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What is good book for learning the animals of egypt

 
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 10:19 pm    Post subject: What is good book for learning the animals of egypt Reply with quote

I am looking all these reliefs and papyri and sometimes I cannot tell what animals they are depicting. I am wondering which book I would be able get to explain to me all the different ones they were depicting.
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2014 3:27 pm    Post subject: Re: What is good book for learning the animals of egypt Reply with quote

dzama923 wrote:
I am looking all these reliefs and papyri and sometimes I cannot tell what animals they are depicting. I am wondering which book I would be able get to explain to me all the different ones they were depicting.


Try:

Arnold, D. 2010. Falken, Katzen, Krokodile: Tiere im Alten Ägypten; aus den Sammlungen des Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, und des Ägyptischen Museums Kairo. Zürich: Museum Rietberg.

Aufrère, S. H. 2013. Serpents, magie et hiéroglyphes: études sur les noms d'ophidiens d'un ensemble de cippes d'Horus de Thèbes et d'ailleurs (époque libyenne). Égypte Nilotique et Méditerranéenne 6: 93-122.

Bard, K. A. 2005. Some Predynastic and Early Dynastic representations of the dog. Journal of the Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities 32: 67-70.

Beinlich, H. 2013. Götter, Tiere, Statuetten.
Boltin, L. 1960. Sculptured Animals. Beasts, birds, mythical creatures have been immortalized in Art, Natural History. The Journal of the American Museum of Natural History (New York, N.Y.) Vol. 69/4 (April 1960): 24-32.

Brewer, D. E., et al. 1994. Domestic Plants and Animals: The Egyptian Origins. Warminster: Aris and Philips.

DuQuesne, Terence 2007. The Egyptian attitude to animals. In W. el-Saddik, and S. A. Razek (eds), Anubis, Upwawet, and other deities: personal worship and official religion in ancient Egypt. Previously unseen treasures from the Salakhana trove, Asyut, with collateral objects from the galleries of the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, and elsewhere. Catalogue of the exhibition at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo, March 2007: 9-15. Cairo: Supreme Council of Antiquities.

Germond, P. and J. Livet. 2001. Ancient Egyptian Bestiary: Animals in life and religion in the land of the Pharaohs. London/New York: Thames and Hudson.

Greenlaw, C. 2011. The representation of monkeys in the art and thought of Mediterranean cultures: a new perspective on ancient primates. BAR International Series 2192. Oxford: Archaeopress

Hare, T. 2013. How to figure animal fables: animals at play in P. Turin 55001 and Chôjû giga. In E. Frood and A. McDonald (eds), Decorum and experience: essays in ancient culture for John Baines: 220-225. Oxford: Griffith Institute.

Houlihan, P. 1996. The Animal World of the Pharaohs. London: Thames and Hudson.

_________. 1986. The Birds of Ancient Egypt. Warminster: Aris and Philips/American University in Cairo Press.

Ikram, S.2007. Animals in the ritual landscape at Abydos: a synopsis. In Z. A. Hawass, and J. E. Richards (eds), The archaeology and art of ancient Egypt: essays in honor of David B. O'Connor. 1: 417-432. Le Caire: Conseil Suprême des Antiquités de l'Egypte.

Janssen, R. and J. Janssen. 1989. Egyptian Household Animals. Shire Egyptology. Aylesbury: Shire Publications.

Kessler, Dieter 2007. Spitzmaus, Ichneumon und Ratte im Tierfriedhof. Bulletin of the Egyptian Museum 4: 71-82.

Kitagawa, Chiori 2008. On the presence of deer in ancient Egypt: analysis of the osteological record. Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 94: 209-222.

Kühn, T. 2011. Falken - Katzen - Krokodile - Tiere im Alten Ägypten: aus den Sammlungen des Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York und des Ägyptischen Museums in Kairo im Museum Rietberg in Zürich. Kemet 2011/1: 62-65.

Lehmann, S. 2011. Skizzen aus einer ägyptischen Malerwerkstatt: Tiere, Fabelwesen und Menschen im Artemidor-Papyrus. Archiv für Papyrusforschung und verwandte Gebiete 57/2: 267-273.

Longhi, O. 2007. Le culte du chat en Égypte ancienne. Histoire Antique 31: 16-21.

Malek, J. 1990. Adoration of the Great Cat. EES Newsletter 6: 6-9.

______. 1997. The Cat in Ancient Egypt. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Manlius, N. 2008. The side-striped jackal, canis adustus: a new element of Egyptian bestiary? Journal of the Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities 35: 153-158.

Mastropaolo, S. 2013. Lexique animalier égyptien: les caprins, les ovins et les bovins. BAR International Series 2485. Oxford: Archaeopress.

McDonald, Angela 2009. The curiosity of the cat in hieroglyphs. In D. Magee, J. Bourriau, and S.Quirke (eds), Sitting beside Lepsius: studies in honour of Jaromir Malek at the Griffith Institute: 361-379. Leuven: Peeters; Departement Oosterse Studies.

Ofterdingen, H. 2007. Serpent sacré: animal terrifiant. Histoire Antique 31: 26-27.

__________. 2007. Animaux sacrés. Histoire Antique 31: 28-31.

Osypińska, M. 2012. Animals in rock art: results of archaeozoological research at the site of El-Gamamiya 67 (Fourth Cataract, Sudan). Polish Archaeology in the Mediterranean 21 (research 2009): 703-713.

Pape, Y. le 2007. Crocodile et hippopotame. Histoire Antique 31: 22-25.

Schmitz, B. 2013. Ibis und Pavian: die Tiere des Thot in Hildesheim. In M. C. Floßmann-Schütze, M. Goecke-Bauer, F. Hoffmann, A. Hutterer, K. Schlüter, A. Schütze, and M.Ullmann (eds), Kleine Götter - große Götter: Festschrift für Dieter Kessler zum 65. Geburtstag: 417-426. Vaterstetten: Patrick Brose.

Shih-Wei H. 2013. Figurative expressions referring to animals in royal inscriptions of the 18th Dynasty. Journal of Egyptian History 6 (1): 1-18.

Van Neer, W., V. Linseele, R. Friedman, and B. De Cupere 2014. More evidence for cat taming at the Predynastic elite cemetery of Hierakonpolis (Upper Egypt). Journal of Archaeological Science 45: 103-111.

<Unknown>. 1990. De katten van de Farao's. 4000 jaar goddelijke gratie. Brussels: Konninklijk Belgische Instituut voor Naturwetenschappen.

Weiß, G. 2012. Tiere und ihr Kult. In D. Graen, (ed.), Ägypten: unbekannte Schätze aus Thüringer Sammlungen: 34-35. Jena: Friedrich-Schiller-Universität.

Weyerstraß, H. 2007. Die Symbolik der Tiere. In Anonymous (ed.), "Ich glaubte bezaubert zu sein": eine fotografische Zeitreise ins alte Ägypten: 24-35. [Köln]: Verl. dieterklein.com.

Wildung, Dietrich 2011. Tierbilder und Tierzeichen im Alten Ägypten. Berlin/München: Deutscher Kunstverlag

Wimmer, S. J. 2013. Falsche Tiere: ein weiteres Exemplar einer nachgemachten Tonstele des Pa-shed aus dem frühen 20. Jahrhundert. In M. C. Floßmann-Schütze, M. Goecke-Bauer, F. Hoffmann, A. Hutterer, K. Schlüter, A. Schütze, and M.Ullmann (eds), Kleine Götter - große Götter: Festschrift für Dieter Kessler zum 65. Geburtstag: 559-563. Vaterstetten: Patrick Brose.

Zahradnik, E.2009. Der Hund als geliebtes Haustier im Alten Ägypten: anhand von bildlichen, schriftlichen und archäologischen Quellen. Altes und Mittleres Reich. Berlin: Pro Business.

HTH.
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2014 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks this list is extensive, do you know if the ones in other languages are available also in English?
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2014 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dale J. Osborn / Jana Osbornová : The Mammals of Ancient Egypt. - [The Natural History of Egypt 4]. - Warminster : Aris & Phillips, 1998. - ISBN : 0856685109; 0856685224. - IX, 213 p., ills.

should be, following your first post, exactly that what you are looking for (I have it in my private library, bought it reasonably priced second-hand a few years ago).
Quote:
OEB 43394 (AEB 1998.1086) : "The basic purpose of this book in the series (see AEB 1986.1000, 1991.10426 and 1994.1183) is to enable readers to identify the mammals that were depicted by the ancient Egyptians and the many different roles these animals played in their lives. The author discusses the errors and discrepancies in portraying and naming animals by ancient artists, and the misunderstandings made in modern analysis. Summaries are given on present and past distribution of each species and notes on their natural history. The book provides a sound basis for the archaeologist in identifying the species through the numerous illustrations, and to the general reader a survey of this important aspect of an ancient culture with its vivid portrayal of the natural world and astonishing accuracy of observation.

After the general introductory Chapter 1 on the depictions of animals from the Predynastic palettes and knife handles to the tomb and temple representations of the dynastic period follow Chapters 2-14 on the various kinds of animals, giving nomenclature (if known, also the Egyptian names), description, natural history of the species, distribution presence in the prehistoric and dynastic periods, errors and discrepancies. Chapter 2, insectivores; hedgehogs and shrews (with a table of the characteristics of bronze shrews and ichneumons). Chapter 3, bats, either fruit- or insect-eating. Chapter 4, primates: Hamadryas and Anubis baboons, Green and Patas monkeys. Chapter 5, lagomorphs: Cape hare. Chapter 6, rodents: squirrel, mice, rats, jerds, jerboa, and porcupine. Chapter 7, carnivores: jackal; domestic dogs (tesem, greyhound, saluki, pariah, mastiff), foxes, fennec, with an appendix on canine gods; hyenas, bear, weasel, zoril, ratel, otter, genet, ichneumon, aardwolf; wild, domestic and jungle cats; serval, caracal, lion, leopard, and cheetah. Furthermore, Chapter 8-11, on aardvark, pangolins, elephants and hyraxes, respectively. Chapter 12, odd-toed ungulates: wild and domestic asses, horse, zebras, the black and the white rhinoceros. Chapter 13, even-toed ungulates: boar and pig, wart hog, hippopotamus, giraffe, okapi, dama deer, camels, giant eland, sitatunga, addax, oryxes, antelope, kob, Nile lechwe, hartebeest and wildebeest, gerenuk, dibatag, gazelles, ibexes and goats, sheep, aurochs and domestic cow, zebu, Cape buffalo, and the extinct giant buffalo. Finally, Chapter 14, dolphins. Brief statistical summary, extensive bibliography, and index added. (L.Z.)"

Greetings, Lutz.
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2014 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dzama923 wrote:
Thanks this list is extensive, do you know if the ones in other languages are available also in English?


If they were, I would have listed them.

In Egyptology, three main languages are used throughout the field: English, German, and French. Every student in Egyptology has to have a reading skill (if not speaking skill) in all three languages. As such, not every article is translated into other languages.

There are now Egyptological works in Polish, Dutch, Czech, Russian, Arabic, etc. Some of these get translated into one of the three major languages of Egyptology, but even then, not all.

It may become a requirement in the not-so-distant future that every Egyptology student will need to also know Arabic, for example, since Egyptian Egyptologists are not required in Egypt to translate their works into one of the three main languages of Egyptology. As such, we, as western Egyptologists, are now missing out on major works in Arabic simply because there are no translations.

I always suggest that there are sufficient translation tools for your computer these days that simply not understanding a language is not the barrier it used to be.

When asked, I suggest a site called Freetranslation.com as a good way to take foreign texts and get them translated in a more "natural voice" way. I use it with texts that I sometimes struggle with, and as I am versed in several languages anyway, I know that it is a good site.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 2:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Lutz, I have just purchased the book, Mammals of Ancient Egypt. I look forward to getting into it, thanks for the suggestion.
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 05, 2017 12:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Lutz, thanks for recommending the book, Mammals of Ancient Egypt. I just got it delivered, and I have flipped through and read some of the pages. It has a lot of nice information. Thanks.
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