4 corrections (separating the ancient Egyptian by / /, connecting "H" + "immel" = "Himmel", and correcting /nhh/ and /dt/ to /nHH/ and /Dt/), I got this from FreeTranslation.com:

After our text, the first named / 'nh/ = must (be) Schu with the sky, that are connected (to) Tefnet (= wAs) with the earth. This distribution of Schu and Tefnet in an upper and a lower district yet can be covered also otherwise: on investigations of Siegfried Schott (Mythe S.22) (this is) supported; I could (GM25, 1977, 95) assess: "So Schu and Tefnet serve as both horizons divinities (MAS 10, Taf. 6-7), whereby Schu the sky (/mns. t hrj. t/) and Tefnet of the earth (/mns. t hrj. t/) is connected". Also that (also in Winter, a. a. O.) treated (the) equation Schu and Tefnet = /nHH/ and /D. t/; this distribution lets itself both sky supports on "above" and "below" also yet graphically (is)cover(ed): In the well known representation of Neheh and Djet as a sky supports, Neheh the high (= eastern = heavenly) support, while Djet the low (= western = underground) holds the support in its hand (MAS 10, fig. 6) (10). ((words) added after translation, for clarity in English)

Now, I admit that knowing that /nHH/ and /Dt/ in Egyptian transliteration is the same as "Neheh" and "Djet" is something you may not obviously know; however a little looking in Egyptian dictionaries would have made this clear (both are terms for the two types of "eternity" the Egyptians recognised).

Djhuty wrote:
This is seriously inadequate. A person with a greater understanding of Egyptology would certainly get more out of this than I. However for me this is not enough for me to gain any usefull understanding. Also I have broken at least one law by OCRing it.


As far as I am aware, copying via OCR scan to render a translation for your own scholarly use is part of the "fair use" exemption of copyright law. You are not rendering a a copy to claim as your own work, which would be a copyright violation. So, I'm not sure what "law" you think you have broken in OCR scanning a foreign article, if your intent is merely to understand the article for your own research.

Djhuty wrote:
Quote:
You have to be creative if you don't know a language in many cases, but merely saying you don't know a language (if you're studying Egyptology at university) is usually not a valid excuse for not reading certain articles. The University department EXPECTS you to learn the languages so you can access your resources.


I am not studying Egyptology. I am studying sociology, so Egypt is a secondary research area in my thesis. Because of this I can get most of what I need from the English literature. There are in fact zero egyptologists at my university, so there isn't even anyone I can go to locally for help.


If only interpreting ancient Egyptian language was your problem, then I could see what you mean. But that isn't the issue: it's modern foreign languages that publish articles in the field that you need to read, and every university I know of can offer you some form of assistance in getting you to be able to read those languages. Even Sociology, as a discipline, is published in languages other than English, after all.

Djhuty wrote:
Because there are no Egyptologists no one has added Egyptology resources to the list of those available via electronic means.


There is amazing access to Egypological resources online: why not search for them yourself rather than wait on someone to post them for you? You want to run your ideas past professional Egyptologists? I suggest searching "Egyptologists Electronic Forum," and go from there.

Be warned that the professionals on that list will refer you to French and German articles, and no, they will NOT translate them for you.

Djhuty wrote:
Because of the current mercenary state of academic publishing and a consequent lack of funding quite a limited selection or articles and resources are available, one's in areas for which there are no researchers at my instituion are impossible to find.


If you are at university, you will likely have access to JSTOR via your library system: that should give you access to about 70% of most Egyptological articles available, and if you find something you need and it's not in JSTOR, I suggest looking into interlibrary loan (ILL): you can find where books/articles are through ILL services at COPAC (in the UK) and likely through the State Library Catalogue searches (in the US).

And you may have to actually BUY some of the works you need: I find that Bookfinder.com can find most Egyptological publications, no matter when they were written and searches literally hundreds of bookshops online to find the work you need. There are also bookshops dedicated to Egyptological publications - spread throughout the world. I gave a list of these bookshops (back in 2009) on this forum here.

So, I don't find most of your arguments convincing: you can get access to translation help in most cases via your university system, or via talking with your supervisor on how to access foreign language works. You can get access to professional Egyptologists and Egyptological resources, if you will be bothered to look for them. If you want articles and books on the topic, there are online resources for them as well.

It's really all up to what YOU are willing to do.
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Oriental Institute
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Doctoral Programme [Egyptology]
Oxford University
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PostPosted: Sat May 18, 2013 12:08 am    Post subject: Re: Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt? Reply with quote

Thanks for pointing out what a lazy, worthless looser I really am. I'm sure you're completely correct and I am totally wrong about the circumstances under which I have to try to get access to academic materials, and about the law in my country about copyright. Rule Britannia!

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PostPosted: Sat May 18, 2013 6:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you misunderstood. Neseret and I just tried to help you with information. How would it be if you could maybe tell us first what country and in what city do you live? Maybe we can point you to some resources you have been missing up to now?

Greetings, Lutz.
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Iker
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Joined: 22 Mar 2014
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 2:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the price of this work is beyond the reach of anyone then I can recommend a subset of the information which was published as "The Oxford Essential Guide to Egyptian Mythology". Its available for under a dollar on Amazon. It deals with religion, myth, magic and has some really great articles, though the text is quite small print.

A poster above mentions works that deal with the "soul" and I believe Louis Žabkar's "A Study of the Ba Concept in Ancient Egyptian Texts" is still a standard reference work. The Oriental Institute in Chicago have kindly allowed a free download of the work for personal use in adobe pdf format.
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dzama923
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Location: Stamford, Connecticut

PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2017 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have the Oxford encyclopedia of the history of ancient Egypt . It is a little different. I like to have it as a reference. It has good pictures, mostly black and white. It seems like a pretty thorough summary of the known history of the ancient Egyptian culture.
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2017 11:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dzama923 wrote:
I have the Oxford encyclopedia of the history of ancient Egypt . ...

I do not think so, because there is no book with this title. I guess you're talking about ...

The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt. - [Ed. Ian Shaw]. - Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2000 [2002 paperback, 2003 New Ed.]. - ISBN : 0198150342. - 512 p., frontispiece, figs [ills (some colour), plans, maps].
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