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Review and Commentary of The Egyptain Book of the Dead
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dzama923
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 9:53 pm    Post subject: Review and Commentary of The Egyptain Book of the Dead Reply with quote

This topic I want to start as a review and commentary of the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, as translated by Raymond O Faulkner. Any comments are welcomed, as I want to see what people think about this text. The book is a compliation of some of the Pyramid Texts, and the Papyrus of Ani. This book was my first introduction into Ancient Egyptian literature, and I want to see what other people think about what it says and/or said about the Anicent Egyptian people and culture.

I think the book personally is a profound translation of the ideas of the Ancient Egyptian religion. The book is a collection of spells that were used ritually and written down for the protection of the deceased's journey into and through the world of the afterlife. Wherein, we find dangers that need to be evaded, and situations that are found in our world. For example, there is a spell "To prevent from getting biten by a snake", and there are spells for being transformed into a heron, or a snake, or a lotus. So by these spells the deceased would be able to live like them, and be safe and free in the afterlife.

The religion, as expounded in this book, is very interesting. It is quite a thorough depiction of the spirits and stages or pathways the deceased would take. They seem to have made their religion and belief in the afterlife into a science. It is very elaborated and leaves me questioning what it is they are saying. This is reminiscent of the spell; For donning the head of mystery. They, too, seemed to be close to this idea of their religion being unknown, and mysterious, having as its focal point death. They have left us with an account of overcoming and passing through the gates of the afterlife, which is a journey they describe. I think this rendition of the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead is one which encompasses a lot of the important points in the Ancient Egyptian religion, and for that reason worth studying.
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Barry Kemp : How to Read the Egyptian Book of the Dead. - London : Granta Books, 2007. - ISBN : 9781862079137. - VIII, 125 p.
Quote:
In this book, which is intended for the general public, the author gives a basic introduction to the Book of the Dead by describing its major topics and intent, as well as explaining the underlying funerary beliefs. In each of the 10 chapters (1. Between the worlds; 2. Working with myths; 3. The landscape of the Otherworld; 4. Voyages and pathways; 5. Reviewing one's life; 6. The body's integrity; 7. Voice and performance; 8. Empowerment; 9. Becoming a god; 10. Perpetual fears) one or more selected spells from the Book of the Dead are cited as examples. A rough chronology of ancient Egypt, suggestions for further reading, and an index of names, toponyms, and topics are added at the end of the book.


BMSAES - British Museum Studies in Ancient Egypt and Sudan 15. - November 2010
Quote:
This issue contains 13 papers from the colloquium, The Book of the Dead - Recent Research and New Perspectives, held at the British Museum on 21–22 July 2009. The meeting brought together leading scholars working on aspects of the Book of the Dead. Several of their contributions have been influential in the development of the exhibition Journey through the afterlife: ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead (4 November 2010 – 6 March 2011).
The papers presented here represent the majority of those that will eventually appear in a hard copy publication, though with more extensive use of colour than will be possible in that volume. Neal Spencer, Elisabeth O'Connell and Liam McNamara edited the papers, with the assistance of John Taylor. (Neal Spencer)


Contents :

Three funerary papyri from Thebes : New evidence on scribal and funerary practice in the Late Period
Burkhard Backes

The Book of the Dead as canon
John Gee

Creating borders : New insights into making the Papyrus of Ani
Bridget Leach and Richard B. Parkinson

The two funerary papyri of Queen Nedjmet (P. BM EA 10490 and P. BM EA 10541 + Louvre E. 6258)
Giuseppina Lenzo

The guardian-demons of the Book of the Dead
Rita Lucarelli

In the footsteps of Edouard Naville (1844–1926)
Barbara Lüscher

An intriguing Theban Book of the Dead tradition in the Late Period
Malcom Mosher, Jr.

Memphis–Thebes : Local traditions in the Late Period
Marcus Müller-Roth

The Book of the Dead Project : Past, present and future
Marcus Müller-Roth

Evidence of a master copy transferred from Thebes to the Memphis area in Dynasty 26
Irmtraut Munro

The Book of the Dead of Ankhesenaset ( P. BNF Egyptien 62-88 ). Traces of workshop production or scribal experiments?
Chloe Ragazzoli

Book of the Dead documents from the New Kingdom necropolis at Saqqara
Maarten J. Raven

When a Book of the Dead text does not match archaeology : The case of the protective magical bricks (BD 151)
Isabelle Régen

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dzama923
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you read the Raymond O'Faulkner version?
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This list is good, but I was wondering about people's thoughts on the Raymond O'Faulkner version.
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Lutz
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What we call "Book of the Dead" is a collection of Ancient Egyptian (not Faulkner) texts and spells, connectet with the conception of life after death in the NK, LP, and Greek-Roman Epoch, which were handed over in various compositions on different materials. They certainly also allow insights and conclusions to other areas of religion and society. But I think one should not make conclusions in this fields without further proofs from outside of these spell-collections, only on one or two individual spells from there.

Faulkner used in 1972 a composition from the 19th Dynasty from Thebes, made for the royal scribe Ani (today in the British Museum, P. London BM EA 10470). His professional competence is unquestionable, his performance undisputed. Certainly there is contradiction from one or the other side in one or the other detail, and suggestions for a different translation - otherwise it would not be Egyptology ... Cool Science and research are not silent and goes on.

Because it probably goes then around its style in your question (?), I am as a non-native speaker, when it comes to English, not so suitable to judge, sorry ... But I prefer the translation-stile and (more up to date) collection of the known spells by Stephen Quirke, also because I think, as a foreigner, his English is better and easier to understand.

By the way, the original book by Faulkner has been produced in 1972 in a limited edition of 1,500 copies for the members of the Limited Editions Club. Are you sure you have really read one of these 1.500 ?
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, I haven't read or heard about the 1972 limited edition publication.

It is important what you are saying, that the collection should not be taken to be the religion of any one time period, as it is a collection from multiple periods.
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 4:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dzama923 wrote:
... the collection should not be taken to be the religion of any one time period, as it is a collection from multiple periods.

Importent to say is, that it is a collection of spells and not "the religion" of Ancient Egypt, no matter what time period ...
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dzama923 wrote:
No, I haven't read or heard about the 1972 limited edition publication. ...

" Egyptian Dreams Forum Index -> Books -> Best Published Book of the Dead "
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lutz, regarding your post saying that this book is not a book of their religion in any time period, I think you are right because it is a collection of spells not the whole religion. Maybe the book of Gates is better? Either way their religion seems to be highly imaginative since this collection of spells seems to be also a collection of their knowledge. Each spell is highly informative, and is based on their "knowledge". It could be more a book of their knowledge. I would even say that they were like a prescription, as most of them are geared towards an ailment or affliction in the realm of the dead.

I recommend you read it Lutz, as it is an interesting translation of the old egyptian papyri. The english is not so difficult as the spells are concise.
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2017 6:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Books, or better documents of their "knowledge" are, for example, the so called medical papyri, like the Edwin Smith or the Ebers Papyrus.

The collections of spells known as PT, CT & BD and also the so called books of the netherworld like Amduat, Book of Caverns, Gates or the Book of the Night are documents of there faith and mythology.

If I ever felt the need to read a BD papyrus completely, I will surely choose a translation into German ...
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I attempted to read the Pyramid Texts straight through awhile ago...and gave up in boredom. Tedious going, to say the least. Laughing
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unas wrote:
I attempted to read the Pyramid Texts straight through awhile ago...and gave up in boredom. ...

To the honorable salvation of the Egyptian authors is to say, all these compositions were never thought or written as a reading for the living ... Cool

Greetings, Lutz.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 3:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

To the honorable salvation of the Egyptian authors is to say, all these compositions were never thought or written as a reading for the living ... Cool
Lutz said... I would add or read at once.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
To the honorable salvation of the Egyptian authors is to say, all these compositions were never thought or written as a reading for the living ... Cool


Agreed! Laughing

And if simply reading the texts can be tiring--consider the poor workmen who carved them!: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyramid_Texts#/media/File:Hieroglyph_Text_from_Teti_I_pyramid.jpg
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 2:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would actually enjoy craving the spells. I would say that they are actually difficult to understand, and that is why I would not be able to read them through in one sitting. They are very dense and filled with information. I am talking again of the Raymond O'Faulkner collection of papyri.
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