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My favorite books

 
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anneke
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2005 7:54 pm    Post subject: My favorite books Reply with quote

My favorite books Smile

I provided links to amazon.com because there are usually editorial reviews that will give you a good idea what the book is about.
This is not meant to be a complete list, but these are the books that I end up going back to again and again because of the wealth of information they contain.
And my wallet is sad to report that I own every single one of theseā€¦.

And yes I am particularly fond of the New Kingdom. With emphasis on the 18th and 19th dynasties.

The Hidden Tombs of Memphis: New Discoveries from the Time of Tutankhamun and Ramesses the Great (New aspects of antiquity) by Geoffrey T. Martin
Great book that shows some of the finds in Saqqara. Detailed descriptions of the tombs of Horemheb, Maya and Merit, and Tia and Tia (sister and brother-in-law of Ramses the Great) click here for detail

Texts from the Amarna Period in Egypt by William J. Murnane, Edmund S. Meltzer
This book has translations of all kinds of texts from the amarna period. Includes texts from some of the Amarna tombs, as well as other structures and objects.
click here for detail

The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt: A Genealogical Sourcebook of the Pharaohs by Aidan Dodson, Dyan Hilton
[url=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0500051283/ref=pd_sr_ec_ir_b/103-3573621-5644637?v=glance&s=books&st=*]click here for detail [/url]

Akhenaten: King of Egypt by Cyril Aldred
click here for detail

Nefertiti: Unlocking the Mystery Surrounding Egypt's Most Famous and Beautiful Queen by Joyce Tyldesley
click here for detail

Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh by Joyce Tyldesley
click here for detail

Ramesses: Egypt's Greatest Pharaohby Joyce Tyldesley
click here for detail

Women in Ancient Egypt by gay Robins
click here for detail

Tombs, treasures, mummies: Seven great discoveries of Egyptian archaeology by Dennis C Forbes
Great book with detailed descriptions of several excavations including Tutankhamen, Yuya and Tuya, Maiherpri, etc. Also has appendices about the great mummy caches including good photographs.
click here for detail


The Black Pharaohs: Egypt's Nubian Rulers by Robert G. Morkot
click here for detail


The Pyramids: The Mystery, Culture, and Science of Egypt's Great Monuments by Miroslav Verner, Steven Rendall
click here for detail

Ancient Records of Egypt: The Eighteenth Dynasty by James Henry Breasted
A collection of original inscriptions. This is available in pdf format on the web.
click here for detail
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Meritaten
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2005 3:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers for the recommendations! I have the Aldred and a couple of the Tyldesley books, and will keep an eye out for the others.

Any views on Reflections of Osiris by John Ray? I picked this up as airplane reading a few years ago, as I found the 'sampling' format attractive. It doesn't pretend to be any sort of comprehensive overview, but provides an introduction through a range of Egyptian stories drawn from a variety of texts. Ray's style is particularly engaging - amusing, insightful and extremely readable. Certainly not one of the dryer academic texts which I usually prefer!
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anneke
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2005 3:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had not heard of this book. I looked it up on amazon.com and it does sound interesting.
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Meritaten
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2005 3:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There was a great Guardian review that I thought was spot on here, Anneke:

http://books.guardian.co.uk/reviews/history/0,6121,779615,00.html

I don't know if you'd get much out of it as I think it's geared more towards beginners as an intro (which is why I picked it up...you'd fit more into the category of the person he dedicated it to - someone he said knew all about the subject and thus didn't need his book!) but you might enjoy the Ray's style - he's very witty, amusing and not at all patronising.
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Osiris II
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2005 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just finished reading "Reflections of Osiris" and consider it good, but lacking on any new information. It gives brief synopsis on several people in ancient Egypt, including Imhotep, Hapshepsut, Nectanebo II, and one of the best, in my opinion, Prince Khaemwise, one of Rameses II's children who Ray considers to be the first Egyptologist.
I enjoyed the book very much, but it couldn't be considered a detailed, deeply researched work. But as light, entertaining reading, it is quite good. Read it yourselves. It gives a new perpective on several individuals.
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Meritaten
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2005 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That seems to be the consensus, Osiris! I don't think it's a text for more advanced researchers (although the style and interpretation might make it interesting for them to read). Its clearly stated purpose is an introduction and a sampling - the scope of the timeframe it encompasses is far too broad to provide depth of analysis and material.

What are your recommendations for good overviews? I know that's a very broad question, but I'm hoping to find something that gives a solid overview. I've been very narrow in my focus (18th Dynasty primarily!), and have some substantive gaps in the overall progression of AE history.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2005 12:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not sure I've seen a book that really does a good job of giving a general overview. There's just too much going on.
I think actually that there are two good websites that give a nice overview, and these two are pretty accurate:

http://nefertiti.iwebland.com/
I have always found nefertiti.iwebland to be very accurate. There are good overviews of general history, and this site has one of the best selections of translated original texts I have encountered.
The site is active, new material is added regularly.

http://www.touregypt.net/egyptantiquities/
Touregypt is a very nice site. They have an extensive collection of articles on all kinds of topics, and they are generally very well done.


Both of these sites are well worth browsing. I often check their sites if I'm looking for information.
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2005 3:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I'm not sure I've seen a book that really does a good job of giving a general overview.


I think Cyril Aldred's The Egyptians is still considered one of the best general overviews. It's standard reading for any serious student. It's rather dry stuff but does a good job for so small a book.

Another fairly decent one is Ancient Egypt: An illustrated reference to the myths, religions, pyramids and temples of the land of the pharaohs, by Lorna Oakes and Lucia Gahlin. Yeah, I know, "illustrated." But this book touches on things other overviews do not and does a good job. And, well, it has lots of wonderful illustrations and photographs.

Any true student of ancient Egypt will find himself or herself occasionally referring to these types of books. There's just too much information to remember in the study of Egyptology, and we all need the general as well as the specific.
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Meritaten
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2005 5:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I think Cyril Aldred's The Egyptians is still considered one of the best general overviews. It's standard reading for any serious student. It's rather dry stuff but does a good job for so small a book.

Dry is fine, Kmt-Sesh! I work in an academic field (pretty far removed from Egypt - I'm in maritime history) so a bit of dry discourse isn't a deterrent. I'll start hunting these books up on your recommendations (with a hearty sigh for the days when all that involved was popping around the corner to the British Museum bookshop!).
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anneke
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2005 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should say that The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt by Dodson and Hilton does give a very good overview of history.
The book gives a chronological survey of the royal family from c. 3100BC and the 1st dynasty all the way to egypt's absorption into the Roman Empire.

For each dynasty or significant part of a dynasty the authors provide a historical overview of the period and a summary lsiting of the kings involved.

So this book does really give a nice overview of egypt's history and it's chronologically ordered by dynasty.

Maritime history sounds interesting. What time periods? My knowledge of that topic is limited to the history of the Dutch East India Company. I did read a book about the Batavia and its shipwreck. I saw the reconstruction of that (17th century) ship in the Netherlands.
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Meritaten
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2005 12:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I should say that The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt by Dodson and Hilton does give a very good overview of history.

The title alone has virtually sold it to me. I'm still at the point of reading works with a dynastic timeline bookmarked next to me so I can flip back and forward for reference as to when in the whole pantheon of dynasties I'm currently situated!

I'm primarily interested in British merchant shipping circa 1880 - 1939, the North Atlantic and Australian trades (although I'm an incorrigible dabbler in other areas as well!) The story of the Batavia is certainly one of the most fascinating - and horrifying - sagas of seafaring history. I'm a scubadiver, so am hoping to eventually become involved in marine archaeology through our Museum's programmes.

There are some tenuous Egyptian connections. When working with White Star Line and Cunard history, one of the myths that has to be repeatedly debunked is that a Mummy and attendant curse sunk the Titanic, Lusitania and - in some versions - even the Empress of Ireland! Amazing how often this crops up.

More attractively, there's some lovely Egyptian-themed shipping ephemera from the 20s and 30s, particularly on vessels destined for the Mediterranean and Red Sea. Menus, passenger guides etc - I'll have to hunt through my collection and see if I can find some to scan.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2005 1:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

anneke wrote:
Quote:
I should say that The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt by Dodson and Hilton does give a very good overview of history.


That one didn't even occur to me. I only recently purchased The Complete Royal Families and have merely perused it yet. It remains to receive its due attention on my behalf. Still, as wonderful as Dodson's book appears, it strikes as something a cut above a general overview. I don't think I would recommend it to a novice student.

Meritaten wrote:
Quote:
with a hearty sigh for the days when all that involved was popping around the corner to the British Museum bookshop!


Gee, how awful that must have been. Twisted Evil Trying to make the rest of us envious, aren't we? Well, even if you weren't, I'm envious. That must've been wonderful, actually. I'm to the point where I've picked clean the local Borders and Barnes & Nobles, not to mention my own museum's gift shop. These days I have to hunt through the digital world of places like Amazon, and pick the brains of people like anneke--she's responsible for my purchasing two books alone last week, and terrific books they are.
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anneke
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2005 1:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Meritaten wrote:

I'm primarily interested in British merchant shipping circa 1880 - 1939, the North Atlantic and Australian trades (although I'm an incorrigible dabbler in other areas as well!) The story of the Batavia is certainly one of the most fascinating - and horrifying - sagas of seafaring history.

I have to admit I know very little about merchant shipping.
Most of what I know (using the word very very loosely Very Happy) about the maritime world and salvage operations is from Clive Cussler books.

The Batavia is amazing to see. I was just shocked to see the "cow deck" (so named because it's about as high as a cow), and was then told that the soldiers spent most of their time there! More or less locked up (some even in cages to prevent fights with the sailors I think). I would be ready for a straight jacket after about an hour, let alone the months it took to get to the orient.

kmt_sesh wrote:
I only recently purchased The Complete Royal Families and have merely perused it yet. It remains to receive its due attention on my behalf. Still, as wonderful as Dodson's book appears, it strikes as something a cut above a general overview. I don't think I would recommend it to a novice student.

Maybe not as your very first book, but I think it's a wonderful read. I'm not sure you would need THAT much background to read it.

kmt_sesh also wrote:
These days I have to hunt through the digital world of places like Amazon, and pick the brains of people like anneke--she's responsible for my purchasing two books alone last week, and terrific books they are.

Instead of the tooth fairy, I'm the book fairy? Laughing
Glad you like 'em.

[They are
Akhenaten: King of Egypt by Cyril Aldred and
The Hidden Tombs of Memphis: New Discoveries from the Time of Tutankhamun and Ramesses the Great (New aspects of antiquity) by Geoffrey T. Martin in case people are wondering.
These are truly wonderful books if you're interested in the Amarna period and it's immediate aftermath.]
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kmt_sesh
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2005 1:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Most of what I know (using the word very very loosely ) about the maritime world and salvage operations is from Clive Cussler books.


I've never been a big fan of Cussler's fiction--a bit melodramatic for me--but I bought his first salvage book years ago and enjoyed it a great deal. I did like how he incorporated a bit of story telling into it. I purchased The Sea Hunters II awhile ago and have yet to get around to reading. It's yet another of those books on my shelves that I hope to read before I retire or expire, whichever comes first.

Quote:
Maybe not as your very first book, but I think it's a wonderful read. I'm not sure you would need THAT much background to read it.


Like I said, I haven't actually sat down to read it yet, but having looked through it, this one strikes me as a reference book. Is it actually a good one to sit down and read from cover to cover? Shall I delay no further?

Quote:
Instead of the tooth fairy, I'm the book fairy?


And there's more material for your signature: anneke, lady of the library, princess of the pages, mistress of the tomes of the tawy...
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