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Is anyone following ancient egyptian deity?

 
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Usermaatinpu
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 08, 2013 5:38 pm    Post subject: Is anyone following ancient egyptian deity? Reply with quote

I, personally a follower of god Anubis. Very Happy
I would like to know if there is anybody is following lord Anubis himself or any other ancient Egyptian gods? Idea
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karnsculpture
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 08, 2013 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't, but I get the impression that rather than just worship one god, most Ancient Egyptians worshipped the right one for any circumstance. Some people will have had a "favourite" they followed as part of a family tradition (e.g. Horemheb said that he owed the kingship to a local version of Horus); Ay, Yuya and family seem associated with Min.

Different gods related to different aspects of life, or parts of the country, or the elements or forces (war, pestilence, the weather etc).
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neseret
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 08, 2013 11:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

karnsculpture wrote:
I don't, but I get the impression that rather than just worship one god, most Ancient Egyptians worshipped the right one for any circumstance. Some people will have had a "favourite" they followed as part of a family tradition (e.g. Horemheb said that he owed the kingship to a local version of Horus); Ay, Yuya and family seem associated with Min.

Different gods related to different aspects of life, or parts of the country, or the elements or forces (war, pestilence, the weather etc).


In reality, most ancient Egyptians probably followed only the deity of his town or village, with a passing nod to other deities in matters such as childbirth (Bes and Hathor). Beyond that, references to other deities were not unlike the manner in which Romans invoked the names of their gods, as a "socially appropriate" term (such as referring to Mars when at war, Cupid and Venus when discussing matters of love, etc.).

By the time of the New Kingdom, certain deities were "universal" deities - usually coming about by favour of the royal house. So, the deities, Re, Horus, and Atum were favoured as universal solar deities, which were always associated with the institution of kingship, while Amun and Ptah, as well as Thoth, had surges of royal popularity since the Middle Kingdom In such a case, deference was acknowledged by officials to these deities as part of the royal government, but rarely were these considered the "personal" deities of the everyday Egyptian.

Simply because there were multiple deities in the Egyptian pantheon does not mean that every Egyptian acknowledged them in personal worship.

On this issue, see

Baines, J. 1991. Society, Morality, and Religious Practice. In B. E. Shafer, Ed., Religion in Ancient Egypt: Gods, Myths, and Personal Practice: 123-200. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Bomann, A. H. 1991. The Private Chapel in Ancient Egypt. A Study of the Chapels in the Workmen's Village at El Amarna with Special Reference to Deir el Medina and Other Sites. Studies in Egyptology. transl. London: Kegan Paul International.

Demarée, R. J. 1983. The Ax iqr n Ra-Stelae: On Ancestor Worship in Ancient Egypt. Egyptologische Uitgaven. transl. Leiden: Nederlands Instituut voor het Nabije Oosten.

Englund, G., Ed. 1989. The Religion of the Ancient Egyptians: Cognitive Structures and Popular Expressions. BOREAS 20: Uppsala Studies in Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Civilizations. Uppsala: ACTA Universitatis Upsaliensis.

Hornung, E. 1982. Conceptions of God in Ancient Egypt: The One and the Many. J. Baines, transl., transl. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

_________. 1992. Idea Into Image: Essays on Ancient Egyptian Thought. E. Bredeck, transl., transl. New York: Timken Publishers.

Kees, H. 1956. Der Götterglaube im alten Ägypten. transl. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag.

Posener, G. 1975. La piété personnelle avant l'âge amarnien.Revue d' Egyptologie 27: 195-210.

Sadek, A. I. 1988. Popular Religion in Egypt During the New Kingdom. Hildesheimer Ägyptologische Beiträge 27. transl. Hildesheim: Gerstenberg.

Tobin, V. A. 1989. Theological principles of Egyptian religion. American University Studies. Series 7, Theology and Religion 59. transl. New York: Peter Lang.

HTH.
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Katherine Griffis-Greenberg

Doctoral Candidate
Oriental Institute
Oriental Studies
Doctoral Programme [Egyptology]
Oxford University
Oxford, United Kingdom

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