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E.B. Simmance : Amenhotep Son of Hapu (M.Res.Thesis, 2014)

 
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:16 am    Post subject: E.B. Simmance : Amenhotep Son of Hapu (M.Res.Thesis, 2014) Reply with quote

Eleanor Beth Simmance : Amenhotep Son of Hapu - Self-presentation through statues and their texts in pursuit of semi-divine intermediary status. - Birmingham : University, Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity, 2014. - 122 p. (5 MB)
Quote:
Abstract: The name of Amenhotep son of Hapu is well-known to scholars. He was similarly distinguished in ancient times as one who reached extraordinary heights during life and whose memory was preserved for centuries after death. This thesis engages with the premise that an individual constructed monuments for commemoration and memorialisation, and thus that the individual was governed by this motive during their creation. Two statues of Amenhotep in particular are believed to have served as mediators between human and god, and by exploring the ways in which he presented himself on the nine contemporary statues which are currently known (all but one originating at Karnak) it is argued that he deliberately portrayed himself as a suitable intermediary, encouraging this form of remembrance. This conclusion is reached through an examination of the features and context of each statue and how they contributed to the identification as intermediary, and by an examination of the titles and epithets which appear within the texts. Finally, it is suggested that his lifetime success, intermediary status and eventual deification were products of past traditions and of New Kingdom attitudes towards religion and politics, traditions and attitudes of which he, as a learned man, was thoroughly aware.

Greetings, Lutz.
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Rozette
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2014 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for sharing the link Lutz Smile !!!!!!!!!!!!


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karnsculpture
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2014 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A really good read.

I find the similar statues of Horemheb and Paramessu intriguing as well.

Horemheb is shown as an intermediary between the King and dignitaries in his Saqqara tomb (and at least two scribal statues exist that I know of),
; and as is noted in the paper Lutz shared the link to, statues of Paramessu were found adjacent to those of Amenhotep Son Of Hapu at Karnak.

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/23.10.1

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/16/Statue_Paramessu_Legrain.jpg

These statues may have not served the same function but it is interesting that they all survived possibly in situ, never deliberately damaged, indicating that all three were figures of some renown during and after their life times. Amenhotep Son Of Hapu however never ruled, which makes his veneration in later times more interesting.
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