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co regency relief

 
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kylejustin
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2014 7:43 am    Post subject: co regency relief Reply with quote

i'm reading the PDF 'the amarna succession' by james allen. on page 3 he mentions a block from memphis that has two male figures in it, interpreted as akhenaten and his co regent. but there is no drawing/image. does anyone know anything of this block?
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2014 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

James P. Allen : The Amarna Succession. - In: Causing his name to live - FS Murnane - CHANE 37. - 2009. - pp. 9 - 20:
Quote:
... A relief found at Memphis, apparently showing a male king behind a larger figure, has often been cited as evidence of a coregency between Smenkhkare (as the smaller figure) and Akhenaten (as the larger).[8] The identification of the smaller figure as Smenkhkare was based on a second block from the same site, which preserves the ends of his cartouches and that of a queen, probably Meritaten.[9] The cartouches, however, are juxtaposed directly with those of the Aten, at the same level and approximately the same size, which must indicate that Smenkhkare was depicted as the primary figure in the scene below.[10] Both blocks are preserved only in drawings; additional drawings of the first block, recently published, indicate that the scene probably depicted an Amarna princess behind one of her parents.[11] ...

[8] P.E. Newberry, “Akhenaten’s Eldest Son-in-Law Ankhkheperura,” JEA 14 (1928), p. 8 Fig. 3.
[9] Newberry, JEA 14 (1928), p. 8 Fig. 4. For the seated woman at the end of the queen’s cartouche, cf. Harris, AO 36 (1974), pp. 13 (1a) and 17 (2a, 2d).
[10] The scene seems to depict the king presenting a building to the Aten: see, however, B. Löhr, “Ahanjati in Memphis,” SAK 2 (1975), p. 158. If so, it is unlikely that he was facing another figure of comparable size on the other side of the Aten.
[11] J. Málek, “The ‘coregency relief’ of Akhenaten and Smenkhkare from Memphis,” in Studies in Honor of William Kelly Simpson, ed. by P. Der Manuelian (Boston, 1996), vol. II, pp. 553–59. The identification of the smaller figure as a woman was suggested by B. Löhr, SAK 2 (1975), pp. 156–57. ...

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Lutz
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2014 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CHARLES NICHOLSON : ON THE DISK-WORSHIPPERS OF MEMPHIS. - In: Aegyptiaca. - London, 1891. - pp. 117 - 134, 2 plates, appendix. The drawing of the blocks is on plate 1... And they seem to be in Australia???

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 2:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

this one?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, No. 4 & 5. But they are not in Australia, they are lost. In Australia is a 3rd piece from this dig:
Quote:
"... One piece, which is now in the Museum of the University of Sydney, Australia, has an inscription upon it which records a temple of the Aten at Memphis. ..."

(Percy E. Newberry : Akhenaten's Eldest Son-in-Law Ankhkheprure. - JEA 14. - 1928. - pp. 3 - 9, on page 8.)
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

that's rather disappointing. would have been nice had these blocks survived for study.
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 15, 2014 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe this article

Jaromir Malek : The "Coregency relief" of Akhenaten and Smenkhkare from Memphis. - In: Studies in Honor of William Kelly Simpson 2. - Boston, 1996. - pp. 553 - 559

can help. Especially with these illustrations on page 556 :



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 17, 2014 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Lutz"]Maybe this article

Jaromir Malek : The "Coregency relief" of Akhenaten and Smenkhkare from Memphis. - In: Studies in Honor of William Kelly Simpson 2. - Boston, 1996. - pp. 553 - 559

can help. Especially with these illustrations on page 556 :




The trouble is that previously Smenkhkare was thought to be the only co-regent of Akhenaten. In "Amarna Sunset", Aidan Dodson opines the drawing represents a female. James Allen separated Ankhe[t]kheperure Neferneferuaten [Nefertiti] from Ankhkheperure Smenkhkare Djeserkheperu once and for all. They are not the same person.
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 17, 2014 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lutz wrote:
James P. Allen : The Amarna Succession. - In: Causing his name to live - FS Murnane - CHANE 37. - 2009. - pp. 9 - 20:
Quote:
... A relief found at Memphis, apparently showing a male king behind a larger figure, has often been cited as evidence of a coregency between Smenkhkare (as the smaller figure) and Akhenaten (as the larger).[8] The identification of the smaller figure as Smenkhkare was based on a second block from the same site, which preserves the ends of his cartouches and that of a queen, probably Meritaten.[9] The cartouches, however, are juxtaposed directly with those of the Aten, at the same level and approximately the same size, which must indicate that Smenkhkare was depicted as the primary figure in the scene below.[10] Both blocks are preserved only in drawings; additional drawings of the first block, recently published, indicate that the scene probably depicted an Amarna princess behind one of her parents.[11] ...

[8] P.E. Newberry, “Akhenaten’s Eldest Son-in-Law Ankhkheperura,” JEA 14 (1928), p. 8 Fig. 3.
[9] Newberry, JEA 14 (1928), p. 8 Fig. 4. For the seated woman at the end of the queen’s cartouche, cf. Harris, AO 36 (1974), pp. 13 (1a) and 17 (2a, 2d).
[10] The scene seems to depict the king presenting a building to the Aten: see, however, B. Löhr, “Ahanjati in Memphis,” SAK 2 (1975), p. 158. If so, it is unlikely that he was facing another figure of comparable size on the other side of the Aten.
[11] J. Málek, “The ‘coregency relief’ of Akhenaten and Smenkhkare from Memphis,” in Studies in Honor of William Kelly Simpson, ed. by P. Der Manuelian (Boston, 1996), vol. II, pp. 553–59. The identification of the smaller figure as a woman was suggested by B. Löhr, SAK 2 (1975), pp. 156–57. ...


If the diadem band hanging down the neck of the smaller figure is really there, it can't be a princess but must be a queen. The shape of the head reminds of the cap-crown of Nefertiti. On the other hand, I cannot recall Nefertiti being depicted as so small compared to Akhenaten. I have no idea how faint this image was--but maybe it's a boy with a bald head. In the tomb of one of the sons of Ramesses III, the deceased follows behind his father, carrying just such a fan.

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